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Aug
28
answered Word for something that's worth remarking about
Aug
28
comment Which one is correct: “after a century of” or “after a century from”?
The prep. of is natural with after -- think of it, after doesn't go with from. IOW, you don't need after in case of using from: "The Solvay conference, a century from the first one, brought all the physics geniuses together once again." HTH.
Aug
28
comment Which one is correct: “after a century of” or “after a century from”?
@AndrewLeach Beg, why?
Aug
28
comment I need Hindi or Urdu speakers to translate the sentence for me
In one sense, the thought could be expressed with lest in English: "lest I die" -- however, broader context is required to understand the intended meaning of "मैैंं कहीं मर न जाऊं."
Aug
27
revised Conjunctions coordinating vs subordinating
added 19 characters in body
Aug
21
comment Can I use “more younger” in a sentence?
Why the down vote?
Aug
21
comment Can I use “more younger” in a sentence?
There's a subtle difference between saying "younger" and "more young" though. See also my comment at OP.
Aug
21
comment Can I use “more younger” in a sentence?
Some times, more can be used with adjectives that normally have the -er suffix, for changing the emphasis/ subtle difference in sense. So, it would fine to say "Who looks more young in this image, me or you?" -- but not both * more younger.
Aug
20
comment Alternative for “found something accidentally even when it was lying really close the whole time”
Actually, it's a case of "missed something even when it was lying really close the whole time" rather than one of epiphany -- could be more like aha moment instead.
Aug
18
comment Is it okay to ignore “I” in certain circumstances while writing a first-person essay?
Please also visit English Language Learners
Aug
18
comment Is it okay to ignore “I” in certain circumstances while writing a first-person essay?
Generally in such a sentence, the "I" occurs in another place within the sentence or closeby, such that it is implied by context. The example sentence in the question is ungrammatical. If there is no ambiguity in the context, ( "we don't know who is doing that"/ "the readers already know"), then it is fine in literary use, though.
Aug
18
revised “Sounds like a plan (, Stan!)”
added 6 characters in body; edited tags
Aug
16
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
15
comment What category of adjectives is this? i.e. adjectives entirely unlike their nouns
The noun and adjective may have different etymologies. An adjective is not necessarily derived from the noun. Good question, though.
Aug
12
awarded  Announcer
Aug
12
comment I need help with commas
Yes. It's needed for the literary effect in the place.
Aug
11
comment Repeating “the” with each item separated by “or”
@PeterShor Hope by now you have the things clearer. Do they? :)
Aug
9
comment Repeating “the” with each item separated by “or”
Please also visit English Language Learners
Aug
9
comment Repeating “the” with each item separated by “or”
Firstly, the definite article belongs to the noun following it and unrelated to the conjunction use: of the idealism or the materialism is grammatical and has its uses. However, in the present example, the use of definite article seems incorrect. The concepts are idealism and materialism -- no the before them.
Aug
9
comment So, we don't use “what happens?”, do we?
Oh yes, we do. And then, what happens?