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Jan
25
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
24
comment Word to describe something which exists both in the mortal world and the afterlife?
Wonder how that's related to the OP's context.
Jan
24
comment Not to mention A and/or B?
I do not see any confusion myself. I'm not sure why you do.
Jan
24
comment Not to mention A and/or B?
and, of course. If the OP is in the computer science area, the OP would certainly know beyond doubt.
Jan
21
comment What is the phrase for something which you determine in advance as going to turn out bad?
"Prepare for the worst."
Jan
20
comment What are the application conditions of the phrase “the same name”?
In a broad sense they are paronyms of each other. "Robert" and "Roberta" are polymorphs (forms) of the same word according to gender.
Jan
20
comment Can the verb “include” be followed by a clause?
What the OP seems to mean to say is "... which includes ... the fact that our client centre is open ..." -- the verb include forward references the noun the fact.
Jan
20
comment Can the verb “include” be followed by a clause?
David, 1. "I think ..." is an opinion/ comment. 2. Answers better be supported and referenced. See also: english.stackexchange.com/help HTH.
Jan
19
comment Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct?
Dan, Say, a word has been first used in 1572. It has been in use ever since, and is in use today. Compare: A word has been first used in 1600 and its last recorded use was in 1790; it's not in use any more in contemporary English anywhere in the world. -- We do have such lost words and dated usages.
Jan
19
comment Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct?
That's a different story from "Usage: 'Late 16th cent.'" -- origin versus currency. Many words/phrases have their origin centuries ago and yet are current today. Hope I'm clearer now.
Jan
19
comment Is there a word that means “not fitting my preferred version of reality”?
Not my cup of tea.
Jan
19
comment Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct?
Please use comments option.
Jan
19
comment Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct?
-1 Usage: "Late 16th cent." (oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/renumeration) -- not today.
Jan
19
comment Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct?
The word "remuneration" is often misspelled as "renumeration", which simply means counting or re-counting. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remuneration
Jan
19
comment Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct?
"... thought the correct word was Renumeration" for what? What made you think Renumeration was a word? Maybe you (?mis-)read the word the first time on?
Jan
19
comment Can the verb “include” be followed by a clause?
Perfect answer, but GR.
Jan
19
comment Can the verb “include” be followed by a clause?
Please use the comment option where appropriate.
Jan
19
revised Can the verb “include” be followed by a clause?
added 3 characters in body
Jan
19
comment On the use of latter within a sentence, how many does latter refer to
oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/latter
Jan
19
comment On the use of latter within a sentence, how many does latter refer to
Please look up use cases. Use later / latter with former (single units/ groups/ sets) and last with first (units in a long list). "The last two work twelve hours shifts."