154 reputation
116
bio website wizonesolutions.com
location Oakland, CA
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Feb 20 '13 at 10:31

I specialize in Drupal Development, having worked with the platform since mid-2007. I find myself doing a lot of site troubleshooting and updates. I maintain or help maintain several modules and wrote the original PHP client for the Meetup API.


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awarded  Famous Question
Jan
13
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
13
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
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awarded  Scholar
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7
comment Pronunciation of “Porsche” over time
This makes the most sense. Thanks!
Jan
7
accepted Pronunciation of “Porsche” over time
Jan
7
comment “Mic” as an abbreviation for microwave
This was my impression, and this answer basically covers what I was wondering.
Jan
7
accepted “Mic” as an abbreviation for microwave
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asked “Mic” as an abbreviation for microwave
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16
awarded  Student
Dec
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comment Pronunciation of “Porsche” over time
Sorry; I clarified the question to be clearer. I'm interested in if the general pronunciation is changing or if the differences I've observed are just regional or idiolect-driven.
Dec
16
revised Pronunciation of “Porsche” over time
Clarified that this is a question about if the word is changing.
Dec
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comment Pronunciation of “Porsche” over time
@JohnLawler: While I understand the base for your concerns, this is probably not the right forum to discuss them. It's largely a phenomenon that is to each their own. I speak Spanish fluently, for example, and while as a sole source of education, school wouldn't have been enough, I probably never would have attempted using it with friends and acquaintances (which is what really got me fluent) without it. Personal motivation is always a requirement.
Dec
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comment Pronunciation of “Porsche” over time
Heh @Sam - so it's not regional, it's...posessional.
Dec
15
comment Use of the adjective “spurious” to indicate properties of that which flows from a noun
Yeah, those two examples are incorrect uses of spurious. In fact, in the second, there is no need to attach a modifier (adjective) to tool at all. The sentence's meaning is clear without it. In the first example, faulty would be better. A usage I'd consider correct is, "His flawed analysis of the matter naturally led to spurious conclusions." The core usage is that of seeming correct or real, but not possessing the genuine qualities of the real thing, as mentioned in your Merriam-Webster link.
Dec
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asked Pronunciation of “Porsche” over time
Nov
12
comment Why “off” in “off to the sides”
Then I fall back to my comment about it being used because it sounds better in cases where it doesn't change the meaning. I imagine in that case that the preceding sentences or the ones after would have provided context as to the distance of the attack.
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10
awarded  Editor
Nov
10
comment Why “off” in “off to the sides”
I've edited my answer to give additional detail based on your question @Neon.
Nov
10
revised Why “off” in “off to the sides”
Added additional example based on comment.