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  • 0 posts edited
  • 2 helpful flags
  • 39 votes cast
Feb
29
comment What is the word to describe “the gaining of full control over an ability or power you already have”?
I reluctantly agree with @sam. Absolute control cannot exist without complete understanding, but complete understanding does not necessarily imply absolute control.
Feb
24
answered What is the word to describe “the gaining of full control over an ability or power you already have”?
Jan
9
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
@Gnawme decapitation is usually only one-way. On a similar, but completely unrelated tangent, if you "decapitulate", is that the same as surrendering, then (whilst your enemy is patting you down to look for hidden weapons) kneeing him or her in the private parts? (I'll stop now...)
Jan
6
comment What does “tell us know what you think” mean?
+1 for spell-checker auto-"correcting" to a grammatically incorrect sentence. That's exactly how I would assume such a sentence would come about. Except in cases where the author has read someone else's mistake elsewhere and thinks it means something.. :D
Jan
6
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
Not to be confused with "decapitate" ^^
Jan
6
accepted “If you or your colleague has” or “If you or your colleague have”?
Jan
6
comment “If you or your colleague has” or “If you or your colleague have”?
On second thoughts... technically "you" is singular in this case, and so is "your colleague"...
Jan
6
comment “If you or your colleague has” or “If you or your colleague have”?
Good explanation, good citation and it happens to agree with the result I chose. Cheers @Jay I should have mentioned I was looking for the British English definition, but that's my fault, not yours or anyone else's :)
Jan
6
awarded  Scholar
Jan
6
comment “If you or your colleague has” or “If you or your colleague have”?
@RegDwight thanks for the edit. I'm never sure which tags to use for best effect.
Jan
6
comment “If you or your colleague has” or “If you or your colleague have”?
+1 for sounds natural. Regardless of the correct grammatical answer, language evolves :)
Jan
5
awarded  Student
Jan
5
asked “If you or your colleague has” or “If you or your colleague have”?
Jan
3
comment Meaning of “best among the worst”
This could almost be moved to philosophy.stackexchange.com as the question relates to the subjective meaning of "good" and "bad", which, as any budding philosopher should know, is entirely relative to the observer's viewpoint ;-)
Jan
3
answered Meaning of “best among the worst”
Nov
23
answered Can “thanks in advance” be considered rude?
Nov
4
revised Is there a word for “a person who hardly understands things”?
Removed one of the links because I didn't think it really added anything
Nov
4
awarded  Supporter
Nov
4
answered Is there a word for “a person who hardly understands things”?
Nov
2
answered Any other good way of saying “Happy Birthday”?