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 Yearling
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  • 0 posts edited
  • 2 helpful flags
  • 39 votes cast
Nov
2
awarded  Yearling
Oct
7
comment Is there a passive for the sentence “Be quiet.”?
How about "It would be wonderful if quietness was observed, now."?
Oct
4
revised What's wrong with this sentence?
Removed the reference to the specific text editor in question
Oct
3
accepted What's wrong with this sentence?
Oct
3
asked What's wrong with this sentence?
Sep
26
comment Is “He picked up a quarrel” correct?
+1 for the short-wave radio operator example :D
Sep
26
comment Pronouncing x in the name of a CD product
@Hellion I'm a geek too, and I've heard it called speed and times in equal measure and hardly ever ecks. shrugs I'd probably opt for speed, although in your example: 48 speed CD-ROM, 2 times compression.
Sep
25
awarded  Critic
Sep
25
answered Word for people who change their opinions easily?
Sep
4
comment “For <xxx> sake” - which variant is more common?
Shouldn't the third option be "for Jesus' sake"? But either way, my vote would (sadly) go for "for f**k's sake", often abbreviated to "ffs" and used very frequently in common language on the internet.
Jul
27
comment A word for something that is both useful and beautiful
@AlbeyAmakiir I love that reference. Am I correct in thinking it implies that anything that is beautiful is intrinsically useful?
Jun
6
accepted Does the term “garbledy gook” have racist origins?
Jun
1
comment Does the term “garbledy gook” have racist origins?
Why did you add that as a comment and not an answer?
Jun
1
asked Does the term “garbledy gook” have racist origins?
Jun
1
answered Correct usage of “persons” (vs. “people”)
May
31
comment A text has an introduction, a body, and a …?
Blurb would be more like a summary or abstract. Plus isn't it a bit colloquial?
May
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Mar
8
awarded  Commentator
Mar
8
comment Change of Number(?) for “does” used with “this”
But why was the word "needs" in the first sentence? Presumably the first sentence could be re-written "This will need to come out eventually.". Is the absence of "will" responsible for the need for the extra "s"?
Feb
29
comment What is the word to describe “the gaining of full control over an ability or power you already have”?
I reluctantly agree with @sam. Absolute control cannot exist without complete understanding, but complete understanding does not necessarily imply absolute control.