284 reputation
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location GB
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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Jan 23 at 10:30

I am weasel!

all of the hats, all of the hats...


Jan
20
comment Why do so many groups of people (marketers, UX, finance) use a 'funnel' as a metaphor
its a coffee filter!
Jan
6
comment Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
@RobWatts Except "Your bananas..." doesn't make sense in that variation because bananas don't have feelings.
Dec
16
comment Word for an object within another object
Yo Dawg! I heard you like words in your words...
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@FumbleFingers The "John is generous" part sets the focus of the sentence to be on Johns contribution rather than the cause. In the OP "Because of these advantages" sets technique X up as better than other techniques implying that the 'larger' applies to it's proportion of contribution to Y. You could completely reverse the meaning saying something like "The research was quite specialised, technique X largely contributed to the understanding of Y."
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce yup but with the word order reversed the modifier 'largely' only applies to the word 'contribution' rather than being part of either side of the sentence so the meaning of the sentence as a whole follows the same pattern as when 'largely' is not in the sentence at all.
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce It isn't ambiguous though because of "Because of these advantages" tacked onto the front which provides the context.
Dec
15
revised Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
added 27 characters in body
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce see my addition
Dec
15
revised Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
added 335 characters in body
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce You can say something is large but you can also say something is significant. Whether the largeness or significance applies absolutely or relatively to something else is an ambiguity that can apply to both terms. Your examples imply that you think something can only be significant or not, that isn't the case.
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce I think you are adding false implications to the use of the word largely then. In this sentence it is a direct synonym for significantly and both words suffer the same ambiguity as to whether they apply to X or Y. Adding a comma or changing the context changes the meaning, using a different word does not. At no point are we saying that the contribution is absolutely large or significant, only in relation to other contributions by X or for Y. No additional meanings of large apply and if they did then why wouldn't significant apply? Please give an example.
Dec
15
revised Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
added 84 characters in body
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
To be more specific then, in England, among people speaking English it is common place.
Dec
15
awarded  Editor
Dec
15
revised Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
added 36 characters in body
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce this is common usage. I see people use it all the time.
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce it isn't ambiguous at all. It would be phrased poorly if it meant anything other than this interpretation!
Dec
15
answered Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
Dec
12
comment What does “and counting” in “Bits of plastic in oceans: 5.25 trillion and counting” mean?
It is more like we are counting the bits of plastic as they come in and we are still counting (so they are still coming in).
Dec
9
comment Is there a saying or proverb for a situation where the weakest party will always lose?
@user3847 no, thats what it means in Japan too. The difference is that they use conformism as a positive. Still nothing to do with this Q