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Apr
21
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
You are misusing this phrase. It means when one person has done something and the people around him unfairly get the same reputation. Whereas the jackal one implies that both are bad but the new one has the appearance of something different.
Apr
20
comment What's the archaic term for the place where swords were made?
@sumelic smithy has different etymologies for the different uses
Apr
19
comment What's the archaic term for the place where swords were made?
@rw-nandemo thats because it is shortened to smithy. Forge is generally used for the hearth itself. Most places called 'something forge' are actually a Pub not a Blacksmith's at all.
Apr
18
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
@Jules he's not detailing a medical condition, the whole point of a euphemism is to downplay the gross details. People can put 2+2 together and get the general idea that he is puking or has diarrhoea, the exact specifics are not important for them to know. Mentioning that its a bug could be relevant but that won't be the case if its from something dodgy he ate.
Mar
7
comment What does “snooze factor eleven" mean?
The idea of factor 11 predates spinal tap, they simply made a joke about it. It is the olde timey version of 110%.
Mar
7
comment What is a one-word synonym for “religious symbol”?
@JEL your opinion does not change reality
Mar
6
comment What is a one-word synonym for “religious symbol”?
@JEL even with your update you are still making assumptions about differences between gram, graph, glyph that are not actually portrayed in your references.
Mar
5
comment What is a one-word synonym for “religious symbol”?
@JEL not one of the sources support your assertion. The sources say a heirogram is a sacred symbol, they do not say that all sacred symbols are heirograms. A Mercedes is a car, that does not mean all cars are Mercedes. You are making the same error in logic. Hence why I said this answer was misleading in the first place.
Mar
5
comment What is a one-word synonym for “religious symbol”?
@mazura the point is that a symbol is only a heirogram if it is written not in physical or any other form. 'Symbol' is a general term that can not only mean when its written down but also carved or a physical item like a cross on a necklace too. 'Heirogram' does not apply to all of those situations.
Mar
4
comment What is a one-word synonym for “religious symbol”?
I think this answer is misleading. A hierogram is a sacred symbol but not all sacred symbols are hierograms.
Jan
1
comment Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?
I think it's ok because we are less reliant on catchphrases than our US friends and it makes perfectly good sense. However that doesn't mean it is the norm, which some people seem to have been mislead to believe. Just like "enjoy your birthday" isn't wrong but it's not the saying.
Jan
1
comment Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?
Another example, the song "We Wish You a Merry Christmas" written in England before 1935
Jan
1
comment Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?
British people don't generally use happy christmas instead of merry, @blazemonger 's link that says that is quite simply wrong. The queen says happy in her speech because she personally doesn't like the word merry. But you can't get more British than Charles Dickens who referred to our use of merry in the christmas carol in 1840 something.
Dec
23
comment Do we pronounce a “t” sound in negative contractions “n't”
@Araucaria maybe you are unable to discern the subtlety but it is definately not missed out entirely
Dec
23
comment Do we pronounce a “t” sound in negative contractions “n't”
@Araucaria the Queen doesn't miss the t off.
Dec
18
comment What do you call a “cropped image” on a website?
A thumbnail often highlights the focal point of a larger photo that you want to convey based on context. Eg. Picking out one face from a group of people. The detail picked out can vary according to use and often there can be multiple thumbnails highlighting different parts of the pic. Eg. each person. So I think @TripeHound the idea that it must represent the whole photo is outdated thinking and does not match current real world usage of the term.
Dec
8
comment Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”
The difference is subtle but for me whinge is more of a complaint and whine is more of a noise. But definately both used in UK
Nov
16
comment How do I express “clockwisality”?
@JohnLawler the word is anti-clockwise
Sep
16
comment What is the name of this symbol “♪”?
@CJDennis because they added "not coloured inside" in an edit.
Aug
18
comment Alternative idiom to “phone it in”
I'm not being picky, you are using it incorrectly. I know that from general usage in literature. I may not be able to find something right now which proves you wrong undoubtedly but please consider the advice.