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Jan
1
comment Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?
I think it's ok because we are less reliant on catchphrases than our US friends and it makes perfectly good sense. However that doesn't mean it is the norm, which some people seem to have been mislead to believe. Just like "enjoy your birthday" isn't wrong but it's not the saying.
Jan
1
comment Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?
Another example, the song "We Wish You a Merry Christmas" written in England before 1935
Jan
1
comment Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?
British people don't generally use happy christmas instead of merry, @blazemonger 's link that says that is quite simply wrong. The queen says happy in her speech because she personally doesn't like the word merry. But you can't get more British than Charles Dickens who referred to our use of merry in the christmas carol in 1840 something.
Dec
23
comment Do we pronounce a “t” sound in negative contractions “n't”
@Araucaria maybe you are unable to discern the subtlety but it is definately not missed out entirely
Dec
23
comment Do we pronounce a “t” sound in negative contractions “n't”
@Araucaria the Queen doesn't miss the t off.
Dec
18
comment What do you call a “cropped image” on a website?
A thumbnail often highlights the focal point of a larger photo that you want to convey based on context. Eg. Picking out one face from a group of people. The detail picked out can vary according to use and often there can be multiple thumbnails highlighting different parts of the pic. Eg. each person. So I think @TripeHound the idea that it must represent the whole photo is outdated thinking and does not match current real world usage of the term.
Dec
8
comment Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”
The difference is subtle but for me whinge is more of a complaint and whine is more of a noise. But definately both used in UK
Nov
16
comment How do I express “clockwisality”?
@JohnLawler the word is anti-clockwise
Sep
16
comment What is the name of this symbol “♪”?
@CJDennis because they added "not coloured inside" in an edit.
Aug
18
comment Alternative idiom to “phone it in”
I'm not being picky, you are using it incorrectly. I know that from general usage in literature. I may not be able to find something right now which proves you wrong undoubtedly but please consider the advice.
Aug
16
comment Alternative idiom to “phone it in”
You seem to be misinterpreting what it says. 'act', 'appear' and 'impression' all imply that it is about what you show not what you actually are. You still have your worse foot even when you are hiding it at the back. Its hard to find a clear cut citation that might convince you but common usage in books is often after a failure or dissapointment, to suggest putting up a front and moving on.
Aug
15
comment Alternative idiom to “phone it in”
idioms.thefreedictionary.com/put+best+foot+forward If you search on the meaning/origins it doesn't mean try your best, it means appear at your best. The subtle difference does seem to be lost for a lot of people, it is often misused the way you say too.
Aug
14
comment Alternative idiom to “phone it in”
that saying doesn't really fit as it applies to first impressions and showing your strengths rather than effort in general
Jul
28
comment One word for playing on the violin with a bow
@karen musical notation is always in italian. So while bowing is the layman's term, arco is the musician's term.
Jul
27
revised What word means people who blindly follow the routine?
added 74 characters in body
Jul
27
answered What word means people who blindly follow the routine?
Jun
5
comment km plural or singular, “out of which 100 km is motorway”
It is valid english. The IS refers to the length of the road network which is one singular value. The ARE refers to the multiple roads which comprise that total length. In both cases it is the measured object that determines the pluralarity rather than the unit of measurement.
Apr
8
comment Is there any English word in which “ph” is not pronounced as “f”?
I don't think this worked very well. Many of these words DO have an f sound in them! Eg. Alphonse. Also do compound words really count?
Apr
8
comment Is there any English word in which “ph” is not pronounced as “f”?
I don't know how people would expect /f/ in Stephen to be pronounced that differently than a /v/ anyway, I think it is more in the ear of the beholder than the person saying it. Say them fast and they are identical, it is clear how people misheard and one became the other in their mind.
Mar
6
comment “Just sayin” what?
It seems to have morphed into this from more of a "don't shoot the messenger" original meaning