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  • 43 votes cast
Apr
8
comment Is there any English word in which “ph” is not pronounced as “f”?
I don't think this worked very well. Many of these words DO have an f sound in them! Eg. Alphonse. Also do compound words really count?
Apr
8
comment Is there any English word in which “ph” is not pronounced as “f”?
I don't know how people would expect /f/ in Stephen to be pronounced that differently than a /v/ anyway, I think it is more in the ear of the beholder than the person saying it. Say them fast and they are identical, it is clear how people misheard and one became the other in their mind.
Mar
6
comment “Just sayin” what?
It seems to have morphed into this from more of a "don't shoot the messenger" original meaning
Feb
9
comment Origins of “turn over in his grave”?; “turn over in her grave”? etc., etc
People were buried face down as a sign of shame or disrespect. The significance of the saying is that they turn once to end up face down because you have disgraced them, spinning or turning multiple times is just misspeak.
Feb
1
comment Does code run in or on a thread?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit no, that is what you are doing. In a CPU a thread is only a series of code, absolutely nothing else.
Feb
1
comment Does code run in or on a thread?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit If I am writing software for a car and I have a class called car which has all the properties and methods that interact with it, the class is still distinct from the actual physical car. Likewise with threads.
Jan
31
comment Does code run in or on a thread?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Its not nitpicking I think you just have an incorrect mental model of what a thread is. And tbh that is vital to which word is appropriate for the OP
Jan
30
comment Does code run in or on a thread?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit A thread object in a programming language holds properties about a thread, but it is not the thread itself.
Jan
30
comment Does code run in or on a thread?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit there are other objects that describe the thread, but they are not the thread itself
Jan
30
comment Does code run in or on a thread?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I don't know if you are joking or trying to be too clever. By definition it is a thread of code, just like a pile of apples. The term does not describe any type of container or processor. Code is the only thing that be's a thread. :)
Jan
30
comment Does code run in or on a thread?
The code runs as a background thread.
Jan
20
comment Why do so many groups of people (marketers, UX, finance) use a 'funnel' as a metaphor
its a coffee filter!
Jan
6
comment Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
@RobWatts Except "Your bananas..." doesn't make sense in that variation because bananas don't have feelings.
Dec
16
comment Word for an object within another object
Yo Dawg! I heard you like words in your words...
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@FumbleFingers The "John is generous" part sets the focus of the sentence to be on Johns contribution rather than the cause. In the OP "Because of these advantages" sets technique X up as better than other techniques implying that the 'larger' applies to it's proportion of contribution to Y. You could completely reverse the meaning saying something like "The research was quite specialised, technique X largely contributed to the understanding of Y."
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce yup but with the word order reversed the modifier 'largely' only applies to the word 'contribution' rather than being part of either side of the sentence so the meaning of the sentence as a whole follows the same pattern as when 'largely' is not in the sentence at all.
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce It isn't ambiguous though because of "Because of these advantages" tacked onto the front which provides the context.
Dec
15
revised Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
added 27 characters in body
Dec
15
comment Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
@itsbruce see my addition
Dec
15
revised Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?
added 335 characters in body