315 reputation
17
bio website twitter.com/EvanHarper
location London, Canada
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 2 days ago

I am Evan Harper, a student developer. I am mostly a .NET programmer at the moment, but at various times I've been into C, Java, Python, JavaScript, and others. I enjoy history, chess, beer, sushi, and Team Fortress 2. :-)

Education: Fanshawe College.

Current employer (July 2013): TC Media.

All opinions are mine alone.


Jul
7
comment What does “the rational you had probably taken a powder” mean?
Before now is not a good definition of in the first place. Google's scraper is confused; the source it points to does not define it that way.
Dec
7
answered Word for rhetorical style where different arguments get progressively weaker
Oct
27
awarded  Yearling
Sep
30
comment Is there a word to describe the unintelligent/streety way some people talk?
If you're an awful person.
Sep
30
comment Is there a word to describe the unintelligent/streety way some people talk?
Absolutely every one "drops" certain letters and "combines" certain words. Try saying "gas station" with a full-on glottal stop in there and think about how weird it sounds -- the standard pronunciation is "ga-station."
Sep
30
comment How to say that the phone is held between shoulder and ear?
-1 for another one of these "what is a phrase for [x y z]" questions that offers no explanation of what's wrong with just saying "[x y z]," or how we are to know that our answer won't be rejected for the same vague reason.
Sep
27
awarded  Commentator
Sep
27
comment Phenomenon of overused and popular words
You have defined cliché, as the current top answer points out. But your examples are not clichés - they are, respectively, two filler words and an intensifier. They both happen to be frowned upon by certain language peevers, but that's not a function of overuse, faddishness, or "loss" of meaning. No one is going around wondering what the sentence "He was totally literal at all times, like a robot" means because "totally," "literal," and "like" also happen to be used in ways that irritate pedants.
Aug
29
comment No possibilities are ruled out
You want a quick way to say that "no possibilities can be ruled out?" How about, "no possibilities can be ruled out?"
Aug
28
awarded  Editor
Aug
28
revised Meaning of “get your head out of your ass”
cf navel-gazing
Aug
28
comment Apostrophe-“s” vs “of ”
@Cerberus I expect that declarations of fact should be, well, factual. It is easy to find ngrams contradicting these putative rules: The engine's fuel, the bomb's blast, the edge of sanity, the sake of humanity... even his own example, the cliff's edge, is totally wrong, if patterns of usage are any guide.
Aug
28
comment Meaning of “get your head out of your ass”
@FumbleFingers I don't know, I actually found it surprisingly hard to find a "legitimate" reference, as opposed to say UrbanDictionary, for this one.
Aug
28
awarded  Critic
Aug
28
answered Meaning of “get your head out of your ass”
Aug
28
comment Meaning of “get your head out of your ass”
This answer is insufficiently general. For instance, it would make sense to say, "He has his head so far up his ass that he didn't know his own sister had gotten married," although his sister's marriage is presumably not a problem.
Aug
28
comment Apostrophe-“s” vs “of ”
I appreciate that you have a source, but this advice is simultaneously so complicated and so vague ("other fixed expressions," personifications, etc) that it strikes me as somewhere close to useless, and I frankly expect that most of these prescriptions cannot be supported but by opinion.
Aug
23
comment Best word for “unable to change”
Even if the word "unadaptable" did not appear in any dictionary, it would still be perfectly legitimate (as long as something like "inadaptable" wasn't already in wide use.) It is totally acceptable to construct words in this manner.
Aug
8
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
6
comment “You just can't” vs. “you can't just ”
I agree with this answer, but I would note that in common speech, or even in writing, the subtle difference in meaning here may not even be intentional. Certainly it would be easy for me to write "just can't" when I probably meant "can't just," and vice versa.