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Sep
15
comment Word for a body of water that is sufficiently populated with fish and worthy of fishing in
@Robotnik At least in my experience in the USA, "brimming" is something one uses for liquid--a cup brimming with tea, eyes brimming with tears. The implication is "about to overflow its container. If the fish were not in water and were about to fill their container, then I could see brimming. :)
Sep
15
comment Word for a body of water that is sufficiently populated with fish and worthy of fishing in
@Robotnik In the case of fish, brimming would be a very strange term to replace teeming.
Sep
8
revised Is there a phrase or idiom for “being defeated by future problems”?
added 277 characters in body
Sep
4
answered Is there a phrase or idiom for “being defeated by future problems”?
Aug
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
accepted Correct usage of *which* and *that*
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
Of the two listed "duplicates", only one actually is. The other is too specific to be a duplicate of this more general question. And yes, I searched many different ways to try to find the answer on the site before asking...
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
But if which can be restrictive, how you do succinctly say the latter, "I only eat chocolate chip cookies. My mother happens to make such things."?
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
It's an artificial distinction that's not required--you're right. I had just spent several years thinking this way, so it's hard to break the habit. "I only eat chocolate chip cookies that my mother makes" is quite different from "I only eat chocolate chip cookies, which my mother makes." It's useful to have a restrictive word and a nonrestrictive word.
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
I think saying "Which cannot be used in any restrictive sense" is patently false. It can be used, but with different constructions such as in which or that which. As a drop-in replacement for that (when used in its restrictive sense), it seems less apt to me.
Aug
21
comment How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
I most definitely don't put emphasis on from. If you make it directly from that bottle, then from takes on emphasis.
Aug
21
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
I appreciate the time spent to post this answer and its detail. I'm curious about the apparent annoyance about my (seeming) misconception--it was just a question! The resources you picked seem particularly vitriolic about the topic. Also, I didn't find the use of in which to be compelling or clever--clearly, in which is restrictive, but I wasn't asking about it. Also, when that is not correct, which must obviously be used. My question was not about those cases.
Aug
21
asked Correct usage of *which* and *that*
Aug
21
suggested suggested edit on Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?
Aug
18
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
@John I can see your perspective and appreciate it. Perhaps I will be more sensitized to this issue, now. If I worked in retail, I probably would be incensed to have my greeting and farewell salutations mandated--it would make it very hard for me to be genuine, something that I value to the utmost.
Aug
17
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
It's precisely the employee who doesn't know how to genuinely smile or greet that needs the guidelines. You might suggest that companies shouldn't hire people who don't genuinely smile and greet, and you might be right. However, some positions simply can't pay enough to be that selective. There are many jobs I could do superlatively (including greeting people genuinely), but I have skills that higher-paying jobs require, and so I'm not available to the customer-facing workforce. What I'm getting at is: when dealing with corporate business, be prepared for somewhat impersonal interactions.
Aug
15
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
When a less socially-skilled employee knows exactly what he must say and does so, knowing that this is what's expected of him and will be considered to be good performance by his boss, that's a win for him. Perhaps allowing formulaic pleasantries to "work" on you could be an act of generosity to the employee (while still, on principle, spitting in the face of the company that mandates them).
Aug
15
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
@WS2 I think I can appreciate what you're driving at. I, too, hate false sincerity, and am actually a very transparent and earnest person. On the other side of the coin, however, corporations that reach a certain size fall easily into exercising control, because the 1% of employees that do not behave properly when given free reign to express themselves sincerely becomes a significant absolute number (say, 364 incidents of rudeness reported by customers last year), and at that point mandating the exact words of the pleasantry becomes hard to avoid.
Aug
15
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
@WS2 Holding it out to be sincere and genuine is exactly what they are not doing. It is most often mere signalling protocol, and it is unfortunate that those who refuse to engage in (or understand the proper place of) standard social signalling will likely encounter social problems throughout life. I personally don't like "thank you for your patience", since how does the person know I didn't wait impatiently, but I understand it, and certainly have no problem with "thank you for waiting".
Aug
15
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
@WS2 Social pleasantries are a kind of lubrication between people, all of whom have different values, thoughts, feelings, intentions, and experiences. They exist to promote harmony. They are a kind of signalling that enables people to not treat others as mere objects but respect them as people, deserving of standard signalling protocol. If someone says, "How's it going" do you not understand he is looking for "Great, and you?", not personal details of your difficult life? If you allow normal social lubrication to be a major irritant, you are going to suffer in life.