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Apr
27
awarded  Pundit
Apr
24
comment What do you call the phenomenon where you suddenly feel that a word's spelling is wrong?
No, this doesn't really happen to me. My sense for misspelled words is almost unerring.
Apr
14
comment Does “renege” have any racial overtones, or is it otherwise offensive?
@ab2 Some people live in fear. Others don't. Using a word others aren't familiar with is never something to apologize for, if it is truly the right word for the situation and not done for shock value. I don't need my boss's guidance on "how to educate people". The ignorant need to suck up, not the erudite. Sure, we all play the political game and bow to appearance over substance and all that—but simple English words that an educated person ought to know? No. We have to draw the line somewhere.
Apr
9
comment What is the equivalent of Persian idiom “When the reed blooms”?
@punkerplunk I think that's just plain silly!
Apr
8
comment Why do we say “I would appreciate it if you paid in cash,” but not “I will appreciate it if you pay in cash”?
Saying "I will appreciate it if you pay in cash" implies that the appreciation, or rather desire, for this action (of so paying) does not exist now but will only exist in the future. That is not the intent of the speaker. Instead, the speaker is saying I appreciate now (or desire now, but expressed in a less forceful way) your consideration of paying in cash. The merchant is not really speaking about potential future actions or responses, but instead indicating his current state.
Apr
8
comment What is the equivalent of Persian idiom “When the reed blooms”?
@punkerplunk Wouldn't it be weird to take such a phrase so precisely, when it is patently not precise and could refer to 28, 29, 30, or 31 weeks? It seems so obvious to me to be a figure of speech and not intended to have this kind of precision. Like the security guard at a museum that told a visitor the dinosaur was 65,000,005 years old--since the guard had started work 5 years before, and at that time, he'd been told the dinosaur was 65,000,000 years old...
Apr
7
comment Looking for a word to describe ineffectual people who would like to be effective
Blowhard comes close.
Apr
3
comment Is there a word for the totality of existence?
I think the best answer is reality. It's even a better word than existence. Since this question is closed, I can't make this an answer.
Mar
15
revised Idiom or proverb that implies “ the evidence contradicts what you claim”
added 247 characters in body
Mar
14
answered Idiom or proverb that implies “ the evidence contradicts what you claim”
Mar
3
comment Is there an English word or phrase that means “intending to help and hurting instead?”
His actions backfired, and, "Sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice" comes to mind.
Feb
20
revised English equivalent of “c'est gratuit”
added 2 characters in body
Feb
18
comment English equivalent of “c'est gratuit”
In that case, perhaps you could elaborate on this sense to that the OP is aware that your proposed answer has these connotations beyond the dictionary-definition denotation.
Feb
18
answered English equivalent of “c'est gratuit”
Feb
18
comment English equivalent of “c'est gratuit”
I disagree. In my experience, in common parlance "that was uncalled-for" is a reprimand not stating that the action was neutral or zero, but that it was negative. It's strongly saying "You shouldn't have done that", not the more neutral "that was not strictly required." Also, when quoting a resource, please include plain text with the source's name (this is per the site rules, because SE content can be syndicated in contexts where links are gone).
Feb
14
revised Single word for “Someone who's in on a secret”
added 135 characters in body
Feb
14
comment Single word for “Someone who's in on a secret”
I confess it's not usual but they would all understand you!
Feb
12
revised Single word for “Someone who's in on a secret”
added 156 characters in body
Feb
10
answered Single word for “Someone who's in on a secret”
Feb
5
revised Term for: Simultaneous rare experience/occurrence
Grammar and spelling