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seen Nov 21 at 20:52

Nov
20
revised Is there a phrase or idiom for “being defeated by future problems”?
added 188 characters in body
Nov
19
revised fait accompli – to italicize, or not to italicize
Added sensible link text to giant URL.
Nov
19
suggested suggested edit on fait accompli – to italicize, or not to italicize
Sep
29
comment Is there any “swearword” in English not associated with excrements, the genitals, sexual activity or religion?
I only commented because this is english.se. Will delete this comment soon.
Sep
27
comment Word that means 'most common example'?
Not exactly the meaning you're looking for, but I thought I'd mention exemplar as in "A square is a perfect exemplar of a generic shape."
Sep
25
awarded  Yearling
Sep
15
comment Word for a body of water that is sufficiently populated with fish and worthy of fishing in
@Robotnik At least in my experience in the USA, "brimming" is something one uses for liquid--a cup brimming with tea, eyes brimming with tears. The implication is "about to overflow its container. If the fish were not in water and were about to fill their container, then I could see brimming. :)
Sep
15
comment Word for a body of water that is sufficiently populated with fish and worthy of fishing in
@Robotnik In the case of fish, brimming would be a very strange term to replace teeming.
Sep
8
revised Is there a phrase or idiom for “being defeated by future problems”?
added 277 characters in body
Sep
4
answered Is there a phrase or idiom for “being defeated by future problems”?
Aug
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
accepted Correct usage of *which* and *that*
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
Of the two listed "duplicates", only one actually is. The other is too specific to be a duplicate of this more general question. And yes, I searched many different ways to try to find the answer on the site before asking...
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
But if which can be restrictive, how you do succinctly say the latter, "I only eat chocolate chip cookies. My mother happens to make such things."?
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
It's an artificial distinction that's not required--you're right. I had just spent several years thinking this way, so it's hard to break the habit. "I only eat chocolate chip cookies that my mother makes" is quite different from "I only eat chocolate chip cookies, which my mother makes." It's useful to have a restrictive word and a nonrestrictive word.
Aug
22
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
I think saying "Which cannot be used in any restrictive sense" is patently false. It can be used, but with different constructions such as in which or that which. As a drop-in replacement for that (when used in its restrictive sense), it seems less apt to me.
Aug
21
comment How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
I most definitely don't put emphasis on from. If you make it directly from that bottle, then from takes on emphasis.
Aug
21
comment Correct usage of *which* and *that*
I appreciate the time spent to post this answer and its detail. I'm curious about the apparent annoyance about my (seeming) misconception--it was just a question! The resources you picked seem particularly vitriolic about the topic. Also, I didn't find the use of in which to be compelling or clever--clearly, in which is restrictive, but I wasn't asking about it. Also, when that is not correct, which must obviously be used. My question was not about those cases.
Aug
21
asked Correct usage of *which* and *that*
Aug
21
suggested suggested edit on Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?