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Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
@JakeRegier Maybe I'm wrong? Maybe you could find something useful there? Maybe the looseness around beginner vs. advanced beginner isn't material and they're not using it improperly? Maybe Wikipedia isn't the canonical source of knowledge?
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
@Jake Most people using the Dreyfus model drop the word advanced from advanced beginner.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
@bib Though you can't deny that your resistance to that notion is itself the pursuit of correctness or the right thing. Back on topic, there may not be a right answer to the given question, but there are certainly wrong answers, and I would contend that just saying virgin without explaining that you're addressing a broader inquiry than the specific one of the question is in fact a wrong answer! :)
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
Readers may be interested to consult the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
This is very strange. I have never once seen novice imply greater competence than beginner (native English speaker). This use of novice as the lowest level is even formalized in some professions that use the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
Given the question, "_____, Beginner, Intermediate, Expert" I would still maintain that virgin is the wrong term. I didn't say it's wrong at all times, I just felt that your brief answer did not go into the context surrounding skillful usage of virgin and so my comment was an attempt to repair that a bit. Feel free to elaborate on when virgin would be the best word to use and when novice would, and I'll vote you up.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
This meaning is more slang. Novice is the right term as given in another answer.
Jul
23
comment What's a negative word for “subtle”?
Pernicious is in the question. Perhaps that's why it came to your mind...
Jul
20
comment I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
@rogermue I disagree with your logic. A question doesn't automatically become nonsense just because the answer is "both." (Or, more accurately, one in formal writing and one for other situations.)
Jul
18
revised I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
added 1 character in body
Jul
17
answered Noun for something that is randomly chosen?
Jul
17
comment Is 'I f*cked the dog' an actual idiom and are there alternatives
@MatthewRead Okay, I concede that people use it, but it doesn't make sense. It just makes me think "jerking what around?" And around isn't a very good preposition for the action being suggested. It seems to me an ignorant portmanteau or malapropism combining "jerking off" and "screwing around."
Jul
16
comment Is 'I f*cked the dog' an actual idiom and are there alternatives
In my experience "jerking around" is incorrect, it would be "jerking off". To be "jerked around" means to be forced by another to go through meaningless steps (that on the surface have the appearance of legitimacy or effectiveness) with the purpose of delaying or blocking one's own aims.
Jul
16
comment Is 'I f*cked the dog' an actual idiom and are there alternatives
None of these are mild enough to risk offending others, and care should be taken in professional environments lest one experience negative repercussion from careless usage.
Jul
10
answered What's an expression for a cunningly-fake friend?
Jul
9
comment Pronunciation of “hypokeimenon”
@Cerberus I think it was a book by L.E. Modesitt, Jr.
May
22
comment Meaning and origin of “bite the bullet”
And simultaneously get yourself a nice little case of lead poisoning to help you recover faster!
Apr
22
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
17
awarded  Famous Question
Dec
16
revised Completing something just to finish it despite lack of interest - is called …?
Corrected spelling of a pretty important word.