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revised A verb that means “to prove someone is guilty of a crime”
added 92 characters in body
Aug
27
comment Should acronyms that are actually hidden plurals be treated as plural?
@choster P.S. Is it not pedantry to lecture others on how not to be pedants or pretentious pedants? Pedant: "a person who is excessively concerned with minor details and rules or with displaying academic learning." Why do you criticize me simply for wanting to know the right way? Aren't you displaying your own academic learning in doing so? Isn't your scoffing at pedants just another level of excessive concern with rules (just, the ones about not displaying excessive concern)?
Aug
27
comment Should acronyms that are actually hidden plurals be treated as plural?
@choster I apologize deeply if the amount of thinking I like to do about my language is more than you think is the fitting or proper amount (morally or rationally speaking). I do not like PIN number, ATM machine, or Please RSVP for the simple reason that I do like to think about my language and use it intentionally. Regarding your last sentence: I don't agree. Principles does not refer to a governing body but the set of practices themselves. It's more like saying The Golden Rule regulation, which is just plain silly.
Aug
26
comment Should acronyms that are actually hidden plurals be treated as plural?
You've reminded me of RPM as well. I've heard "500 RPMs" and it sure rubbed me the wrong way! But "RsPM" isn't right, either. :)
Aug
26
asked Should acronyms that are actually hidden plurals be treated as plural?
Aug
26
revised A verb that means “to prove someone is guilty of a crime”
added 131 characters in body
Aug
26
comment A verb that means “to prove someone is guilty of a crime”
@JanusBahsJacquet I'm not forgetting it at all because my analysis is not on the eventual disposition of an accused person within the court system, but on the meaning and ambiguity or clarity of particular sentences. Within the given sentences, the misinterpreted proof angle is not an issue. All proof, all statements, all claims and propositions, could be mistaken. if what you're saying really is an issue, then the current top answer, "proof that implicated" would also be completely ambiguous. No, words mean their usual/normal meaning in sentences until modifiers or context change them.
Aug
26
comment A verb that means “to prove someone is guilty of a crime”
@Mari-LouA For an innocent person, then there is no proof they committed the crime—at least, not legitimate proof. And, the word proof by itself should be understood to mean "legitimate proof". Therefore, sentences 1 and 2 are completely unambiguous. An innocent person can only be nailed or incriminated by misleading, false, trumped-up, faked, or otherwise invalid proof!
Aug
26
answered A verb that means “to prove someone is guilty of a crime”
Aug
17
comment What does “Call things by their name” mean?
@EdwinAshworth My hair was literally literally on fire!
Aug
3
answered Is there an adverb in English, meaning “with an interest”?
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
@JakeRegier Maybe I'm wrong? Maybe you could find something useful there? Maybe the looseness around beginner vs. advanced beginner isn't material and they're not using it improperly? Maybe Wikipedia isn't the canonical source of knowledge?
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
@Jake Most people using the Dreyfus model drop the word advanced from advanced beginner.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
@bib Though you can't deny that your resistance to that notion is itself the pursuit of correctness or the right thing. Back on topic, there may not be a right answer to the given question, but there are certainly wrong answers, and I would contend that just saying virgin without explaining that you're addressing a broader inquiry than the specific one of the question is in fact a wrong answer! :)
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
Readers may be interested to consult the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
This is very strange. I have never once seen novice imply greater competence than beginner (native English speaker). This use of novice as the lowest level is even formalized in some professions that use the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
Given the question, "_____, Beginner, Intermediate, Expert" I would still maintain that virgin is the wrong term. I didn't say it's wrong at all times, I just felt that your brief answer did not go into the context surrounding skillful usage of virgin and so my comment was an attempt to repair that a bit. Feel free to elaborate on when virgin would be the best word to use and when novice would, and I'll vote you up.
Jul
29
comment Term for a person with absolutely zero knowledge of a topic
This meaning is more slang. Novice is the right term as given in another answer.
Jul
23
comment What's a negative word for “subtle”?
Pernicious is in the question. Perhaps that's why it came to your mind...
Jul
20
comment I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
@rogermue I disagree with your logic. A question doesn't automatically become nonsense just because the answer is "both." (Or, more accurately, one in formal writing and one for other situations.)