Reputation
4,006
Top tag
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
2 28 59
Impact
~460k people reached

Aug
1
comment Etymology of “horny”
I got as far as "to have the horn", as you could see from the question, but couldn't get any further than that.
Jul
15
comment What is the difference between initialize and initiate?
As the word is virtually nonexistent in Google NGrams before 1950, I suspect it's only used in computing.
Jul
8
comment Idiom for someone who buys all the best gear to do something before they even have a basic proficiency?
@PieterGeerkens or if you like puns, "More dollars than sense" (sense sounds like "cents").
Jun
27
comment Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?
+1 for yak shaving!
Jun
24
comment Is it offensive or unusual to use “Mongolian” in the sense of race?
I wouldn't use the word "Mongolian" this way, but I came across someone on Skeptics Stack Exchange using it that way last night, and I didn't know if I should advise them not to use such language.
Jun
24
comment Is it offensive or unusual to use “Mongolian” in the sense of race?
I try to avoid confusion by adding a preface about what I'm not referring to, and instead, people think I'm confused. :(
Jun
24
comment Mongoloid with reference to Down's syndrome
A newspaper article about a Mongolian mother who had a child with Down's Syndrome.
Jun
21
comment Is there a verb form of “Extinct”?
Exterminate is what Daleks do. :)
Jun
19
comment Are litotes more common in Australian English?
@TimRomano as crocodiles are more common in Australia than other English-speaking countries, it isn't exactly a fair comparison. Not surprisingly, the first result of a google search is for The NT News.
Jun
5
comment Antonym of nomad
@James "villager" sounds like an antonym of "werewolf" en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mafia_%28party_game%29
Jun
4
comment Antonym of nomad
"Settler" similarly evokes in me thoughts of British settlers in Australia, or similar phenomena happening nowadays.
May
17
comment What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
@Abecedarian as a heads up, I've asked whether the Vietnamese and Japanese phrases are related on the Japanese language stack exchange: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/24360/…
May
16
comment What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
@Mitch is the Pope Catholic?
May
5
comment How is the past tense of “error” spelt in British English?
@Mari-LouA I don't appreciate threats.
May
5
comment How is the past tense of “error” spelt in British English?
@Mari-LouA No, yes.
May
5
comment How is the past tense of “error” spelt in British English?
@Mari-LouA there wasn't a strong consensus that "error" can't be verbed.
May
3
comment Phrases like “Fifth Beatle” or “Fourth estate”
I'm looking for a term describing such phrases, not additional examples.
May
1
comment Difference between “Thanking you” and “Thank you”?
Indian English tends to use "-ing" more often than British English or American English. Maybe that was part of your friend's concern.
Apr
27
comment What is a “hot meal”?
I don't know why this is being closevoted - the only onelook.com match is from the very unreliable Urban Dictionary.
Apr
25
comment What is a word for a person who thinks they are going to fail?
Not an answer, but related term: impostor syndrome