3,163 reputation
1646
bio website andrewjgrimm.wordpress.com
location Sydney, Australia
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen yesterday

I work at the University of New South Wales, where I use Ruby to analyze biological data.

In part of my spare time, I work on fun programming projects. One was trying to analyze what underlies Wikipedia's Get to Philosophy game. I also worked on one called the "Small Eigen Collider".

I'm currently learning Japanese, and I'm an active participant in lang-8.com, a website where you write journal entries in a language you're learning, and get corrected by native speakers of that language. In return, you correct people writing entries in your native language. Recently, I've been asking a few questions prompted by slightly incorrect English I've encountered on lang-8.


Sep
13
comment The usage of “banzai”
@Frank "total commitment" is a good way of putting it.
Sep
13
comment word for A question that needs to be asked again?
A Frequently Asked Question?
Sep
13
comment The usage of “banzai”
@ErikKowal I don't know whether she's writing the book, or merely reading it.
Sep
10
comment Term for something that is supposed to increase safety, but really just increases fear?
Not quite a match, but maybe "State of fear"? (Not the book. The phrase existed before the book did.)
Sep
6
comment Adjective for someone who is really good at cooking or baking and/or bakes frequently
Flagged for being an appalling pun. :)
Sep
3
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
Related question: english.stackexchange.com/questions/96894/…
Aug
30
comment In British English, do you favorite or favourite a post?
Seek.com.au uses "Favourite Searches".
Aug
19
comment What is a “Tamazie party”?
Replacing a long word with a shorter version with "-ie" at the end is a common way of shortening words in Australian English. I didn't know our podean friends did it.
Aug
19
comment “My personal opinion is…” Is it always pointless to use the words “personal” and “personally”?
At first I thought the answer would be "Personally is useless noise", but it turns out that's not the case. +1.
Jul
17
comment Is “I believe x does not equal y” the same as “I don't believe x equals y”
In other languages (such as Japanese), people would only say the equivalent of "I believe x does not equal y", whereas English speakers would frequently say "I don't believe x equals y". This indicates it's not purely about logic, but is also about the English language.
Jul
14
comment Adding “-ing” to a verb ending with a pronounced “e”
I realise I'm asking about the appropriate spelling of a somewhat appropriate gerunding of an inappropriate verbing of an inappropriate form of entertainment, but I couldn't come up with a better example.
Jul
10
comment Why do people say “to be honest”?
Is "awhile" used correctly in this question?
Jun
26
comment Is the word “Galapagos” transferable into adjective and verb to mean “outdated, fossilized” in English?
English language Wikipedia article on Galapagos syndrome: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galápagos_syndrome
Jun
25
comment Should “et al.” be in italics?
@TimLymington the accepted answer of that question has only a single sentence on italicisation of foreign words.
Jun
7
comment Is there a word for “people who are computer illiterate”?
People who have a dislike of technological progress, rather than a dislike of social progress, or humanity in general, can be more precisely called a Luddite.
May
29
comment Differences between “A beautiful photo of an X” and “A photo of a beautiful X”
@JanusBahsJacquet the napalm attack was in Trang Bang. My Lai was the site of a massacre.
May
28
comment An expression or saying meaning “don't celebrate too early”
"I really didn't say everything I said" - Yogi Berra.
May
25
comment What is wrong with the word “performant”?
"Optimal" means "the best". "Performant" doesn't mean that it has the best performance, only that it has good performance. Also, just because something is annoying business-speak or tech-speak, doesn't mean that it's an "invalid" word.
May
9
comment What does “Chinese theater” mean?
@Kris my main concern is whether it has some sort of non-literal, possibly euphemistic meaning.
May
8
comment What do you call those man-made “wooden paths” that are usually found in mountains?
I'd call it a walkway as well, rather than a boardwalk. Just curious, do you use US English, or British or Australian English?