2,952 reputation
1345
bio website andrewjgrimm.wordpress.com
location Sydney, Australia
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 6 hours ago

I work at the University of New South Wales, where I use Ruby to analyze biological data.

In part of my spare time, I work on fun programming projects. One was trying to analyze what underlies Wikipedia's Get to Philosophy game. I also worked on one called the "Small Eigen Collider".

I'm currently learning Japanese, and I'm an active participant in lang-8.com, a website where you write journal entries in a language you're learning, and get corrected by native speakers of that language. In return, you correct people writing entries in your native language. Recently, I've been asking a few questions prompted by slightly incorrect English I've encountered on lang-8.


Jul
17
comment Is “I believe x does not equal y” the same as “I don't believe x equals y”
In other languages (such as Japanese), people would only say the equivalent of "I believe x does not equal y", whereas English speakers would frequently say "I don't believe x equals y". This indicates it's not purely about logic, but is also about the English language.
Jul
14
comment Adding “-ing” to a verb ending with a pronounced “e”
I realise I'm asking about the appropriate spelling of a somewhat appropriate gerunding of an inappropriate verbing of an inappropriate form of entertainment, but I couldn't come up with a better example.
Jul
10
comment Why do people say “to be honest”?
Is "awhile" used correctly in this question?
Jun
26
comment Is the word “Galapagos” transferable into adjective and verb to mean “outdated, fossilized” in English?
English language Wikipedia article on Galapagos syndrome: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galápagos_syndrome
Jun
25
comment Should “et al.” be in italics?
@TimLymington the accepted answer of that question has only a single sentence on italicisation of foreign words.
Jun
7
comment Is there a word for “people who are computer illiterate”?
People who have a dislike of technological progress, rather than a dislike of social progress, or humanity in general, can be more precisely called a Luddite.
May
29
comment Differences between “A beautiful photo of an X” and “A photo of a beautiful X”
@JanusBahsJacquet the napalm attack was in Trang Bang. My Lai was the site of a massacre.
May
28
comment An expression or saying meaning “don't celebrate too early”
"I really didn't say everything I said" - Yogi Berra.
May
25
comment What is wrong with the word “performant”?
"Optimal" means "the best". "Performant" doesn't mean that it has the best performance, only that it has good performance. Also, just because something is annoying business-speak or tech-speak, doesn't mean that it's an "invalid" word.
May
9
comment What does “Chinese theater” mean?
@Kris my main concern is whether it has some sort of non-literal, possibly euphemistic meaning.
May
8
comment What do you call those man-made “wooden paths” that are usually found in mountains?
I'd call it a walkway as well, rather than a boardwalk. Just curious, do you use US English, or British or Australian English?
May
8
comment Is there a less colloquial word (noun or adjective) to describe an “attention whore”?
+1, I hate the use of the word "whore" as a pejorative.
Apr
29
comment What’s wrong with “After roasting the deer, the hunter extinguished the fire and then searched for a tree to hang it from”?
People mocked UK PM David Cameron the other day for using such a sentence: mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/…
Apr
13
comment Term for main part of desktop computer
Technically correct is not very useful if you aren't understood by other people.
Apr
13
comment Term for main part of desktop computer
This seems to be answering a different question to the one I asked.
Apr
10
comment News article: “Man sentenced for murdering his 10th wife”. What does this mean?
Sounds like clickbait: "An eyecatching link on a website which encourages people to read on. It is often paid for by the advertiser ("Paid" click bait) or generates income based on the number of clicks."
Jan
24
comment What does it mean to have a 'saucy facial expression'?
Would meanings 2 to 4 of the Wiktionary entry for saucy make sense in the context of the comment?
Jan
24
comment “Muppet” in American English
"Million Muppet March" is probably in part a snowclone of the Million Man March
Jan
1
comment What does the fox say?
Not a duplicate of english.stackexchange.com/questions/138272/…
Jan
1
comment Would the phrase “No worries!” be understood outside Australia?
I've come across Japanese people learning English who didn't know it was an Australianism. BTW, there's a Wikipedia article about the phrase!