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Feb
15
comment What is the female version of “phallic”?
@tchrist that sounds phallacious.
Feb
15
awarded  Custodian
Feb
15
accepted “Not so much” at the end of a sentence
Feb
15
asked More general term than “slashdotting”
Feb
11
accepted Has “Kinki” become less common than “Kansai” because of the word “kinky”?
Feb
11
asked “Not so much” at the end of a sentence
Feb
10
comment Has “Kinki” become less common than “Kansai” because of the word “kinky”?
@Robusto how do you define what is properly an English word?
Feb
10
asked Has “Kinki” become less common than “Kansai” because of the word “kinky”?
Feb
4
accepted More specific antonym to “lodger” than “landlord”
Feb
2
answered What's a word for avoiding a question with a generic (fake) answer?
Feb
2
comment Is “cookie” a recent addition to Australian English?
It's actually illegal to refer to them as "Anzac cookies"! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anzac_biscuit#Legal_issues
Feb
2
asked Is “cookie” a recent addition to Australian English?
Jan
27
comment Difference between “no” and “nope”
@FumbleFingers Yahoo! answers is not general reference. It's too unreliable. (The Yahoo! answers link didn't cite any dictionaries, so it wasn't pointing to a general reference)
Jan
26
comment “I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily”
This is talking about being hungry for food, not for sex or something else, right?
Jan
22
awarded  Enthusiast
Jan
20
comment Is “tidbits” Bowdlerized or original?
@StoneyB the two words are not cognates, according to Wiktionary. tit is from Old English titt, whereas teat is from French tette.
Jan
18
asked Is “I'm not racist, but …” more common in Australian English than other dialects?
Jan
17
comment Meaning and etymology of “down with”
Context may be your best bet here.
Jan
17
comment “The proverbial wedding ring”?
@Robusto if the OP tried looking it up, they'd be up the proverbial creek without a paddle. (In this case, I used "proverbial" as a way to avoid saying a certain word, whereas that doesn't apply in this text)
Jan
17
comment More specific antonym to “lodger” than “landlord”
I was after a more specific term, not a more general term.