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Apr
26
accepted polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions
Apr
22
comment polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions
In this question, the behaviour would not be an issue. The question is rather whether "could you tell me", "do you happen to know", "would you mind" and other such structures are used and whether not using them creates a negative impact. I've had a British teacher be very strict on us (students) using them and now I find myself at a loss when my students come back from business trips saying it's useless knowledge because no one uses them.
Apr
22
comment polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions
@Peter Shor: Do you mean that "Where is X, please?" is perfectably acceptable as polite in he US and that the "Could you tell me where X is?" is seen as just extra polite and best reserved for formal situations such as work?
Apr
22
revised polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions
added contextual explanation and clarified my objective
Apr
22
comment polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions
If I may defend the question: my point is about language. I've got students telling me they do not need to use these linguistic structures because when they go abroad (mostly US and UK), they perceive them as unnecessary since no one uses them (according to their perception). My question hinges on how these structures are used and interpreted in different locations because I want to make sure I'm not inventing when I tell them they should be used.
Apr
22
asked polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions
Mar
18
comment Is there a word to describe when someone has super-sensitive hearing?
A friend of mine would have called it 'heightened senses' even if it is only hearing. But he's a Wolverine fan so it doesn't really count, does it?
Mar
4
awarded  Yearling
Feb
20
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
13
comment What do you call someone who always needs to be mentally or physically active?
@Hot Licks: ADHD = Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; the attention deficit part being what I meant as short attention span. As a child (way before the ADHD term was popular) I was diagnosed as hyperactive but there was no reference to my ability to focus.
Feb
12
comment What do you call someone who always needs to be mentally or physically active?
I believe ADHD also includes short attention spans and one can be hyperactive and still be able to focus for long periods.
Feb
12
comment What do you call someone who always needs to be mentally or physically active?
That description makes me think of hiper-activity.
Feb
12
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
6
accepted more unhealthy vs. unhealthier
Feb
5
accepted must vs have to: British usage and academic rules
Feb
3
asked must vs have to: British usage and academic rules
Jan
28
comment more unhealthy vs. unhealthier
@sumelic: Well, in that particular context, it really would have to be unhealthy as it was a comparison of several unhealthy habits. Trying to find 'the unhealthiest of them all' kind of thing
Jan
28
comment more unhealthy vs. unhealthier
@Josh61: by the way, I didn't know that online dictionary, so thanks for mentioning it
Jan
28
comment more unhealthy vs. unhealthier
I consider my question answered by your comments. So if anyone would like to repost their thoughts as a question, I'll be happy to accept it. I really just wanted confirmation on whether the 'more' form was academically accepted since the dictionaries I use don't mention it, (besides the strange idea of the -er being possibly deprecated).
Jan
28
comment more unhealthy vs. unhealthier
@Rathony: yes, mine is realted to those questions, but they do not give me the answer about 'unhealthy', specifically, which is why I went ahead with it.