615 reputation
412
bio website none
location Sweden
age 42
visits member for 3 years
seen Aug 2 at 11:49

I am an amateur with a love for the written word. English is not my native tongue, but I do have considerable knowledge of it.


Oct
24
comment Is it appropriate to omit “will not be”?
Sometimes I wish people did use explanation marks. It would make life easier. =)
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
@FraserOrr I'm sorry, there must be some confusion. You are talking about how it is now, 2011. I am talking about the traditional perspective, how it used to be. Like I said in my question: Of course, nowadays, people improvise a lot more, but speaking from a historical perspective.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
Yes, I am a bit surprised that so many people seem to have a hard time understanding it. I don't think it's a hard concept to grasp at all. I'm not sure how to express myself any clearer.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
@onomatomaniak Am I really expressing myself that poorly? If a given name is unisex, then we have no way of knowing whether a surname is meant to be based on the male or female version of the given name. If, for example, "Johan" would have been a unisex name in Sweden, that does not disprove the old Swedish tradition of giving sons a surname based on their father's given name. In much the same way as you cannot say "Paris is a city in Texas.", unless you know which particular "Paris" is being referred to.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
@GEdgar That is a good point.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
If you could incorporate the gender aspect in your answer, it could be a possible answer to my question. It seems a popular opinion here that surnames that can be used as female names today should be considered, which I do not agree with.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
@onomatomaniak It is relevant to the case of the Madison name being a recent invention, though. And as such, perhaps not a good example of an exception to the traditional naming practices.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
@FraserOrr Like I said, unisex names made surnames serve as poor evidence of usage of female names as surnames. Of your list of names, a brief google/wiki lookup showed only 4 names as somewhat uniquely female (Madison, Brooklyn, Lily, Lauren), and 11 definitely unisex. Many of the names clearly had an origin as male names (Addison = "son of adam", Ashley, Aubrey = Albert, Mackenzie).
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
@PeterTaylor Taylor falls into category B, which is to say a unisex name.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
Very interesting, but my question is if this naming convention is restricted to masculine names only?
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
As such, I do not believe I can accept an answer that relies on the female version of unisex names, names invented in recent years (when naming customs have been made significantly more liberal), and also, quite frankly, surnames which are obscure.
Oct
23
comment How can I understand “thirty-seconds of a dollar”?
I did not claim it was a unit of the imperial measurement system, such as feet, inches or bushels. I said that it was a fraction, and I made an assumption that it was coming from a culture that uses Imperial measurements, because it makes no sense coming from a metric culture.
Oct
23
comment How can I understand “thirty-seconds of a dollar”?
"half a kilo" makes sense. "three and a half thirty-seconds of a pound" makes no sense at all.
Oct
23
comment Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
"not entirely uncommon", you say, but A) those seem like some pretty rare surnames, B) I see that many of the names can be given to boys as well, which makes them completely invalid in any comparison.
Oct
23
revised Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
typo
Oct
23
answered How can I understand “thirty-seconds of a dollar”?
Oct
23
asked Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?
Oct
22
comment What's that word to describe “technology becoming invisible over time”?
Rather a long time ago, I saw a documentary where they were researching sound effects for cars, such as a clicking turn signal. With today's electronic equipment, there is no longer any natural sound. So they added one. =)
Oct
20
answered “Advise” vs. “advise that”
Oct
20
comment Meaning of “to believe the impossible”
@Luc1245 You are welcome!