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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 24 votes cast
Apr
6
comment Is it a coincidence when the two things do not coincide?
@jxh I have no idea what I've said that would make that unclear, but let me try... A coincidence is when an unlikely random outcome leads to two things being the same. A ____ is when an unlikely random outcome leads to two things being different. Most of the suggestions so far are the union of those two sets, just words for unlikely outcomes.
Apr
5
comment Is it a coincidence when the two things do not coincide?
All of those seem to be similar in that they also describe coincidences.
Apr
5
comment Is it a coincidence when the two things do not coincide?
Anomaly is a superset of coincidence. I'm looking for anomaly-that-doesnt-involve-coinciding
Apr
5
comment Is it a coincidence when the two things do not coincide?
@DanBron that would include coincidences, though
Jan
14
comment Origin of “let's take it offline”
Thanks, Sven. Your quote from Eric Raymond is the closest to a real answer to this question.
Jan
14
comment Origin of “let's take it offline”
I found this question after encountering this phrase in common use at a new job, having never heard it used this way before. The crazy part is that sometimes you take a conversation "offline" from a face to face meeting to an internet chat room.
Apr
14
comment Why do “supposed” and “expected” both have similar dual meanings of assumed/predicted or obligated?
@JohnLawler I'd wager my education and grasp of the English language is in the top 10%, and I've never heard or seen the word 'deontic' before, nor have I ever heard 'modal' applied to language (only to software dialogs). You're talking about things not covered in many college level courses, let alone middle school (where one might encounter algebra).
Apr
14
comment Why do “supposed” and “expected” both have similar dual meanings of assumed/predicted or obligated?
@JohnLawler expecting me to know the words "modal" and "deontic" when searching for an answer to this problem is ridiculous.
Apr
14
comment Why do “supposed” and “expected” both have similar dual meanings of assumed/predicted or obligated?
@JohnLawler that's an excellent answer. Why post as a comment instead of an answer?
Sep
16
comment Meaning of “nine-to-five kind of person”?
I've never heard this phrase used in the context of avoiding overtime or work/life separation. In my experience, it has always referred to the type of job being a "normal" job, rather than something interesting or unpredictable.
Jul
7
comment What does “vanilla” mean in the context of gaming?
Battlegrounds added new zones, new game mechanics, new user interface elements. In what way was it not an expansion pack?
Jul
7
comment What does “vanilla” mean in the context of gaming?
Battlegrounds was the first expansion pack.
May
7
comment What does Twain mean by “tares” in the last sentence in a letter to Walt Whitman?
@MichaelOwenSartin tares probably are legumes... that doesn't stop them from looking like wheat in a field in a certain state of ripeness.
May
22
comment There is/are for multiple subjects
@RegDwighт I'm not telling him to rearrange the sentence. I am pointing out that the answer to his question about verbe selection is more apparent in the rearranged sentence. rearrange -> choose verb -> unrearrange with chosen verb.
May
21
comment There is/are for multiple subjects
@RegDwighт the meaning of the sentence isn't changed by the rearrangement. Both orderings indicate "those fruit exist [in that place]".
May
13
comment who or whom in this context?
@RegDwighт John got the joke...
May
13
comment who or whom in this context?
Prepositions are never good words to end sentences with.
Apr
16
comment Why is there a comma in “Man discusses his, wife's experience”
@TimLymington ahh, you mean the difference in "his, his wife's" and "his, wife's". I thought you meant the still-there "his" could also be removed.
Apr
16
comment Why is there a comma in “Man discusses his, wife's experience”
his can't ever be omitted without losing information, in this type of sentence (fragment)
Nov
9
comment What is the role of the single quote sign in Hebrew transliteration?
I'm not posting an answer since I don't know the terminology, but it indicates a break in pronunciation. Shva has one syllable, Sh'va has two.