Reputation
886
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
5 18
Impact
~8k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 117 votes cast
May
21
awarded  Popular Question
May
7
comment Single word that unambigously describes the product of folding
Bravo Zulu, sir, for including a pic of Wile E. Coyote in an answer to a mathematically-themed question posted on an English help forum.
May
7
comment Single word that unambigously describes the product of folding
+1 Yes, it is the already established term: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/manifold or mathworld.wolfram.com/Manifold.html. A 2-D Manifold could also be called a surface. To the OP: you could also seek further clarify on Mathematics.SE
Apr
23
comment Meaning of “lead” in the context of knots/ knot tying
As an afterthought, even though I have accepted this, do you happen to have any sources/ citations?
Apr
23
accepted Meaning of “lead” in the context of knots/ knot tying
Apr
23
comment Meaning of “lead” in the context of knots/ knot tying
A picture may be worth a thousand words, but holding the thing in your hands is worth a billion. I tied each knot in a long small cord, with the opposite end secured to a table leg. I then put both hands through the loop and gently pulled back. The difference is very subtle but noticeable. The Bowline resists more on the "running end" side, whereas the Angler's Loop provides very little difference.
Apr
23
awarded  Curious
Apr
22
comment Usage of 'to' in a sentence
There are three uses of "to" in that sentence. Which one(s) are you concerned about?
Apr
22
revised Meaning of “lead” in the context of knots/ knot tying
added 2 characters in body
Apr
22
asked Meaning of “lead” in the context of knots/ knot tying
Feb
25
comment “choice words” meaning
It is an idiom that refers to vulgar or obscene language. That is, "choice words" are similar to "swear words." If I can find a reference, I will provide as an answer.
Feb
13
comment Is calling someone “old school”- offensive/derogatory?
Related, but not duplicate: english.stackexchange.com/a/131688/13804
Feb
2
comment What is the most “hardworking” letter in the English alphabet?
'When I make a word do a lot of work like that,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'I always pay it extra.' Ah, for poor letter e, overworked yet underpaid.
Feb
2
comment I don't have a ___ in this ___ (saying)
@Erik: I don't think so. "I don't have a dog in this hunt" means I do not have any vested interest; whereas "That dog won't hunt" means the object under consideration is worn out, past its prime, not worth the price. The only relation is that the words 'dog' and 'hunt' are used in both.
Jan
30
comment Is there an abbreviation to denote "f***k You?
Military persons will usually comprehend "foxtrot uniform" Not sure how well it translates outside the military, however. Also more of a euphemism than an abbreviation, which is why I offer as a comment and not an answer.
Dec
29
comment Can a sport team “clinch” a championship in the last regular season game?
@J.R. Since no one else has taken a stab, would you be interested in fleshing your comments out into an answer?
Dec
25
revised Does “selfie” refer to the picture's taker, the picture's poster, or both
clarify that the image in question could not have possibly been taken by the subject.
Dec
25
accepted Does “selfie” refer to the picture's taker, the picture's poster, or both
Dec
24
comment Does “selfie” refer to the picture's taker, the picture's poster, or both
Do you have a link/ source for this mocking of CNN?
Dec
24
asked Does “selfie” refer to the picture's taker, the picture's poster, or both