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bio website launchpad.net/…
location United States
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Mar 30 at 10:22

🐌. Native speaker of American English. Linux user. Familiar with several programming languages in the procedural, OO, and functional paradigms.

Link rot is evil. Archive everything. The keyboard is king. Correctness over performance. Canonicalize, normalize, deduplicate. Don't repeat yourself. UTF-8 > UTF-16. Use static typing: good for tooling. Re-use; don't re-invent. Correctness, then clarity, then concision and elegance. Play devil's advocate. First understand opponents' positions.


Mar
15
answered What is the military term for fighting the enemy without permission?
Mar
14
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
5
comment Etymology of “embarrass”?
Interestingly, in Spanish it instead came to mean "pregnant".
Feb
20
answered Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context?
Feb
19
comment Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context?
A good fraction of that list's examples are bogus, though: they're just common collocations. Just because the cerebral cortex is the only cortex the author is aware of doesn't mean that all cortices are cerebral. I'm not sure why he thinks "parlance" is an example, since it is reasonably common by itself. Nothing's special about "Maginot"; it's just a noun adjunct referring to the French politician.
Feb
19
comment What do you call two words that contradict each other in a sentence?
I think there might be a more specific rhetorical term for using an oxymoron in this way, but I couldn't find it.
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Jul
31
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
6
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
2
comment Pronunciation of “'ll”
@BarrieEngland: You mean "Phonemically".
Jun
2
comment Patterns for words with “iev” and “eiv”
And also "Kiev".
May
11
comment What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?
@JeffLockhart: It'll have to be "sounds natural"—if you try to make any hard rule in these fluid aspects of English grammar, you'll get educated speakers breaking it frequently.
May
6
comment Is there a word that means “over-enunciate the k sound”?
Another possibility is glottalization; I tend to glottalize word-final voiceless plosives ([ˈwiʔkʰ]).
Apr
7
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
11
awarded  Necromancer
Feb
14
revised What does this use of “carpeted” mean?
edited tags
Feb
10
revised Advocate versus Partisan
edited tags
Feb
10
comment Advocate versus Partisan
There is a difference between supporting a cause and a faction: the former means loyalty to to the cause, the latter to the organization, which doesn't necessarily solely serve the cause. I like "advocate ~ spokesman".
Feb
7
revised Which is correct: “If it were I” or “If it were me”?
added 57 characters in body
Feb
7
comment Is this a run-on sentence?
It's not strictly a run-on, but it's poorly written and has too many commas.