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seen Aug 29 at 8:57

Aug
29
suggested suggested edit on Superlative and definite article “the”
Jun
27
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
@F.E. - That's a really useful list. The only thing I'm concerned about now is getting into more detail and seeing tense changes work against that list.
Jun
27
comment Sentences beginning with “so”?
That said, it seems appropriate usage would be in replacement of "for example", not "because of that".
Jun
27
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
@F.E. That's interesting. I think I need to do more reading about complements to fully understand what you mean, seeing specific examples of complements in various locations.
Jun
27
revised Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
added 680 characters in body
Jun
27
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
@FumbleFingers I'm not looking for a term for uses, but rather a term for items that follow and are connected to the be verb. Perhaps there is none, but I think it's useful in the same way other items of this kind are useful: it helps people to begin to form patterns in their mind to recognize trends more naturally. There's really only a short, limited set of patterns that directly follow and connect to the be verb.
Jun
26
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
@FumbleFingers My confusion here is that a "clause" must have a subject and a verb, right? So, it would not include nouns, noun phrases, verb phrases without subjects, or adjectives--not to mention many combinations of these and adverb-containing versions of all of these. So, I intentionally avoided use of the word 'clause' in the initial question. What I'm trying to find is the ~proper~ term for the portion of the sentence which directly 'follows' and 'participates with' the be verb.
Jun
25
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
@FumbleFingers Still, of course, I followed your recommendations to the best of my ability (see update).
Jun
25
revised Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
added 453 characters in body; edited tags
Jun
25
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
@FumbleFingers The question requests definitions, so you may as well ask me to answer my own question. It's kind of silly because I wouldn't be asking if I knew the answer.
Jun
25
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
@PeterShor But the predicate participates with the verb, so they're generally grouped together (i.e., 'to be going fishing not' 'to fishing').
Jun
24
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
For example, maybe 'predicative expression'?
Jun
24
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
What I'm looking at is, for example, "I am..." And it is followed by: adjective, auxiliary, p.t. verb, gerund, article + noun, preposition + place/activity, or adverb + any of these.... So, I was hoping for a hyponym, essentially.
Jun
24
revised Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
added 94 characters in body
Jun
23
asked Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
Jun
14
comment Are there any English sayings equivalent to the Japanese proverb, “Go to bed early and wait for the good news”?
Similar: I can't look back because my bags are packed.
May
3
revised Reading actions back so as to intentionally make them appear fundamentally evil?
added 469 characters in body
May
3
comment Reading actions back so as to intentionally make them appear fundamentally evil?
Yeah. Take all that, clump it together into one word, and what do you get? Basically, 'doing anything possible to create a negative relationship and interpret things poorly'....
May
2
comment Reading actions back so as to intentionally make them appear fundamentally evil?
I've heard this mentioned in media, popular fiction, and journalism, so many times over. I think it would be very useful to have an easy-to-remember term that everyone could easily agree upon.
May
2
revised Reading actions back so as to intentionally make them appear fundamentally evil?
Constricting the scope and included more descriptive language.