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Mar
1
suggested rejected edit on What animal is a “weefil”?
Mar
1
suggested rejected edit on What animal is a “weefil”?
Mar
1
awarded  Excavator
Mar
1
revised What animal is a “weefil”?
`file:///...bat/dimmer.bat -reading-mode-monitor` pull request. Good time! `Got pipe for camping!! [#dreamincode]`
Mar
1
suggested approved edit on What animal is a “weefil”?
Mar
1
comment What is the rule for adjective order?
Doesn't the brain work by inquiry. pull request
Mar
1
comment Is there any word in English where “th” sounds like “t+h”?
Yeah. All of them. It's a temporal illusion to say "th". You allide the pronunciation of the consonants. That's why they sound so good to you--it's because of the principal of the thing.
Jun
10
comment Possessive and plural of “Series”
I thought you put the apostrophe after words ending in s, like plural cases. Then you pronounce two 'es' sound when speaking them. The sheeps' wool = "the sheepses wool" = more than one sheep's wool. Another example: "my parent's" vs "my parents'". It removes the ambiguity. I would opt for sheep's in "these sheep's" for simplicity in reading and pronunciation, but certainly if I thought there would be ambiguity (i.e., "my sheep" or "the sheep"), I would opt for sheeps' to distill that. Of course, that's stylistic.
May
13
comment “number of students rises up slightly” – is this correct?
Yeah, I think the same applies to 'steady'. You're fighting that classic conflict: "sounds nice" vs "redundant". Concision is desired in an educational setting, but I like to read things until they sound smooth, bud. You just have to figure out your audience in these situations because you're correct regardless of whether or not you include the prepositions. If you want to really go concise, you don't need 'slightly', either.
May
9
awarded  Taxonomist
Mar
4
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
15
comment Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
This answer might be improved if definitions were added. Especially for 'semalfactive', which isn't a common word.
Nov
15
comment Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
@LightMikeE What I was thinking was: state A cannot be compared to state B because, even if it seems the same, time has is different. Again, I would really like to know more about the etymology of this term. Is it to do with feinting? Because a feint is basically two actions that are not comparable by design.
Nov
15
answered “to not get” vs “not to get”
Nov
15
accepted Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
Nov
15
comment Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
I would classify so many of these differently, though. I'd say popping a balloon isn't an achievement at all. frown. I'd say believing is quite the accomplishment. pink tear. And while I agree that clapping, knocking, and flashing are all semifalic, I also think they're all activities. This is a very fun topic. Thank you for your answer.
Nov
15
comment Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
@LightMikeE You probably prefer 'fientive' because it embodies durative verbs as well as dynamic verbs. I don't know everything about the etymology (though I'd love to know more), but I understand it to mean: [something(s)] cannot be compared. I'm assuming that something is the state (e.g., antonym:stative).
Nov
15
comment Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
So what's a hyponym? Fience? Stativeness? Lexical aspect?
Nov
15
comment Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
Perhaps this is what I'm searching for: grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/progressive.htm
Nov
15
comment Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?
@JoAnne Having the same problem. I'm trying to brainstorm words that might lead a trace, like 'effability'. I honestly do believe that it is something to do with whether or not a verb can be easily acted out: some technical term I want to shine light on in a TESOL presentation.