533 reputation
313
bio website thingsthatgobleep.com
location New Zealand
age 33
visits member for 3 years
seen Oct 15 at 2:17

I am a gamer, programmer, and a wannabe linguist who is fluent in English and Mandarin, and proficient in French.

I am an achievement hunter. Come and visit me on trueachievements.com

I am also an administrator on Wiktionary and have been for over 3 years. I edit mostly in French, Dutch, English and Mandarin, but I also dabble in Italian, Japanese, Maori and Swedish. We are constantly looking for competent volunteers/lexicographers to contribute to this wonderful multilingual dictionary website.

profile for James Jiao on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


May
10
comment 'I don't like fish.' 'Me, too.' Is this natural?
So what you are suggesting is that people 'shouldn't' use it? What about 'Me too'? Shouldn't use it either? Besides the OP is looking for a more 'natural' way of expressing the topic. To me, it means idiomatic, not grammatical. Not every idiomatic English phrase is grammatical, just so you know.
May
10
comment Is “solutioning” a correct word?
What does it even mean??
May
9
comment Is “haphazard” a unique word?
Probably because the 'p' is part of the first syllable and 'h' part of the second syllable??
May
9
comment Meaning of 'swung around' in this context
To swing by is probably more common among the folks in in AusNZ. Also, the use of with sounds a little awkward to me...
May
7
comment Common synonym of tortuosity or antonym of straightness
The example has a very awkward construction, at least to me...
May
7
comment Meaning of 'an old hat'
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/old_hat
May
4
comment Use Schedule and Timetable together
Also note the pronunciation of the word schedule in the two flavours of English.
May
4
comment Is it correct to say “12:00am”?
That's why I am sticking with my 24hour notation!
May
3
comment Which is correct: “successor to” or “successor of”?
That being said, it seems that metonymic concepts such as the Throne or the Chair are idiomatically preceded by successor to, not successor of. Though I could be wrong.
May
2
comment Which is correct: “successor to” or “successor of”?
Both are 'correct' as both are used.
May
1
comment What does 'later this month' mean?
Exactly, that sounds sarcastic, but granted with a tint of dry humour. But literally? Could be, but how likely? As I said, it's up to the context. I'd say this sarcastically to someone any day!
Apr
20
comment A term or phrase expressing the cheapening of a quality by measuring it in monetary terms
I did consider this option before posting the question, but it doesn't really feel pejorative. Of course, it can be pejorative given a pejorative context, but it's pretty neutral on its own. However this is definitely a valid option, if the translation is done properly.
Apr
13
comment What is the plural of “ostrich”?
Just wondering.... Is there any reason why you prefer googling over referencing a dictionary?
Feb
10
comment “I have got a Playstation” versus “I have got Playstation”
@Flimzy What 'form' are you talking about? A little subjective here on your part. I grew up using both forms. I consider the 'have got' form to be slightly informal and it's usually not used in its past tense form 'had got'. That's it. There is nothing good or bad about it. Just idiomatic.
Dec
22
comment Word for first sale of the day
'I am sure it would be the same in other countries as well.'.. This is quite a big assumption. It's like saying 'I am sure shaking of the head is a gesture of denying/declining in other countries as well.', when most of us here know this is not the case. I am not aware of such a term in English. This is a lacuna that can only be filled by borrowing from another language if the situation ever arises to express such a notion.
Dec
2
comment Difference between “banner” and “flag”
Or like in la Marseillaise - ... L'étendard sanglant est levé... (the bloody flag is raised)...
Nov
28
comment What does it mean “It is hard to get by just upon a smile”?
That's exactly what this line means. It presumably is a song from a parent to his/her daughter. Kids are usually fairly naive when they step into the society for the first time. This whole song is essentially there to give them a heads-up.
Nov
28
comment What do British and American post boxes say when they don't want any advertising?
NZ/Aus use similar phrasing. No circulars/No junk mail are probably more common.
Nov
25
comment Passive of “tried to eat”
Does sound like that doesn't it? :).
Nov
25
comment Should I greet my customer at 6pm with “good evening” or “good afternoon”?
+1 to this answer. That's what I would do. If it's still light, then Good afternoon, if dark, then good evening. There really isn't a cut-off time for saying them.