510 reputation
212
bio website thingsthatgobleep.com
location New Zealand
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Jul 28 at 20:48

I am a gamer, programmer, and a wannabe linguist who is fluent in English and Mandarin, and proficient in French.

I am an achievement hunter. Come and visit me on trueachievements.com

I am also an administrator on Wiktionary and have been for over 3 years. I edit mostly in French, Dutch, English and Mandarin, but I also dabble in Italian, Japanese, Maori and Swedish. We are constantly looking for competent volunteers/lexicographers to contribute to this wonderful multilingual dictionary website.

profile for James Jiao on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


May
28
comment The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis
@tchrist Again, how are my points contradicting with yours? Which part of "I should've gone on to add that it's a fine alternative where I live." did you not understand?
May
28
comment The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis
@J.R. I am aware of that. I should've gone on to add that it's a fine alternative where I live.
May
28
comment The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis
To the OP, this question is likely to be closed as you didn't specify what sort of problem you are having with this. It feels to me that you simply want others to do the work for you. Tell us how you interpret each choice and what you think is correct, then this question might have some merit.
May
28
comment The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis
@Jim Hiring is a perfectly fine alternative to renting. You can hire a car; you can also hire a TV. You can buy things on hire purchase.
May
25
comment English words mockingly derived from French?
Yes, really. I am not kidding. It's a very interesting topic. I'd do it if I have the patience to get to the academic point of writing one!
May
25
comment Why do websites have Caucasian as a race?
let us continue this discussion in chat
May
25
comment Why do websites have Caucasian as a race?
@tchrist To me, ethnicity is simply about your ancestry. On the census form, I always note myself down as 'Chinese', because it is my ancestry. If you want to talk about culture, I am nowhere near how someone would describe a typical 'Chinese'. Then again what is a typical Chinese?
May
25
comment Why do websites have Caucasian as a race?
@tchrist When did I say it's about who you hang out with? And please, calm down, read my post again. Tell me exactly which part of my post you interpret as "it's about who you hung out with"?
May
25
comment Why do websites have Caucasian as a race?
@tchrist How does my point contradict yours? I am confused
May
25
comment English words mockingly derived from French?
This would be a good research subject for a Master's thesis I believe.
May
25
comment “Indian-born Chinese” vs. “Chinese-born Indian”
Pedantic but brilliant answer.
May
25
comment Why do websites have Caucasian as a race?
It's not an explicitly racist term, so at the end of day, it all comes down to interpretation. I don't find it racist at all. It's just a term used to categorize ethnicity. That's all it is to me.
May
24
comment Indirect, quoted speech: He's all
I am all.... is short for I am all like..., I believe.
May
23
comment Why do we pronounce Dean as /diːn/ but Sean as /ʃɒn/?
We pronounce it as /ʃɔ:n/ here, but your point still stands.
May
21
comment Is using “needing” correct?
You are talking about an English gerund, which in the case is synonymous with and replaces the relative clause that modifies the man. You should probably read up a grammar book on that.
May
21
comment “Barrier will open” vs. “barrier will be opened”
+1 for mentioning of ergative verbs.
May
15
comment Biden Got Out ‘Over His Skis,’ Says Obama
I've never heard of this expression, but from its literal meaning, I surmise that when you are in a hurry, you tend to fall over your skis, so by extension, it would mean getting ahead of yourself too soon, or too hasty as you guessed.
May
14
comment Origin of the word “elder”
Which sense? Elder as in the tree or elder as in a person?
May
14
comment What's the origin and reasoning behind the phrase, “a pat on the back”?
Patting people on the back is not a congratulatory gesture found only in English-speaking countries. Many Asian countries have the same gesture and the same associated meaning. So it's not hard to extend the meaning of the physical gesture to its figurative sense, i.e., to congratulate an individual.
May
10
comment When the plural ends in “-ies”, how do I know whether the singular ends in “-y” or “-ie”?
I understand your quandary, but asking for a list is probably going to get your question closed...