545 reputation
314
bio website thingsthatgobleep.com
location New Zealand
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Nov 10 at 21:31

I am a gamer, programmer, and a wannabe linguist who is fluent in English and Mandarin, and proficient in French.

I am an achievement hunter. Come and visit me on trueachievements.com

I am also an administrator on Wiktionary and have been for over 3 years. I edit mostly in French, Dutch, English and Mandarin, but I also dabble in Italian, Japanese, Maori and Swedish. We are constantly looking for competent volunteers/lexicographers to contribute to this wonderful multilingual dictionary website.

profile for James Jiao on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


May
10
answered 'I don't like fish.' 'Me, too.' Is this natural?
May
10
asked A word that describes getting your product 'represented' at a retailer
May
9
comment Is “haphazard” a unique word?
Probably because the 'p' is part of the first syllable and 'h' part of the second syllable??
May
9
comment Meaning of 'swung around' in this context
To swing by is probably more common among the folks in in AusNZ. Also, the use of with sounds a little awkward to me...
May
7
comment Common synonym of tortuosity or antonym of straightness
The example has a very awkward construction, at least to me...
May
7
comment Meaning of 'an old hat'
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/old_hat
May
4
comment Use Schedule and Timetable together
Also note the pronunciation of the word schedule in the two flavours of English.
May
4
comment Is it correct to say “12:00am”?
That's why I am sticking with my 24hour notation!
May
4
answered What does “kept an ear out on the street” mean?
May
4
revised What does “kept an ear out on the street” mean?
Blockquoted the story. It took me a few seconds to figure out where the question was.
May
4
suggested suggested edit on What does “kept an ear out on the street” mean?
May
3
comment Which is correct: “successor to” or “successor of”?
That being said, it seems that metonymic concepts such as the Throne or the Chair are idiomatically preceded by successor to, not successor of. Though I could be wrong.
May
2
comment Which is correct: “successor to” or “successor of”?
Both are 'correct' as both are used.
May
1
awarded  Editor
May
1
revised What does 'later this month' mean?
added 770 characters in body
May
1
comment What does 'later this month' mean?
Exactly, that sounds sarcastic, but granted with a tint of dry humour. But literally? Could be, but how likely? As I said, it's up to the context. I'd say this sarcastically to someone any day!
May
1
answered What does 'later this month' mean?
Apr
30
answered What's the meaning of 'squared away' here?
Apr
22
accepted A term or phrase expressing the cheapening of a quality by measuring it in monetary terms
Apr
20
comment A term or phrase expressing the cheapening of a quality by measuring it in monetary terms
I did consider this option before posting the question, but it doesn't really feel pejorative. Of course, it can be pejorative given a pejorative context, but it's pretty neutral on its own. However this is definitely a valid option, if the translation is done properly.