265 reputation
15
bio website
location San Antonio, TX
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jul 28 at 18:40

Sep
19
awarded  Yearling
Mar
19
comment “Whereäs” as an alternative spelling of “whereas”
@JasonO I am glad that is a joke spelling. (However, I don't know if Wiktionary should take newsgroup postings as material for the lexicon.) Yet Latin has the word prætensis.
Jan
26
awarded  Commentator
Jan
26
comment “Whereäs” as an alternative spelling of “whereas”
@PLL I wonder, why did the readers feel it needed to be that way?
Nov
28
revised What is the difference between “ostensibly” and “probably”?
added 6 characters in body
Nov
28
comment What is the difference between “ostensibly” and “probably”?
@Bruno Oh, my, what was I thinking?!
Nov
27
comment What does *countenance* mean, and why do I have hard time remembering it?
@ScottM Ah, I didn't know of that line before.
Nov
27
comment What word is complimentary, but sounds like “chunky”?
I had forgotten that one, although it is not "old-fashioned" to me.
Nov
27
awarded  Editor
Nov
27
revised What does *countenance* mean, and why do I have hard time remembering it?
deleted 339 characters in body
Nov
26
comment What word is complimentary, but sounds like “chunky”?
@MMyers Did you consider whether it is derogatory or not?
Nov
26
comment “Whereäs” as an alternative spelling of “whereas”
@Rahul That is so pretentious it is silly.
Nov
26
answered What is the difference between “ostensibly” and “probably”?
Nov
26
awarded  Critic
Nov
26
comment What is the difference between “ostensibly” and “probably”?
Apparently is an even closer one.
Nov
26
answered What does *countenance* mean, and why do I have hard time remembering it?
Nov
24
comment How do I pluralize “horsepower?”
Both of those examples somewhat abuse the term, in that they use a word with a precise definition when they should say "power outputs" or "power ratings". Since "horsepower" is a technical term, and both of those magazines are not technical, this is simply a misuse of the term. Bluntly, the phrase "some limited contexts" is "weasel words" and avoids directly saying that the writers simply misapply a technical term. This can happen in natural language to the point where it becomes accepted speech, so I realize the smallness of legality. After all, we understand what the writer is saying.
Nov
24
awarded  Teacher
Nov
24
comment How many spaces should come after a period/full stop?
Yes, I believe the user of two spaces on typewriters was for readability.
Nov
24
awarded  Supporter