552 reputation
28
bio website lucaswilkins.com
location England, United Kingdom
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen May 12 at 16:21

Jul
4
comment What does “chemical Mickey” that drives a man to love-making mean?
It is a very strange thing to say, as all Mickeys are chemical, not in the sense of "everything made of chemicals", but in the stronger sense of synthetic and artificial (and, moreover, biological signals are not).
Jul
1
comment Is it OK to use “empty-handed” on an animal?
@TrevorD I'm a little surprised at that. It's one of those words like "hung" that get used all the time, even if they are wrong in some sense. (thanks for letting me know: gravatar auto-fill)
Jun
28
comment Is it OK to use “empty-handed” on an animal?
@TrevorD I think many people would say "dove in", which makes it much easier to parse.
Jun
25
comment Is there English counterpart(s) to Japanese old saying, “Present salt to your enemy.”?
@Mitch There is the less mean spirited "all's fair in love and war".
Jun
17
revised Morally speaking, 1+1=2
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Jun
17
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
@user867 maybe.
Jun
17
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
@user867 I think the intention of this answer was to point out that I was being a little presumptive in the way I originally phrased the question (it hasn't changed except for where marked), J.R. was right about that even if I otherwise disagree with him. Although he didn't really answer the question, it was a constructive thing to add. I hope you will reconsider.
Jun
17
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
I cut a few too many words there.
Jun
17
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
I like Mitch's characterisation above: "metaphorical and provocative". The difference between these and the case in hand is that everyone would agree or know of their meaning, but you must have a particular attitude to intuitively see a similarity between moral and some types of mathematical reasoning. As for it implying a particular valuation, I agree with you about it not being necessary. For now I can only think of neutral and negative implications, so to be convinced it is not a stretch I really need evidence against the negative interpreations, rather than an absence of evidence for them.
Jun
16
revised Morally speaking, 1+1=2
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Jun
16
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
I guess the reason I think there is a little more substance to it is that one is generally less inclined to be lighthearted about things one takes seriously - a priest may be disinclined to use the word "sin" in the 2a sense as it could suggest the matters of sin should be treated lightly. Another example, though quite an extreme one in comparison, is that of casual racism. If one wishes to be treated seriously as non-racist, it is better to avoid making lighthearted but racist jokes. Being lighthearted seems to me to indicate that one is not otherwise invested in it as a serious matter.
Jun
16
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
Please see my edit. Personally, if someone says "It would be a sin..." I think it says something about them and the community they live in. Moreover, I think it says something about what they think "sin" is. There is something shared between "sinning" and "using sugar in apple pie". My question is what is shared between "moral thinking" and "mathematical handwaving", there are different meanings depending on what is shared.
Jun
16
revised Morally speaking, 1+1=2
added 552 characters in body
Jun
16
revised Morally speaking, 1+1=2
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Jun
16
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
@MετάEd ... so how do I downvote a comment? ;)
Jun
16
answered A word that means “to become one's name”
Jun
16
asked Morally speaking, 1+1=2
Jun
14
comment What does Theoden's quote in The Two Towers 'oft evil will shall evil mar' mean?
This is a garden path sentence: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_path_sentence
Jun
12
awarded  Critic
Jun
8
comment Similar numbers
Yes, "A is almost B" would imply "A is almost equal to B", and it is not usually considered wrong to say either. However, there are some who do think it is actually incorrect, though I'm not one of them. But still, saying "A is (almost) equal to B" is like saying "A is more than at least B".