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Mar
5
comment Two imperative clauses joined by coordinating conjunction taken as a conditional
I agree with the two previous comments. The problem I see here is that getting hurt is not something one chooses to do (or not), it simply happens. Therefore, the imperitive, "nobody get hurt!" seems very odd and it therefore takes some time to parse. With the other example, "nobody move and nobody shoot anyone", I understand this as two seperate instructions, as people more or less have the ability to control whether or not they move or shoot people (within reason).
Jan
14
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
17
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
1
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
20
awarded  Yearling
Aug
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
29
comment Meaning of W in SFPW, or a synonym that starts with a W
@Andrew - That did occur to me, too. I think your explanation is most likely, though.
Aug
29
answered Meaning of W in SFPW, or a synonym that starts with a W
Jul
24
accepted Can we say that X is “indifferent between” two possible courses of action?
Jul
24
comment Can we say that X is “indifferent between” two possible courses of action?
Brilliant, I really was blocked on that - I think I just had the word "indifferent" in my head and couldn't see how to fornmulate a sentence without it. Many thanks!
Jul
24
revised Can we say that X is “indifferent between” two possible courses of action?
Added example
Jul
24
asked Can we say that X is “indifferent between” two possible courses of action?
Jul
10
answered Specific vocabulary for making someone laugh by rubbing their underarm with finger
Jul
10
comment “If you were to …” or “If you …” or “If you will …”
While I would agree that the third example given in the question is incorrect, I would add that it is possible to mix conditionals, especially III and II (usually in that order) to express the current consequence of a past (in)action. For example, "If I hadn't given up learning the piano years ago, I would be interested in buying yours.". And, to take the example given by alexlo, "If you had gone home [before the second bottle of tequila was opened], you would feel better [now]."
Jun
21
answered Why do people say “Why don’t you not?”
Jun
20
comment Are there any words in English meaning “goodbye forever”?
Reminds me of the end of the Pete and Dud sketch: "Goodbye Sah! – Or is it au revoir?" "No, Perkins."
Jun
14
answered Antonym for “challenge” (noun form)
May
23
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
28
comment “Italy-based company” or “Italian-based company”
And not necessarily having an Italian history at all. I tend to agree with you. My preference is for companies -- be they Swiss, American or Martian -- that have their offices or main operations in Italy, to be called Italy-based. It's hard to think of a good example with companies, but for other things it may be possible to use "Italian-based" to describe things that follow the traits or customs associated with Italy, e.g. "The team operates an Italian-based catenaccio defensive system" a bit of a clumsy example, perhaps, but that's my point I suppose.
Mar
27
comment “Italy-based company” or “Italian-based company”
...or culture, cuisine, customs etc. - I'm glad we agree. It's interesting that there's very little consistency among "serious" newspapers regarding this - from a brief search of a few titles, it seems to be around 50:50.