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I like my English like I like my sex -- casual, yet meaningful.


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Dec
1
comment Is “teen-ager” correct? Still used? Etymology?
The unhyphenated version is by far more common in written US English today, as well. I think the New York Times example is indicative of a copyediting quirk more than anything.
Nov
29
comment facial expression of sympathetic pain?
I do not think flinch and wince are synonyms, but I do think wince is the word OP is looking for.
Nov
22
comment Do people still speak old English in South Africa?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is not about English.
Nov
22
comment What's the neutral measurement unit for masculine and feminine?
@RegDwigнt There are definitely more than two points. Here's a series of images that underscores how many "points" there can be for a single individual, let alone humanity at large: i.huffpost.com/gen/1468820/original.jpg
Nov
22
comment What's the neutral measurement unit for masculine and feminine?
Unlike fixed quantities such as height and weight, gender presentation (which seems to be what you're asking about) is quite often fluid and, in any case, not possible to "measure" in the same way.
Nov
17
comment Definite article usage: “I'm going to mosque” Or “I'm going to the mosque”?
@EdwinAshworth Justified or not, if someone told me, "I teach children math school," I'd think, "Good thing you're not teaching them English [school]."
Nov
17
comment Definite article usage: “I'm going to mosque” Or “I'm going to the mosque”?
Good answer. To further complicate things, there are variations on either side of the Atlantic; Americans don't "go to hospital," for instance, whatever the reason for their visit.
Nov
14
comment A comical/informal synonym for “big”/“large” but not inappropriate
You might say whopping. It sounds a bit quaint/old-fashioned to my ears, and might have a funny(ish) effect because of that. Definitely family-friendly.
Nov
12
comment What word describes the process of conceptualizing a collection of things by giving it a name?
Asking the community to come up with the specific word you've forgotten while dismissing every other potential candidates is a bit frustrating. I understand you're in search of that special forgotten word, but the phenomenon you're describing isn't all that complicated. "When a word for something is created or discovered," that something is named, or perhaps classified. There are plenty of synonyms for those two verbs, and some time spent with a thesaurus will hopefully lead you to the one you're looking for.
Nov
5
comment What does “ hand-me-downs of talk” mean ?
@TimLymington I do think they are opposed, yes; trite connotes lacking import/significance (and I am saying they can be significant), while vacuous connotes lacking meaning (and I am saying they can be meaningful).
Nov
5
comment What does “ hand-me-downs of talk” mean ?
I don't think the implication need be phrases that are trite or vacuous; "hand-me-downs of talk" can also be full of meaning and cultural significance.