21,792 reputation
12052
bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 14 hours ago

Feb
24
comment “Belated happy birthday” or “happy belated birthday”?
Those saying that a birthday can't be belated must not know any women over about 25. Women very often delay celebrating their 30th birthday until they're about 40. :)
Feb
14
comment Is “solutioning” a correct word?
@RegDwigнt I did not mean that this is a bad idea because I personally hate it, but rather that I personally hate it because it is a bad idea. Surely whenever someone says "please don't do this", the understanding is that we are encouraging the person not to do it because it is bad, not that somehow our use of the word "please" is some sort of reason why it is bad.
Feb
10
comment Is “Far East” politically incorrect?
BTW I haven't done a study of this, but I think most world maps made in the United States put the Western Hemisphere on the left and the Eastern Hemisphere on the right, breaking about the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Second most popular is to put the Western Hemisphere in the middle and break the Eastern Hemisphere into two pieces, some on the left and some on the right, with a break through central Asia somewhere. Like the map shown above.
Feb
7
comment How do I properly use [sic] for a phrase? Or do I use it at all?
@Murphy I believe both "comparison with" and "comparison to" are routinely used. Google ngrams shows "with" as more popular but plenty of "to"s out there. books.google.com/ngrams/… Both seem equally semantically valid to me.
Jan
23
comment “Cancelled” or “Canceled”?
When I was a kid in (American) school, I was taught that if the final vowel is short, double the consonant before adding -ed or -ing. This rule made sense to me as the resulting word then followed the usual rules for determining if the vowel is long or short. To my eyes, "canceled" should be pronounced "kan-seeld". This is the rule I followed until Microsoft spell-check came along and told me it was wrong. I see from Google ngrams that "cancelled" was more popular than "canceled" until circa 1985, so I wonder if Microsoft spell-check is, in fact, dictating the future course of the language!
Jan
21
comment American vs. British English: meaning of “One hundred and fifty”
Sometimes. That's what I mean by my second sentence. Sometimes it's read "one hundred and fifty", other times "one hundred fifty". I was taught that the "correct" way is without the "and", but if that's the rule, it is widely ignored.
Jan
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
13
comment When is it appropriate to use the title “Miss” as opposed to “Ms.”?
I'm not sure what you mean by "the proper way". We've had discussions here before about what most people actually say in practice versus rules somebody wrote in a book 100 years ago. In the US, anyway, most married women refer to themselves as "Mrs. Mary Smith". "Mrs. Fred Smith" is not unheard of but very, very rare. A couple together may be referred to as "Mr. & Mrs. Fred Smith", I don't think that's too uncommon, especially on invitations to a formal event.
Jan
7
comment Austin Powers: “Oh Behave” - what does it mean?
As an American, I often get a laugh out of how Americans are portrayed in British TV and movies -- exaggerated stereotypes of being greedy and arrogant and always walking and talking very fast. Sometimes I notice obvious stereotypes of other nationalities in American movies, other times I probably miss them because, that's how all British/Germans/Japanese/whatever are, isn't it?
Jan
7
answered What does “the height of inhumanity” mean in the context?
Jan
2
comment Is there a word for beings that will eat other Sentient beings?
Every meat that is not commonly eaten by Americans is described as "tasting like chicken".
Jan
2
comment Is there a word for beings that will eat other Sentient beings?
... long before cells were discovered.
Jan
2
comment Is there a word for beings that will eat other Sentient beings?
Could get very philosophical here. As we have only one example of a generally-recognized intelligent life form available for study -- humans -- it's very difficult to draw generalizations. I think in real life we first define a category based on vague feelings that "A and B go together but C is different" and then search for a way to define it technically, rather than the other way around. For example, biologists have definitions of "plant kingdom" versus "animal kingdom" based on technical considerations like the presence of a cell wall, but people used the words "plant" and "animal" ...
Jan
2
comment Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?
"Air-permeable" would mean specifically that air can pass through, as opposed to "water-permeable" or more generally "liquid-permeable". But in any case, this is a technical term, suitable for technical contexts but likely to be inappropriate for casual conversation. A biologist might say, "A semi-permeable membrane surrounds the cell's cytoplasm", but a handyman is very unlikely to say, "The screen door is air-permeable."
Dec
20
comment Correct pronunciation of “TT”?
soft = unvoiced, i.e. said without using your vocal cords; hard = voiced, with vocal cords. "t" and "d" are hard and soft versions of the same sound. Similarly p/b, f/v, ch/j, s/z, and k/g. See, for example, slb-ltsu.hull.ac.uk/awe/index.php?title=Hard_%28consonant%29
Dec
20
comment Come on, don’t be such a nimrod!
Not to get into a deep discussion of epistemology, but every assertion one makes is at best "probably true", with varying degrees of certain. I can't say with 100% certainty that tchrist exists: maybe it's just a fake name created by another user on here to hide his excessive number of posts. I can't say with 100% certainly that France exists: I've never been there, nor have I ever met anyone who claims to have been there. Maybe it's a fictional place invented by the British to frighten small children. Etc.
Dec
20
comment What does the suffix “-saurus” mean?
"Thank you for using your brain." I don't know, sounds dangerous. Too many people using their brains, the next thing you know, they start questioning the Established Order. :-)
Dec
20
comment What does the suffix “-saurus” mean?
@Urbycoz Now I have all these mental pictures of the "Tyranno-thesaurus" chomping on words! If I ever teach kids of the appropriate age again, I'll have to make up some appropriate illustrations!
Dec
20
comment Is there a word for beings that will eat other Sentient beings?
As Shakespeare wrote, worms are clearly the highest form of life on Earth, or at least the top of the food chain. "Worms are the emperor of all diets. We fatten up all creatures to feed ourselves, and we fatten ourselves for the worms to eat when we’re dead." Hamlet, Act 4, Scene 3.
Dec
20
answered Is “fine” one of the strangest words in English language? How did it come to be this way and are there other examples?