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Sep
5
comment Is the construction “maker of all universe” grammatical in any English dialect?
@kris I did an ngram search and went through some of these references. Most of these are not really the phrase "all universe" but there's some other punctuation in there, like "it is part of the all, universe". A couple had "stars in the (something something parenthesis ALL) universe". A few mentioned an "All-Universe Competition". There were several that had numerous grammar problems of which "all universe" was just one. There do appear to be some Indian metaphysical books that talk about "all universe", so perhaps this is an accepted usage in Indian English.
Sep
5
comment Is the construction “maker of all universe” grammatical in any English dialect?
Not related to the original question, but this brings up the thought: If your child asks why he should study grammar, one answer is: So you can recognize spam emails. If you get an email that claims to be from a big company or the government, and it contains multiple grammar errors, it is almost surely fake. Every now and then a big organization will send out an email that has a grammar error, but very rarely more than one.
Sep
5
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
@grimxn Yeah, that's my point. At least for the Scottish question, we have a general word: "British". For the Netherlands, to the best of my knowledge, we don't, and so we use Dutch for all of them. BTW reminds me of a World War 2 movie I saw years ago, where a representative from the military is sent to tell a family that their son has been killed in action. He tries to console them by saying, "He died fighting for England." And the father replies harshly, "He was Scottish." Leaving the army guy stammering.
Sep
5
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
@grimxn Yes, I've heard that too, didn't go into it as it was a side note on the main subject. I think 99.9% of Americans would call anyone from the Netherlands "Dutch", and to the best of my knowledge we have no more general term. Happy to hear if anyone has more information on this.
Sep
5
answered Is the construction “maker of all universe” grammatical in any English dialect?
Sep
4
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
Americans, at least, routinely say that someone is "a German" or "a Canadian". We most definitely do not say "a French", but rather "a French person" or "from France". Maybe usage in other English-speaking countries is different.
Sep
4
answered Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
Sep
4
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
I thought the word for someone from Britain was "Limey" ...
Sep
2
comment Word/phrase for taking the pilot out of the equation in turning a piloted aircraft into a UAV
An "automated" process or machine may or may not have human supervision. In practice, I think outside of science fiction any machine has SOME level of human supervision, some person who programs it or sets its controls in some way. If there is very little human control, people call it "a fully autonomous automated process", as opposed to a "semi-autonomous automated process". If it was "non-autonomous" I think that would mean it isn't automated at all, so it's not a very meaningful term.
Sep
2
comment Word that refers to both input and output devices
@Lumberjack's answer -- "I/O devices" -- is the commonly-used term. I don't think there'd be anything to gain by finding a more obscure term or making up a new one.
Sep
2
comment A word to describe someone or something that is not last?
I'm not aware of a single word that expresses this idea. I'd just say "all but the last" or similar.
Sep
2
comment What is a synonym for “girlfriend”?
@MartinMcCallion I did say "and couples living together". I was referring to heterosexual couples there. Sorry if that wasn't clear.
Sep
2
comment What is a synonym for “girlfriend”?
@MartinMcCallion UK usage may be different, and for something like this there might be sub-cultures here in the U.S. that would use the word differently. But I don't recall ever hearing a man refer to a woman whom he was dating, i.e. not living with, as his "partner". I can't insist that it might not be used that way in social or cultural circles different from my own, but I don't recall ever hearing such usage.
Aug
29
answered Why We Need To Know About Hyperboles
Aug
29
comment Couldn't be parked: Ngaio Marsh
My first thought on reading the question was, like others, "I am not willing to make a commitment." But from the following lines, she seems to be accepting his proposal. I mean, someone might turn down a proposal and then say, "I do love you", in the sense of "but not that way" or "but other considerations prevent me from being willing to marry you". But if that was the intent, why would she go along with him "taking her in his arms". Perhaps the intended meaning was "I wasn't able to make a decision before now."
Jul
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
24
answered Deriving a word for the activity of using a tool from the tool name (“grep”)
Jul
24
comment Deriving a word for the activity of using a tool from the tool name (“grep”)
When you put it that way, grep always makes me weep, so maybe that would be more appropriate.
Jul
24
comment How to say “She/He is my girlfriend/boyfriend” without the possessive “my”
@me_and "Your interpretation of a relationship ... may have been embedded in the concept of a relationship itself several decades ago, but SADLY the world has moved on since then." There, fixed that for you. A world where a husband and wife view each other possessively is much more fun.
Jul
24
comment How to say “She/He is my girlfriend/boyfriend” without the possessive “my”
Non-standard, and especially overly intimate or sentimental descriptions like these, could be inappropriate in many contexts. Like if she accompanies you to the bank when you apply for a loan and the bank officer says, "And who is this?", it would be distinctly weird to say, "Oh, she is my reason for being, the reason why I want to wake up in the morning. She is the light of my life." Like hey, they just want to know if she's going to co-sign the note. They don't want to hear a poetry recital.