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Mar
17
comment How do you native speakers pronounce @ in an email address?
As in, "4 @ $2" means you are buying or selling 4 for $2 each, total price = $8.
Mar
17
comment How do you native speakers pronounce @ in an email address?
I've always head it called either "the 'at' sign" or "commercial 'at'", since long before email was common. (I'm an old man.) I never heard the term "asperand" before reading the above post. That certainly doesn't prove it's not a real word -- I'm sure there are many words in English that I don't know, especially technical terms in fields outside my own -- but I don't think it's in common use. Maybe it's a term familiar to linguists.
Mar
17
answered Native speakers never confuse sounds of 'ma'am' and 'man'?
Mar
17
comment What can I call a person who directs traffic?
In the U.S. you routinely see signs that say "Flagger Ahead", so I think "flagger" is the accepted (politically-correct) U.S. term. I wouldn't be surprised if the average construction worker still calls them "flag men", just like Americans routinely call the service people on airplanes "stewardesses" even though the politically correct term for a couple of decades now has been "flight attendants".
Mar
17
comment What can I call a person who directs traffic?
@gnawme Yes. These might be good descriptive terms, but they are not in common use, and while someone might guess what you mean if they heard them, then again they might not. If someone asked, "What is the term for a person who performs medical operations?", the right answer is "surgeon", not "medical operator", no matter how descriptive you might think the latter term is.
Mar
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
4
comment What is the word for something that has not yet been configured?
@tchrist I guess if you throw up, that's "uneaten food". :-)
Feb
28
comment How do you pronounce numbers written in different bases?
... I do not expect to use political terminology to describe a math problem, or to use Java to express my love for my wife. I do not expect a union contract to use the definition of "work" found in a physics book. Etc.
Feb
28
comment How do you pronounce numbers written in different bases?
@DavidSchwartz Much-belated reply: When we are reading decimal numbers, it makes sense to use decimal-based names. When we are reading octal numbers, it makes sense to use octal-based names. To say that English uses decimal-based names begs the question. English uses decimal-based names when talking about decimal numbers. Who says what sort of names we should use when talking abut non-decimal numbers? When we are talking about a different subject matter it makes sense to use a different set of terms. ...
Feb
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
6
comment Is “stepmother treatment” Indian English?
@FumbleFingers Hmm, someone asks if a certain idiom is common, and you say that this question is "not constructive" because you believe the answer is "yes"? So if the answer was "no" would you consider it a valid question? Your position presupposes that the poster knew the answer before he posted the question. If we disallow all questions to which the answer is "yes", then the site becomes superfluous, as the only possible answer is "no". We could simply have a single page that says, "No".
Feb
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
20
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
@ivanhoescott Whether such use is grammatically correct or not is, I think, a subject about which English speakers disagree. I don't dispute that you can find examples of such usage in printed texts. But you can also find many people who will say that such usage is wrong. As we've discussed on other threads, a problem with arguing about grammar is that it's difficult to say what constitutes proof that a certain position is right or wrong.
Jan
20
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
Well, sure, one can think of special cases where you could refer to a specific person and not know their gender. As you say, the anonymous author of a book, the person identified as doing a certain thing but that's all the speaker knows about that person ("The person who murdered Mr Boddy", "The inventor of the first wooden plow"), or a person with a name that could apply to either sex ("Robin", "Taylor", a name in a foreign language that we are not familiar with). But USUALLY, if you are talking about a specific person, you know their gender, which I think was Mr Reynold's point.
Jan
14
comment “World-famous” vs “internationally recognized”
I didn't say it was a true story. It's a joke. A joke on the idea that the British judge someone based on his family reputation rather than his individual achievement -- at least that's how American's see it. I'm sure the British have jokes about Americans.
Jan
14
comment “World-famous” vs “internationally recognized”
Reminds me of the story of an American company that asked an applicant's former employer, which was in the UK, for a letter of recommendation. They replied with a letter saying how Mr Smith came from a distinguished family, that his grandfather was a viscount and his uncle an admiral, etc. The American company sent a letter back saying, "Perhaps there has been some misunderstanding. We were considering hiring Mr Smith as an accountant, and not for breeding purposes."
Dec
17
comment Antonym for 'preaching to the choir'
That is an opposite of "preaching to the choir" ... but not in the sense that the questioner is asking for.
Dec
9
comment Kids addressing older people
@talmu If a child's teacher was also a family friend, I wouldn't be surprised to hear a child call her "Aunt Sally" at home but "Mrs Brown" at school. Just like, if I was in an environment where people routinely referred to each other by last name, I wouldn't break the pattern at the office for someone who happened to be a personal friend. Like, if I was introducing speakers at a convention, I wouldn't say, "The speakers today will be Mr Brown, Dr Miller, Bob, and Mrs Hoover." That would just be weird. Etc.
Dec
8
comment Kids addressing older people
@mitch In some circles, Ms is the default title. In other circles it's shunned. Use of this title has heavy social and political implications.
Dec
8
comment Kids addressing older people
@ae I live in the U.S. When I was a boy in the 1960s and 70s, I routinely addressed friends of my parents as "Uncle Joe", "Aunt Corinne", etc. I believe this was fairly common at the time. I have heard this usage more recently but I can't say how common it is. Note I am talking about addressing close family friends. As you say, I have never heard someone call a school janitor, a store clerk, etc, "Aunt <X>".