Reputation
24,885
Next tag badge:
98/100 score
28/20 answers
Badges
1 28 67
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~2.7m people reached

Jun
16
answered How did phobia ever come to mean hatred?
Jun
15
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
9
comment Is the term “you suck” always considered slang?
Huh, I've never understood "suck" to be obscene or vulgar, just slang. Yes, if you combine it with a word for male sexual organ it becomes vulgar, but you could say that about a lot of words. It may be that it originated from phrases for sexual acts, but many very polite and proper people that I know use the word to mean that something is bad. Like all vulgarities, of course, it's all in the consensus and the context.
Jun
9
answered Is the term “you suck” always considered slang?
Jun
2
answered 'Knows all the knicks and knacks of…' is this correct?
May
29
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@TusharRaj I understood you to be saying that something could have been a fact yesterday but not be a fact today. That is very different from saying that people THOUGHT it was a fact yesterday but today we know that it is not. If you meant the latter, well, that's not what you said. Maybe unclear wording.
May
29
answered Does a “fact” have to be true?
May
29
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
Except the poster said he was NOT asking for a philosophical discussion on the nature of truth, but simply a clarification on the definition of the word "fact".
May
29
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
Hmm, I have to disagree. I don't think this is at all the common understanding of the word "fact". If I said, "It is a fact of history that Columbus was the first European to reach America", I can't imagine someone saying, "No, that's not true. It's not a fact, because Columbus thought he was in India." Or to take your own example, if a person was convicted of a crime, and later there was overwhelming evidence that he was innocent, someone might very well say, "As it turns out, the fact is that he was innocent all along."
May
27
awarded  phrases
May
26
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
@nohat It's true that "you" can be either singular or plural. But I think this is a defect in English. It often creates unintentional ambiguities. The fact that our language is screwed up in one place isn't a good reason to screw it up in other places.
May
18
comment Proper term for people from eastern Asia
What offends people is hard to explain. I would think that if someone said, in a respectful tone, "Ah, the Oriental gentleman has arrived", there would be no reason to be offended. Well, "Yeah, those subhuman East Asian scum" sounds offensive to me. But what I think is offensive and what other people think is offensive are often unrelated.
May
17
awarded  Nice Question
May
3
comment Is “Next to that” really an alternative to “Additionally” or “Moreover”?
Search on "next to that" and most of the hits are talking about being physically adjacent, but I did find: bbc.com/news/world-europe-25364745 and quotes.dictionary.com/…
May
1
comment Is this a dangling participle? “To use the computer, it need to be powered.”
Which reminds me of the classic from the Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoon. I forget the exact words, but basically Bullwinkle says, "See this nail? When I nod my head, you hit it with the hammer."
May
1
comment Is this a dangling participle? “To use the computer, it need to be powered.”
That example naturally leads me to ask, If Mont Blanc were to turn around and look west, would it rise to a different height?
May
1
comment Is this a dangling participle? “To use the computer, it need to be powered.”
Revised draft: That said, most English speakers, with the notable exception of David Pugh, do not notice ...
May
1
comment Is “Next to that” really an alternative to “Additionally” or “Moreover”?
Yes, we disagree. I think we should fight to the death.
May
1
comment “Boyfriend” and “girlfriend” usage
@DavidPugh Oh, I thought you were saying she called herself that in English. Of course words can have different connotations in different times and places even when we are nominally speaking the same language. Connotations in a different language might well have little relation.
May
1
answered Can I describe time as “organic”?