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Oct
23
comment Correct use of semi-colon
Yes, if you're using it as an adjective, then don't use a semi-colon because the second clause could not stand as an independent sentence (nor satisfy one of the other conditions where a semi-colon is appropriate). You could simply change it to a comma.
Oct
23
comment proper usage of the word 'blitzkrieg'
@HotLicks As I have always understood the terms, "blitzkrieg" referred not to a bombing raid but to a ground offensive, with tactics that included air power but also tanks, artillery, etc. "The blitz" was a term the British used for the bombing of Britain. I don't know if the Germans used that terms.
Oct
23
comment proper usage of the word 'blitzkrieg'
No one says "let's Pearl Harbor this paperwork" because we don't use "Pearl Harbor" as a verb. But Americans often do say things like, "Wow, we didn't expect Foobar Company's new product to cut into our sales that much. That was a real Pearl Harbor on the widget market." I don't recall ever hearing someone use "9/11" as a metaphor for anything non-military. Whether that's because people consider it inappropriate or just because it hasn't caught on is hard to say.
Oct
23
comment proper usage of the word 'blitzkrieg'
I don't want to get into an argument about it, obviously what offends someone can be highly subjective. But Americans to this day routinely use "Pearl Harbor" to mean "something bad that happened without warning". So I don't think the issue is whether the person's own country suffered. At least there's more to it than that.
Oct
23
answered Correct use of semi-colon
Oct
23
answered proper usage of the word 'blitzkrieg'
Oct
22
comment Forming valid one word sentences
The issue is not an arbitrary rule that a sentence must contain at least 14 letters or some such, but rather that a sentence must contain a subject and a verb. If it has no subject, then who is doing the action? If it has no verb, then what are they doing? Imperatives can be just one word because the subject is an implied "you". A very long string of words could fail this test, like "The large gray house on the top of the hill with flowers all around and a long winding driveway" is not a complete sentence because it has no verb.
Oct
16
comment If cow = beef, pig = pork, and deer = venison, then where is the word for human = [flesh as food source]?
@JDługosz But "poultry" doesn't mean just the meat from chicken, turkies, etc. It can also refer to the live creatures. Personally I've never heard someone refer to bison meat as "beef". The grocery store certainly gives it a different label, namely "bison". On the other hand, farmers sometimes refer to cows as "beef", as in, "How many beef do you have on your farm?" At least they did when I went to college in Pennsylvania and had friends whose parents were farmers.
Oct
7
awarded  phrases
Sep
25
comment What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?
A "hole in the wall" could also be a bar. RE "shop", I don't think I'd refer to a small convenience store as a hole in the wall, but I wouldn't be surprised if someone did. I might well use the phrase for an unusual sort of small store, like a comic book store or something like that. Also, note that's a highly informal term. I wouldn't expect the Commerce Department to use it in official report. :-)
Sep
19
awarded  Yearling
Aug
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
17
comment Disagreement between subject and verb
I don't see how the referenced question is the same. That question asks, "Is this an error?" This question asks, "Is it acceptable to have this category of error?" That's not the same thing at all.
Aug
17
comment Are contractions worth all the trouble?
The point I was trying to make is that the rules aren't very complicated -- they can be summed up in a couple of sentences. Therefore, there is not a lot of effort involved. Therefore, it doesn't take much benefit for it to be "worth the effort".
Aug
17
answered 99% of people would do x
Aug
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
4
comment Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?
@ruakh Interesting point. Yes, the meaning does appear to be slightly different there.
Aug
3
comment Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?
@choster True that "renter" is ambiguous in the way you describe. Perhaps if you think of it in a certain way, renter/rentee makes sense. But the problem is that most people DON'T think of it that way in this case, and so most people would be confused by it. In some contexts you could say, "this is how I will use these words" and people would get it. Personally I think it's better to just use different words to avoid confusion.
Aug
3
comment Meaning of a henry ford quote
@mplungjan The wording just struck me as odd. If that was the intent, it seems funny to use the word "brain", which implies reason and thought. If I wanted to say that, I would have used "loud mouth" or "big mouth", which would be understood to imply argument. In other contexts Ford praised creativity and inventiveness. On the other hand I understand that he ran the company pretty autocratically.From a one sentence quote, one can only speculate. That's the problem I often have with quotes with no context.
Aug
3
answered What's the meaning of 'sorry lot' in Albert Einstein's quote?