22,193 reputation
12253
bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
age
visits member for 3 years
seen 2 days ago

May
31
awarded  Necromancer
May
28
comment “I want to be much than more” vs. “much then more”
Song lyrics are often poetic, or even cryptic. This one is more cryptic than most. I'm having trouble making any sense of pretty much anything in that song.
May
28
answered What does ‘Point Omega’ mean? Is it becoming a popular English word?
May
22
comment What to call someone who, apart from very inappropriate acts, doesn't care about what others think about him?
... people, you just don't think their attitude is a good thing.
May
22
comment What to call someone who, apart from very inappropriate acts, doesn't care about what others think about him?
@invoker Your comment seems to describe the opposite of a solipsist. Or are you trying to say that the only way one could not care about the opinions of others is if you didn't believe that others exist? Anyway, I don't see how not caring about the opinions of others is "impossible". Perhaps almost everyone has at least a few people whose opinions they care about. But can you say with certainly that never, in the history of the world, has there been someone who didn't care at all about the opinions of others? And then you say that it's a mental disorder, which implies there ARE such ...
May
22
answered What to call someone who, apart from very inappropriate acts, doesn't care about what others think about him?
May
22
answered “Are you kidding me?”- Is it grammatically correct?
May
22
comment Name for a word whose sound is contrary to its meaning
... is, it is not onomatopoeia. Like if I someone said that the fact that birds can fly is an example of rocketry, I would say no, it's not. I am not denying that birds fly, I am saying that their flight is not rocketry.
May
22
comment Name for a word whose sound is contrary to its meaning
... sounds beautiful to me, on what basis would you say I'm right or wrong? That's a totally subjective evaluation. Or to put it another way, pulchritude -- not the word, but the thing itself -- does not have a sound. I can make recordings of cows mooing and of people saying the word "moo" and compare them. I cannot make recordings of pulchritude to compare to people saying the word "pulchritude". The idea of your subjective opinion that the word pulchritude does not sound pretty has nothing to do with onomatopoeia. That's not to say that you can't discuss the idea, but whatever that idea ...
May
22
comment Name for a word whose sound is contrary to its meaning
@GreenAsJade As I said above, "onomatopoeia" refers to words for a sound that sound like that sound, like "buzz" for the sound of a bee, or to words for animals or objects where the word sounds like a sound made by that thing, like "cuckoo" as a name for a type of bird. Only a very tiny number of such words exist in English. This is not at all the same as saying that a word "sounds pretty" or "sounds ugly". We could debate how closely "moo" really resembles the sound a cow makes, but it is clearly at least generally in the right direction. But if I say that the word "aardvark" ...
May
19
comment Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
... something more like, "Stop being stupid and get on the train." But you can't analyze grammar on the basis of the true, inner meaning that the speaker intended to convey.
May
19
comment Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
@EdwinAshworth I certainly do not say that if X can be substituted for Y in a sentence than both must be the same part of speech! I agree, that would be absurd. "I called him loudly." "Loudly" is an adverb. "I called him Fred." Therefore Fred must be an adverb? But consider a more conventional word for these examples. Suppose I said, "Get on the stupid train!" Of course "stupid" here doesn't make much literal sense. It is meaningless to discuss the intelligence of a train. But nevertheless, grammatically, "stupid" is an adjective modifying "train". Yes, what I really mean is probably ...
May
19
comment Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
@Emmanuel As an adjective "freaking" makes grammatical sense, just like "barking" or "sleeping", etc. We routinely turn a verb into an adjective by adding -ing. "The damn dog" should be "The damned dog" to be grammatically correct. Though again, I doubt the speaker is really commenting on the future of the dog's soul. A "barking dog" is a dog who is presently or habitually engaged in barking; a "kicked dog" is a dog who has been the target of a kick. Similarly for other verbs used as adjectives.
May
19
answered Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
May
19
comment Upstairs/downstairs neighbors
Except that doesn't make the distinction the poster asks for. You could say "the fellow residents of my neighborhood" or "the fellow residents of my town" just as well as "the fellow resident of my building". Without additional words to specify, no one would know which you meant.
May
16
answered Noun for someone whose secret has been discovered?
May
16
answered Upstairs/downstairs neighbors
May
16
awarded  Nice Answer
May
5
comment Groups of Books
@FuzzyMcNubNubs I think that would still be considered a "series". Especially in science fiction and fantasy where you might have many stories set in the same fictional world or universe. People talk about Niven's Known Space series, Asimov's Foundation series, Baum's Oz series, what-his-name's Discworld series, etc.
May
5
comment Comparative adjectives cannot have -er ending
Perhaps I'm misunderstanding what the OP's source on this said -- I have nothing to go on but his excerpt. But he quotes the original source as saying, "Adjectives which gave a comparative or superlative signification do not admit the addition of ... the terminations, er, est ... the following examples break this rule:" That sounds to me like it's saying that IN GENERAL, you can't add -er to a word that is already a comparative or -est to a word that is already a superlative, but then they go on to give "examples that break this rule", i.e. exceptions to the general rule. Like "lesser".