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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
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Sep
15
comment “Measure” vs. “measurement”
@RogerWernersson Yes.
Sep
12
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
12
comment Can the verb “wonder” simply take an object?
@EdwinAshworth Hmm, I only find 8 hits in Bing on "I wonder he didn't". One is an ad where they fill in your search term, so that doesn't count. (I once was doing some research on the history of slavery and typed in "black slaves". I got back a hit from a certain shopping website with the title "Best prices on black slaves!") Two of them are quotes from Charles Dickens, fitting the idea of obsolete usage. Two are translations from Japanese, which I would not expect to be good English grammar. And the other three are "I wonder if he didn't ..." which is what I would expect in modern English.
Sep
11
comment Can the verb “wonder” simply take an object?
@EdwinAshworth I think that's one of the "obsolete constructions" Barrie was referring to. You see that in old books but not so much today.
Sep
11
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
8
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
@EricLloyd I agree that "Chinaman" is archaic, and that some view it as pejorative. Exactly why is hard to say. The Irish were discriminated against at one time too, and no one says that "Irish" is pejorative. Nor is "Chinese" considered pejorative. Exactly what makes one word derogatory and another complimentary is not at all clear to me. But whatever, not the main point here.
Sep
5
comment Is the construction “maker of all universe” grammatical in any English dialect?
@kris I did an ngram search and went through some of these references. Most of these are not really the phrase "all universe" but there's some other punctuation in there, like "it is part of the all, universe". A couple had "stars in the (something something parenthesis ALL) universe". A few mentioned an "All-Universe Competition". There were several that had numerous grammar problems of which "all universe" was just one. There do appear to be some Indian metaphysical books that talk about "all universe", so perhaps this is an accepted usage in Indian English.
Sep
5
comment Is the construction “maker of all universe” grammatical in any English dialect?
Not related to the original question, but this brings up the thought: If your child asks why he should study grammar, one answer is: So you can recognize spam emails. If you get an email that claims to be from a big company or the government, and it contains multiple grammar errors, it is almost surely fake. Every now and then a big organization will send out an email that has a grammar error, but very rarely more than one.
Sep
5
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
@grimxn Yeah, that's my point. At least for the Scottish question, we have a general word: "British". For the Netherlands, to the best of my knowledge, we don't, and so we use Dutch for all of them. BTW reminds me of a World War 2 movie I saw years ago, where a representative from the military is sent to tell a family that their son has been killed in action. He tries to console them by saying, "He died fighting for England." And the father replies harshly, "He was Scottish." Leaving the army guy stammering.
Sep
5
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
@grimxn Yes, I've heard that too, didn't go into it as it was a side note on the main subject. I think 99.9% of Americans would call anyone from the Netherlands "Dutch", and to the best of my knowledge we have no more general term. Happy to hear if anyone has more information on this.
Sep
5
answered Is the construction “maker of all universe” grammatical in any English dialect?
Sep
4
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
Americans, at least, routinely say that someone is "a German" or "a Canadian". We most definitely do not say "a French", but rather "a French person" or "from France". Maybe usage in other English-speaking countries is different.
Sep
4
answered Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
Sep
4
comment Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?
I thought the word for someone from Britain was "Limey" ...
Sep
2
comment Word/phrase for taking the pilot out of the equation in turning a piloted aircraft into a UAV
An "automated" process or machine may or may not have human supervision. In practice, I think outside of science fiction any machine has SOME level of human supervision, some person who programs it or sets its controls in some way. If there is very little human control, people call it "a fully autonomous automated process", as opposed to a "semi-autonomous automated process". If it was "non-autonomous" I think that would mean it isn't automated at all, so it's not a very meaningful term.
Sep
2
comment Word that refers to both input and output devices
@Lumberjack's answer -- "I/O devices" -- is the commonly-used term. I don't think there'd be anything to gain by finding a more obscure term or making up a new one.
Sep
2
comment A word to describe someone or something that is not last?
I'm not aware of a single word that expresses this idea. I'd just say "all but the last" or similar.
Sep
2
comment What is a synonym for “girlfriend”?
@MartinMcCallion I did say "and couples living together". I was referring to heterosexual couples there. Sorry if that wasn't clear.
Sep
2
comment What is a synonym for “girlfriend”?
@MartinMcCallion UK usage may be different, and for something like this there might be sub-cultures here in the U.S. that would use the word differently. But I don't recall ever hearing a man refer to a woman whom he was dating, i.e. not living with, as his "partner". I can't insist that it might not be used that way in social or cultural circles different from my own, but I don't recall ever hearing such usage.
Aug
29
answered Why We Need To Know About Hyperboles