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bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
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May
2
comment He flew like the wind
@FumbleFingers Aww, give the poster a break. I don't think is question is whether "like" or "as" is, in fact, commonly used, but rather WHY "like" is used rather than "as".
May
2
answered He flew like the wind
May
2
answered Comparative adjectives cannot have -er ending
May
1
revised Is there lunchtime analogue of the 'breakfast of champions' idiom?
amplification
May
1
comment Is there lunchtime analogue of the 'breakfast of champions' idiom?
Yes. I've never read the novel, but I see there's a Wikipedia page on it that includes the statement, "The title, taken from the well-known slogan for Wheaties breakfast cereal, crops up in a key scene late in the novel when a waitress, apparently ironically, says "Breakfast of Champions" each time she serves a customer a martini." Which, amusingly enough, rather parallels my answer above.
May
1
answered Is there lunchtime analogue of the 'breakfast of champions' idiom?
May
1
answered Is “Civic Virtue” related to moral in this context?
May
1
comment How many spaces should come after a period/full stop?
@supercat Interesting thought. So okay, "etc. " (one space) is an abbreviation but "blah blah. " (two spaces) is the end of a sentence. I suppose if you're doing full justification, for example, you'd want to add more space after a sentence than after an abbreviation. That's not 100%, though, as someone could use spaces to line up columns, for example.
Apr
29
comment What does 'put somebody up' actually mean, and where does the phrase originate?
If you want to know the origin of the phrase just for general interest and amusement, okay, cool. (I have no idea myself.) If you think it will help you learn the language or prove something, you will likely be disappointed.
Apr
22
comment “Some” — singular vs plural
"Of Bob" indicates a possessive. I think "of Bob's" is redundant -- you're indicating the possessive with "of" and then again with the apostrophe-s. People often say that, and I don't suppose it creates ambiguity, but I think it's unnecessary.
Apr
7
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@F.E. Well, I don't want to turn this into an argument. I think our disagreement here is just over the best way to explain it rather than the underlying facts, and if that's the case, anyone reading this thread has now see both pedagogical theories. Feel free to reply to my last posts, but if anything further you may say leaves me with nothing new to add, I'll just let it end there rather than shouting "says you!" and going in another circle. :-)
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
... I don't understand what you're trying to say. It could be a participle, i.e. a verb that is used as an adjective, or it could be an adjective that is spelled the same as the verb and that has the same meaning as a participle. I don't see the difference there. If two words are spelled the same, mean the same thing, and have the same function in the sentence, in what way are they different?
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
I was trying to explain that often, the past participle -- and as I say, I deliberately avoided using that word for simplicity sake -- looks the same as the past tense form, but not always. As far as I can tell you are agreeing with me on every point and then saying that I am wrong. Okay, you are using different terminology, like saying "the words have the same shape" rather than saying "they are the same word". Is that the substance of your criticism? That they're not the same word, they're two different words that have the same letters in the same order? As to your last sentence, ...
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@f.e. Yes, a verb that is being used as an adjective is called a participle. I was trying to avoid introducing another term to keep the discussion as simple as possible. If you want to say that it's incorrect to say that it IS a past tense, but rather I should say it LOOKS LIKE the past tense or is SPELLED THE SAME AS the past tense, well, okay. But I don't it's helpful to someone trying to learn the language to simply tell him the name of the thing he wants to do. You have to give him some hints how to actually do it.
Mar
24
comment Is it ever more appropriate to use “cognizant” over “aware”?
I'd vote for "fully functional" if the sentence was intended to be at least relatively serious. If I was being totally flippant I'd say "conscious".
Mar
24
comment Referring to adult-age sons and daughters as children
... "my child" surprising. Like, "What is the age of your oldest child?"
Mar
24
comment Referring to adult-age sons and daughters as children
@FumbleFingers It's not so much singulars and plurals, but a group of mixed sex versus single sex. If my father was referring to one of my brothers and I, he might say "my children" or he might say "my sons". But if it's a son and a daughter, well, he could say "my son and my daughter", but it's easier to just say "my children". Of course one person must be one sex or the other (well, barring someone undergoing a sex change operation or some such I guess), so then I'd expect the person to normally say "my son" or "my daughter". In cases where it is indeterminate gender, I wouldn't find ...
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@F.E. "often use the past-tense version of the verb" I believe that's true. "lost cause", "failed attempt", "threatened invasion", "rebuilt city", "borrowed money" ... I can think of many examples. Note I didn't say "always", I said "often", and I gave several counter examples.
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@Neil Your example -- "is falling to the floor" -- resembles the example in this sentence, but it is a grammatically different construction. "The page is falling" and "The page is blue" both have a word after "is", but in the first case it is a verb and in the second it is an adjective. Just because you can replace word A with word B in a sentence and get a result that makes sense doesn't mean that A and B must be the same part of speech.