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bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
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Oct
7
comment When is my son's first birthday?
@DavidMulder Well, now I'll have to start studying every form I see. I wouldn't say that no one, ever, in the history of the world, has labeled a space on a form "Birthday" and expected to get the month, day, and year of the person's birth. But from my anecdotal experience, it's very rare. Now I'll have to do a statistical study. I wonder if I can get a government grant.
Oct
7
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
7
awarded  Enlightened
Oct
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
6
comment When is my son's first birthday?
BTW If you used "birthday" to mean the original event, it's not clear what a "second birthday" would mean. Unless you believe in re-incarnation. Well, I suppose there is John 3:4.
Oct
6
answered When is my son's first birthday?
Oct
2
comment When is it appropriate to use the title “Miss” as opposed to “Ms.”?
Actually I rarely call anyone "Mr". I pretty much only use that when I don't know his first name. I've introduced people to speak at conferences and I never say "Mr Fred Smith", I always just say "Fred smith". But if I didn't know his first name, I'd say "Mr Smith" as opposed to just "Smith". More to the point, I've never heard a man object to being called "Mr". While using no title at all for a woman might seem disrespectful, using a title she objects to would, I think, be more disrespectful still. Bringing me back to, you have to listen to what she calls herself, or ask her.
Sep
30
answered Synonym of “incorrect” with as little negative connotation as possible
Sep
25
comment In a software meant to be used internationally, should I use “post code”, “postal code” or “zip code”?
If you are only accepting addresses from a small number of countries, like only from the US, UK, and Australia, it would make sense to switch between "zip code" for the US, "postcode" for the UK, and ... whatever Aussies call their code. But if you're accepting addresses from anywhere in the world, just looking up what they all call their equivalent would be a daunting task. I suppose once you had the list you could just toss it in a database and read the record for the appropriate country. Do the work once and you can re-use the list for many projects.
Sep
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
comment Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
Side note: In the U.S. we would say "vacation" and not "holiday". A holiday here is a day for some specific celebration or commemoration, like Christmas or Independence Day, and is always a single day. When you take time off work and go somewhere for fun, that's a "vacation". As I understand it, in the U.K. they call that "going on holiday", in the U.S. it's "going on vacation".
Sep
24
comment Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
I suppose if I heard someone say "I'm going on an international vacation", I probably wouldn't question it, but it's not something I recall hearing anyone say. Just BTW, in the U.S. we would say "vacation", not "holiday".
Sep
23
comment Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
@choster Yes, "foreign" CAN simply mean "different", as in, "The atmosphere at my mother-in-law's house is totally foreign to me", meaning, very different from how I live. But if we talk about a "foreign city", we almost always mean a city in another country. I have never heard someone from New York call Los Angeles a "foreign city", except as a joke. Likewise a "foreign automobile" means one built in another country, not another state, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.
Sep
23
answered Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
Sep
23
comment When do you use middle and when center?
@MartinSmith Yeah, but I strongly suspect they did that just because they didn't want to use the same name for both.
Sep
22
comment What is the meaning of the expression 'put in leave'?
In the U.S. we often say "put in for leave" meaning to request vacation time from one's job. I don't know whether in South Africa the idiom is "put in leave" or whether that's a typo to drop the "for".
Sep
22
answered When do you use middle and when center?
Sep
19
awarded  Yearling
Sep
16
comment “Measure” vs. “measurement”
Maybe I need to back up a step and clarify what you're asking. If I measure my height and then I measure my weight, I have taken 2 measurements. Are you asking if that is properly said "height and weight are 2 measurements" versus "height and weight are a measurement"? If there are 2 of them, it seems to me that's obviously a plural, but maybe I'm missing your point.