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Mar
25
comment “God's own country”
@0xC0000022L All I can say is to I repeat that I've never heard that phrasing in such a context. I certainly don't deny that SOMEONE might have said it: obviously I don't know everything ever said by every English-speaking person in history. It's possible that I've heard it a couple of times and forgotten. But it's not something commonly said by people I know, found in the books or web sites I read, etc. It may be common to some sub-group of English speakers that I am not a part of. I'd be interested if other Americans would weigh in on this. Have you heard this, and if so, where?
Mar
25
comment “God's own country”
@elian Sure, I see that the examples came from the page you linked, not you. And before I made my post I checked that you had not "corrupted" them in some way, but no, that's the original. As to the google.fr links: The first is clearly by someone expressing an idea he disagrees with, so without a direct quote from the people he is attacking, I'd be slow to assume that is what his opponents actually say. The second I could only see one paragraph from the book, so I'm not sure what the full context was.
Mar
25
revised “God's own country”
spelling error
Mar
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
25
comment “God's own country”
From a Jewish/Christian point of view, the Israelis are "God's people" so I presume Israel is literally "God's own country". :-)
Mar
25
revised “God's own country”
added 841 characters in body
Mar
25
answered “God's own country”
Mar
21
comment Word to describe person who is rich in wealth, but is poor in class?
@Mari-LouA My intent wasn't to say that Mr Grimm was lying. :-) Rather, I was simply trying to highlight that he identified the statement as Australian, and indeed it is not used in other English-speaking countries. Then I wonderered if it is used in ANY other English-speaking countries or if it is solely Australian.
Mar
21
comment Word to describe person who is rich in wealth, but is poor in class?
Note this is Australian. An American would not say this. Any Brits, Canadians, Indians, etc care to weigh in if this is something they would say?
Mar
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
3
answered How to ask about delivering time of a product?
Feb
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
25
answered Usage of “place” for business premises
Feb
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
19
answered untypical, atypical, nontypical
Feb
19
comment “olfactory” and “factory” - just a coincidence?
@HotLicks I thought an "etymology factory" is a place where they make etymologies.
Feb
16
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
(a) I didn't say your answer was ambigous: I said it only applied to specific cases and not to the general case. (b) I'm claiming that this is the term actually used by English-speaking people. I don't claim to have invented it, so if you want to say that it was a mistake for people to adopt this term, okay, go ahead, no skin off my nose.
Feb
16
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
@Mari-LouA Sure, but that only works in the specific case. If you want to talk specifically about a white parent adopting black children, you can say, "she adopted a black child". Etc for other combinations. But if you want to discuss in general the idea of parents of one race adopting children of a different race, you can't say "adopting black children". We're trying to be general. You can't say, "adopting ethnic minorities" -- the parent may be the minority. Etc.
Feb
16
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
I looked for definitions of "allogeneous" and found 2: "different in type or kind" as you quote, and also "from a different individual of the same species". The latter seems by far the more common usage, at least based on web searches. It's apparently a medical term used when describing transplants.
Feb
16
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
@Mari-LouA No, sorry if my post was unclear. I didn't mean that a non-white in a white-majority society is not an "ethnic minority". I meant that saying that you could describe a child who is a different race from his parents as an "ethnic minority" only works if the parent if of the majority. In a mostly white society, if a black parent adopts a white child, it would clearly be inaccurate to say that the parent had adopted an ethnic minority.