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Jun
21
comment Can you use the same word twice?
... assume that because he walked there that it must be a shoe store. Anyway, we've both said our piece on this, don't want a drawn out argument Feel free to get in the last word.
Jun
21
comment Can you use the same word twice?
@DavidRicherby Sure. If someone said, "I decided I needed a new car. So I drove to the dealership ...", I would logically assume he meant a car dealership. If someone said, "I decided I needed a new refrigerator. So I drove my car to the dealership ..." I would assume he meant an appliance dealership. If someone just said, "I drove my car to the dealership ..." with no previous reference, I would have no idea what sort of dealership. The assumption that it must be a car dealership because he drove there would be absurd. Exactly like if someone said, "I walked to the store ...", I would not ...
Jun
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
19
comment Can you use the same word twice?
@DavidRicherby But in your version of the sentence, the only reference to cars is what I drove to the dealership. Why would a reader assume that just because I drove a car to a store, that that store must sell cars? Suppose I rode a bicycle the car dealership. Then the sentence becomes, "I rode a bicycle to the dealership, where I bought a new one." How would a reader know it was a car dealership? Would you now assume it's a bicycle dealership? If I said I walked there, would you assume it's a shoe store?
Jun
19
comment Can you use the same word twice?
@JanusBahsJacquet Oh, good point. That didn't occur to me.
Jun
19
comment Can you use the same word twice?
... Cars are a very common form of transportation. I use my car to go to the grocery store and the bank and the park and lots of places that have nothing to do with cars. Of course the meaning MIGHT be clear from the larger context, like if the preceding sentence was "I decided to buy a new car." But that just moves the repetition from the quoted sentence to the previous context.
Jun
19
comment Can you use the same word twice?
@DavidRicherby That was, of course, intended to be an extreme example. But sometimes you really do need to repeat the same concept because the same concept is coming up more than once. In your version, for example, you just say "dealership". How does the reader know you mean a car dealership and not, say, an appliance dealership? "Bought a new one." A new one of what? I could certainly drive my car to a boat dealership or many sorts of dealership. Indeed we would not normally assume that just because you drove somewhere in your car that the place you are going has anything to do with cars. ...
Jun
19
comment Is there a specific word for “goes without being said”?
Sure. There are lots of things that "everyone knows" that ain't so. We laugh at dumb things people believed hundreds of years ago. I'm sure that hundreds of years from now people will be laughing at the crazy things that all those dumb 21st century people believed.
Jun
19
answered Is there a specific word for “goes without being said”?
Jun
19
comment Is there a specific word for “goes without being said”?
Just to nitpick: "X is true" and "Everyone knows that X is true" are not the same thing. There are lots of things that are true but that many people don't know. "Minsk is the capital of Belarus." A true statement. But I'm quite sure that there are many people in the world who do not know this.
Jun
19
comment Word for winning because the competitors were miraculously all worse
@LittleEva I think you're confusing God with Bruce Jenner.
Jun
19
answered Word for winning because the competitors were miraculously all worse
Jun
19
comment Word for winning because the competitors were miraculously all worse
Amusing as it is, I don't think this is really a valid answer to the question. Divine intervention could be responsible for a lot of things other than someone being lucky enough to have no serious competition in a game. And -- barring the theory that everything that happens in the universe is the direct result of God's will -- you could have no serious competition out of shear luck, having nothing to do with divine intervention. There's an overlap, but the two ideas are not at all the same.
Jun
19
comment Word for winning because the competitors were miraculously all worse
@YohannV. Assuming that God is an intelligent being, he wouldn't favor and assist all competitors who believe in him. He'd favor and assist those whose victory furthered his long-term goals. His goals presumably include doing nice things for his followers, but surely God has bigger goals in mind than doling out easy, unearned wins in baseball games. :-)
Jun
19
comment Can you use the same word twice?
"Die a _____ death": Hard to see how else you could say that. I suppose you could say "experience a _____ death" or "suffer a _____ death". As to "lead a ____ life", "lead" and "life" aren't really related. you can lead many things other than a life. Like you can lead a horse to water as long as you don't try to make him drink.
Jun
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
19
comment Can “if”, “while”, “whenever”, “when” recurse deeply? How deeply?
... possible to construct something that would work, but it would have to be hugely complex. Computer languages are trivially simple compared to common English speech. I don't know why you're trying to do this. Say you succeeded, and wrote this BNF that's 10,000 pages long or whatever it would take. What would you do with it? What's the point?
Jun
19
comment Can “if”, “while”, “whenever”, “when” recurse deeply? How deeply?
Seems that the examples you give above show that your BNF has very little relation to what is actually considered good, comprehensible, grammatically correct English. You seem to be saying, "My BNF works, there's just the small detail that it produces lots of sentences that aren't valid English and fails to produce lots of sentences that are", well, hmm, isn't that the definition of "doesn't work"? I strongly suspect that trying to write a BNF for English is hopeless. As others have said, it's just the wrong tool for the job. Natural language is just not that structured. Maybe it' ...
Jun
19
answered Can you use the same word twice?
Jun
17
comment How did phobia ever come to mean hatred?
... and not simply a disagreement about what is best for society, you can prejudice people against your opponents.