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bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
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comment “Some” — singular vs plural
"Of Bob" indicates a possessive. I think "of Bob's" is redundant -- you're indicating the possessive with "of" and then again with the apostrophe-s. People often say that, and I don't suppose it creates ambiguity, but I think it's unnecessary.
Apr
7
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@F.E. Well, I don't want to turn this into an argument. I think our disagreement here is just over the best way to explain it rather than the underlying facts, and if that's the case, anyone reading this thread has now see both pedagogical theories. Feel free to reply to my last posts, but if anything further you may say leaves me with nothing new to add, I'll just let it end there rather than shouting "says you!" and going in another circle. :-)
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
... I don't understand what you're trying to say. It could be a participle, i.e. a verb that is used as an adjective, or it could be an adjective that is spelled the same as the verb and that has the same meaning as a participle. I don't see the difference there. If two words are spelled the same, mean the same thing, and have the same function in the sentence, in what way are they different?
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
I was trying to explain that often, the past participle -- and as I say, I deliberately avoided using that word for simplicity sake -- looks the same as the past tense form, but not always. As far as I can tell you are agreeing with me on every point and then saying that I am wrong. Okay, you are using different terminology, like saying "the words have the same shape" rather than saying "they are the same word". Is that the substance of your criticism? That they're not the same word, they're two different words that have the same letters in the same order? As to your last sentence, ...
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@f.e. Yes, a verb that is being used as an adjective is called a participle. I was trying to avoid introducing another term to keep the discussion as simple as possible. If you want to say that it's incorrect to say that it IS a past tense, but rather I should say it LOOKS LIKE the past tense or is SPELLED THE SAME AS the past tense, well, okay. But I don't it's helpful to someone trying to learn the language to simply tell him the name of the thing he wants to do. You have to give him some hints how to actually do it.
Mar
24
comment Is it ever more appropriate to use “cognizant” over “aware”?
I'd vote for "fully functional" if the sentence was intended to be at least relatively serious. If I was being totally flippant I'd say "conscious".
Mar
24
comment Referring to adult-age sons and daughters as children
... "my child" surprising. Like, "What is the age of your oldest child?"
Mar
24
comment Referring to adult-age sons and daughters as children
@FumbleFingers It's not so much singulars and plurals, but a group of mixed sex versus single sex. If my father was referring to one of my brothers and I, he might say "my children" or he might say "my sons". But if it's a son and a daughter, well, he could say "my son and my daughter", but it's easier to just say "my children". Of course one person must be one sex or the other (well, barring someone undergoing a sex change operation or some such I guess), so then I'd expect the person to normally say "my son" or "my daughter". In cases where it is indeterminate gender, I wouldn't find ...
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@F.E. "often use the past-tense version of the verb" I believe that's true. "lost cause", "failed attempt", "threatened invasion", "rebuilt city", "borrowed money" ... I can think of many examples. Note I didn't say "always", I said "often", and I gave several counter examples.
Mar
24
comment verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
@Neil Your example -- "is falling to the floor" -- resembles the example in this sentence, but it is a grammatically different construction. "The page is falling" and "The page is blue" both have a word after "is", but in the first case it is a verb and in the second it is an adjective. Just because you can replace word A with word B in a sentence and get a result that makes sense doesn't mean that A and B must be the same part of speech.
Mar
23
comment Is “Is it a girl or a boy?” really calling the infant an “it”?
@Marthaª Maybe. But consider, "I found this strange blue object in the parking lot." "What is it?" Versus, "Someone is knocking on the door." "Who is it?" The two constructions seem essentially the same to me.
Mar
23
answered “Bikeway” vs. “bike route” vs. “bike path” vs. “bike trail” vs. “bike track” vs. “bike lane” on US road signs
Mar
23
answered usage of indefinite articles
Mar
23
answered verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?
Mar
23
comment Is “Is it a girl or a boy?” really calling the infant an “it”?
RE refer to unborn as "it": That's not excusive to the unborn. We routinely use similar constructions for adults. Like the phone rings and we say, "Who is it?", not "Who is he or she?" Or "Who is managing this project?" "It's Bob." Etc.
Mar
23
comment Is “Is it a girl or a boy?” really calling the infant an “it”?
@schodge "A new parent who is offended by that is going to be offended quite a bit for the first few weeks." Someone who is offended by something like routine grammar is going to spend his entire life being offended. Not to say that there aren't plenty of such people out there.
Mar
10
comment The correct use of the word “vicariously”
@TecBrat Your suggestion is completely true, and I think we're agreeing about redundancy. Saying the same thing two different ways is not always bad. It is a positive good if it makes the meaning clear in cases where it might be ambiguous or confusing. It is only bad when the meaning is obvious the first time. I recall a lecture I once heard on public speaking where the speaker said that in any speech, "Tell them what you're going to tell them, tell them, then tell them what you told them." His point being, making your point absolutely clear.
Mar
5
comment Referring to adult-age sons and daughters as children
@FumbleFingers I'm 55. And yes, I would think it odd if my father said "I'd like you to meet my child, Jay" for two reasons: (1) If he was only referring to one person -- me -- I'd expect him to use the more specific "son". But if he was referring to me and to one of my sisters, I wouldn't find "my children, Jay and Sandy" at all odd. And (2) My father has been dead for two years, so I would be rather surprised if he said anything at all.
Mar
5
comment Referring to adult-age sons and daughters as children
@FumbleFingers Huh, I guess words can have different connotations to different people. When the insurance company asks me if I have any children I want covered under the policy, I don't take that as any sort of insult to my children's maturity. If my mother were to say, "These are my children Jay and Sandy", I can't imagine that I'd find that insulting or demeaning. That's just ... what the word means.