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 word-usage
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Apr
29
answered What does it mean when someone calls himself “non sequitur”?
Apr
24
answered Using similar meaning verbs in paralel sentences
Apr
22
comment Can less be used without any comparison?
Yes. Though note that there can be an implied comparison. Like, in Romeo and Juliet, Juliet's mother tells her that she should marry the wealthy Paris, because, "So shall you share all that he doth possess, By having him, making yourself no less." No less than what? That what she has now. Etc.
Apr
21
comment Can I use “clipper” for someone whose hobby is watching and sharing video clips?
@sgr If it's specifically on YouTube, then yes, YouTuber is a term I've heard and that, in any case, would likely be instantly understood. If YouTube is just an example and the OP wants a word that means someone who produces and shares video clips anywhere, I don't think "YouTuber" would be broad enough.
Apr
21
answered not “conduction”, but ___?
Apr
21
comment Can I use “clipper” for someone whose hobby is watching and sharing video clips?
True. Sadly, I will probably never be one. There may be other definitions out there, but as I say, not the one the OP is asking about.
Apr
21
answered Can I use “clipper” for someone whose hobby is watching and sharing video clips?
Apr
6
answered Meaning of 'Energy Lease'
Apr
5
comment A strong antonym for “dictator”?
Well, I'm not going to get into a political debate on a language forum. Just want readers to realize this is a debatable political position, not a statement of fact.
Apr
5
awarded  word-usage
Apr
4
comment What does “on day 50” mean?
in normal English we understand "day 1" or "the first day" to be the day some event started, and count from there. If a time period started on April 1, than April 1 is "day 1" or "the first day", Aprili 2 is "day 2" or "the second day", etc. Other ways of counting are possible, and you could argue are better, but they're not how people normally count and require explanation if used.
Apr
4
comment Does a group overlap another group?
"Non-empty intersection" is accurate, but would be unlikely to be used among people who are not mathematicians. "Some people are in both groups" is probably the most clear and unambiguos. Two groups could "overlap" or "intersect" in ways other than the list of members, for example the list of responsibilities, or physical locations occupied.
Apr
4
comment A strong antonym for “dictator”?
"Liberator" has the connotation of a revolutionary, someone overthrowing the powers that be to free the people. If the principal is fighting against the school board or federal authorities, it might be appropriate. But I think the OP here simply means, "one who listens to opinions and advice from others", or "one who lets people under his authority act autonomously".
Apr
4
comment A strong antonym for “dictator”?
Umm, public schools in the U.S. are run by government, not business interests. Theoretically by local government, though more and more by state and fedeal. Perhaps you're making a political comment, that you believe government is all controlled by big business? But even if so, I'd think schools would be among the organs of government that business interests have the least interest in.
Apr
4
comment A strong antonym for “dictator”?
This answer makes the most sense in the context that the OP presents. Other answers may be valid if we were talking about a literal dictator, i.e. a ruler over a nation. But that's not the context here.
Apr
4
comment A strong antonym for “dictator”?
@Karnivaurus I think you mean "fascist".
Mar
25
comment “God's own country”
On the slightly relevant side: Okay, if you interpret "God's country" to mean "the country where God was born", that's an absurd and meaningless idea to a Jew or Christian, as God wasn't born anywhere. But if you understand it to mean, "a country which God has chosen as his own special place", Israel fits that description in Judeo-Christian teaching. Like the difference between "my house" meaning "the place where I live", and "my house" meaning "this place that I designed and built with my own hands and of which I am very proud". (Well, God was born in Israel in the person of Jesus, but, etc.)
Mar
25
comment “God's own country”
@0xC0000022L RE "beleif": Oops, sorry, fixed. I really should be more careful about typos on an English Language website -- could send someone running to the dictionary to look up non-existant words.
Mar
25
comment “God's own country”
@0xC0000022L All I can say is to I repeat that I've never heard that phrasing in such a context. I certainly don't deny that SOMEONE might have said it: obviously I don't know everything ever said by every English-speaking person in history. It's possible that I've heard it a couple of times and forgotten. But it's not something commonly said by people I know, found in the books or web sites I read, etc. It may be common to some sub-group of English speakers that I am not a part of. I'd be interested if other Americans would weigh in on this. Have you heard this, and if so, where?
Mar
25
comment “God's own country”
@elian Sure, I see that the examples came from the page you linked, not you. And before I made my post I checked that you had not "corrupted" them in some way, but no, that's the original. As to the google.fr links: The first is clearly by someone expressing an idea he disagrees with, so without a direct quote from the people he is attacking, I'd be slow to assume that is what his opponents actually say. The second I could only see one paragraph from the book, so I'm not sure what the full context was.