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17h
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
@sumelic Oops, that's what comes of googling for an example and grabbing the first hit without reading it closely.
17h
revised Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
bad example
21h
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
Wow, from the tone of some of the comments you'd think the OP was saying that he's planning to call for the extermination of everyone whom this word describes! Are race relations so bad that we can't even use the word "race" in a sentence without everybody getting jumpy? How sad.
21h
answered Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
21h
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
This could work in a specific case, but not necessarily in the general case. Like if you wanted to discuss statistics about adoptions of children of a different race from the parents, regardless of whether it's white adopting black, black adopting white, or purple adopting orange, clearly "adopting ethnic minorities" would be very inaccurate.
22h
comment Is there a word for “a person from another race”?
These words may technically meet the required definition, but they are not by any stretch of the imagination common English words that would be understood in a casual context.
1d
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2d
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Feb
10
answered In “X number”, should X be singular?
Feb
10
answered “Butcher shops” sell meat products, what is the name of a shop that sells cheese and ice cream?
Jan
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
28
comment Difference between “per” and “a”
@FumbleFingers Yeah, it was a while ago. The question just showed up with a new comment or a vote or something.
Dec
27
comment Difference between “per” and “a”
@BrettReynolds Hmm, but in "I'm going this week", "this week" acts as an adverb saying when you are going. But in "goes three times a week", I don't see any relationship established between "a week" and either "goes" or "three times".
Dec
27
comment Difference between “per” and “a”
@FumbleFingers Headlines and titles are not generally the best models for good grammar.
Dec
25
comment What do you call a person who refuses to do something/certain things?
@einpoklum The point I was trying to make was that, to the best of my knowledge, there is no general word in English for "someone who refuses to do something", where the word would apply no matter what the thing they are refusing to do is and no matter their reasons. I was attempting to be somewhat whimsical in giving examples of what you might call someone who refused to do certain specific things for specific reasons. Yes, none of the words I used are specifically related to refusing in general, they are all reasons for refusing to do a specific thing.
Dec
24
answered What do you call a person who refuses to do something/certain things?
Dec
24
comment N.B. (Nota Bene) vs P.S. (Post Script)
@AlanK Could be. I can only say that I do not recall ever seeing it used, and I think I'm pretty well educated and well read. Maybe I've seen it now and then and glossed over it. I work in the computer business too so if it was common in that industry but not elsewhere, I'd be among the first to know it. I'm not saying you're wrong, just that I can't corroborate your statement.
Dec
24
comment A good response to holiday greeting from professor?
I think you're trying too hard. It's very common in English to give casual greetings and response, "Have a nice day." "You, too" Etc. Yes, you CAN be more creative. But such greetings are pretty much stock formulas. If you're just trying to be friendly or courteous, respond with the stock greeting. Anything else sounds like you're trying to start a conversation or make a point.
Dec
24
answered Is there a single word for “towards the equator”?
Dec
24
answered A good response to holiday greeting from professor?