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Jan
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
28
comment Difference between “per” and “a”
@FumbleFingers Yeah, it was a while ago. The question just showed up with a new comment or a vote or something.
Dec
27
comment Difference between “per” and “a”
@BrettReynolds Hmm, but in "I'm going this week", "this week" acts as an adverb saying when you are going. But in "goes three times a week", I don't see any relationship established between "a week" and either "goes" or "three times".
Dec
27
comment Difference between “per” and “a”
@FumbleFingers Headlines and titles are not generally the best models for good grammar.
Dec
25
comment What do you call a person who refuses to do something/certain things?
@einpoklum The point I was trying to make was that, to the best of my knowledge, there is no general word in English for "someone who refuses to do something", where the word would apply no matter what the thing they are refusing to do is and no matter their reasons. I was attempting to be somewhat whimsical in giving examples of what you might call someone who refused to do certain specific things for specific reasons. Yes, none of the words I used are specifically related to refusing in general, they are all reasons for refusing to do a specific thing.
Dec
24
answered What do you call a person who refuses to do something/certain things?
Dec
24
comment N.B. (Nota Bene) vs P.S. (Post Script)
@AlanK Could be. I can only say that I do not recall ever seeing it used, and I think I'm pretty well educated and well read. Maybe I've seen it now and then and glossed over it. I work in the computer business too so if it was common in that industry but not elsewhere, I'd be among the first to know it. I'm not saying you're wrong, just that I can't corroborate your statement.
Dec
24
comment A good response to holiday greeting from professor?
I think you're trying too hard. It's very common in English to give casual greetings and response, "Have a nice day." "You, too" Etc. Yes, you CAN be more creative. But such greetings are pretty much stock formulas. If you're just trying to be friendly or courteous, respond with the stock greeting. Anything else sounds like you're trying to start a conversation or make a point.
Dec
24
answered Is there a single word for “towards the equator”?
Dec
24
answered A good response to holiday greeting from professor?
Dec
24
comment what is a “Tragic missed opportunity”?
That should be, "Had the Tsar pulled this off ..." Only one "had", not two. I don't know if that error is in the original or if the poster made a mistake copying it.
Dec
24
answered what is a “Tragic missed opportunity”?
Dec
24
answered Is the semicolon used properly?
Dec
24
answered N.B. (Nota Bene) vs P.S. (Post Script)
Dec
15
comment What is the meaning of “did time”?
@deadrat Agreed, though the "heart" part is puzzling. If he was speaking of literally being imprisoned in Siberia, he'd simply say, "I did time in Siberia." References to the heart usually refer to love and romance. Maybe saying his/her lover has captured his heart like a prisoner in Siberia? Weird analogy, but possible. As you say, we'd need more context to make sense of this.
Dec
14
comment What is less harsh than “brainwashing”?
@sgroves Well, I've consulted several dictionaries, and I don't see any that give a definition of "institutionalize" that sounds anything like brainwashing or convincing a person of anything. Nor do I recall ever having heard the word used with such a meaning. If you can quote a dictionary giving such a definition, or give some other reference, I'm happy to hear it. As with many words, it's certainly possible that some profession or region uses the word with a different definition than others. (If no one gives new information on this, I'll consider that we've both said our piece and drop it.)
Dec
10
comment What is less harsh than “brainwashing”?
... "We are trying to institutionalize people into our beliefs". When the word is used with that definition, it's the idea that is institutionalized, not the people.
Dec
10
comment What is less harsh than “brainwashing”?
@danielf The definition you quote brings to mind another usage that perhaps is what Ottodidakt was thinking of: People sometimes say, "We are trying to institutionalize this process", meaning, "we are trying to make this process become an established institution. I've always heard that used to discuss a business process or something of the sort, like, "We are trying to institutionalize cost-benefit analysis." Perhaps some use it for more ideological things, like "We are trying to institutionalize racial tolerance". I don't recall hearing that, but I can comprehend it. But I've never heard ...
Dec
10
comment What is less harsh than “brainwashing”?
@talmu "The soldier was institutionalized in the army", meaning "got so used to the army he couldn't function outside"? I don't recall ever having heard the word used that way, and I don't see that in any dictionary. Of course I can't say that no person or group uses it that way, but if so, I'd think that must be some specialized or regional usage.
Dec
9
answered What is less harsh than “brainwashing”?