2,774 reputation
1126
bio website about.me/cesargon
location Galicia, Spain
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Aug 18 at 20:24

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, cultural heritage, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Apr
14
comment Looking for a Verb / Idiom to Make a Wish Come True
Indeed you can!
Apr
11
comment Reciprocal of “conformant”
@JohnLawler: Are you saying that, in my example, if the processes are conformant to the standard, then the standard is accordant to the processes? That sounds more like a synonym to me, rather than an opposite relationship. Your second option sounds better though. Am I missing something?
Apr
11
comment Reciprocal of “conformant”
Thanks, this is not bad.
Apr
11
comment Reciprocal of “conformant”
No, I am not looking for a synonym but for a complementary word. I understand that "reciprocal" means precisely that; see e.g. merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reciprocal
Dec
2
comment What English words employ the Spanish suffix '-ista'?
In some of the words in the list, "-ista" does not work as a suffix, e.g. "autopista", "vista" (and derivatives).
Sep
30
comment A phrase for “Actions to do”
You didn't mention code before. You may want to clarify the scope and context of your question, perhaps.
Sep
8
comment When did “text” come to be defined as something other than words?
@TimLymington: Indeed. That's my point.
Sep
8
comment When did “text” come to be defined as something other than words?
Postmodern authors often talk about "reading" almost anything. And you can definitely "read" someone's face or body language. If we accept metaphors, there's no limit.
Jul
11
comment User’s Guide vs Users’ Guide
-1 The guide belongs to the user/users in the second example, but it doesn't belong to the installation in the first. Your reasoning is thus flawed.
May
14
comment “Infer” vs. “imply” — can “infer” imply “imply”?
@KyleStrand: That's fair enough. ;-)
May
14
comment “Infer” vs. “imply” — can “infer” imply “imply”?
@KyleStrand: I agree that natural languages are moving targets that change continuously and therefore cannot be completely determined by rules (your words). But between this and never having been subject to any codified set of rules (again your words) there is a huge distance. Spanish and French, to use my examples, are both subject to many codified rules and still not completely determined by them.
May
14
comment “Infer” vs. “imply” — can “infer” imply “imply”?
You say natural languages are not and have never been subject to any codified set of rules. Some are, such as Spanish or French. Descriptivism is big in the anglosphere, but not that big outside it.
Feb
5
comment “Most” vs. “most of”
What about mass nouns? They surely behave differently to countable nouns.
Feb
3
comment What is the synonym/antonym for “feminist”/“feminism”?
+1, and +10 if I could. This is the only answer that makes sense here.
Jan
19
comment What's the difference between 'just' and 'fair'?
This is a great answer. Others say similar things, but this summarises the gist of the difference into a couple of simple and clear phrases. Thanks!
Jan
12
comment A word for non-language sound
It would be quite harsh on John Williams to say that "Duel of the Fates" is noise, don't you think?
Jan
12
comment A word for non-language sound
@Jim: Fair enough; answer edited.
Dec
17
comment Is corrosion an onomatopoeia?
The toothed, scraping device that some molluscs use for feeding is called a radula (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radula). It comes from Latin radere "to scrape" according to Etymonline.
Dec
17
comment A single word for an inanimate object that is very old and held in high esteem
@J.R.: I agree; I didn't downvote the answer because I am aware of that. Just making a point since the OP wants a single word.
Dec
17
comment A single word for an inanimate object that is very old and held in high esteem
A landmark doesn't need to be very old, as required by the OP. It only needs to be notorious.