2,788 reputation
1227
bio website about.me/cesargon
location Galicia, Spain
age 47
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Nov 30 at 11:34

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, cultural heritage, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Jan
19
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
18
asked What's the difference between 'just' and 'fair'?
Jan
12
comment A word for non-language sound
It would be quite harsh on John Williams to say that "Duel of the Fates" is noise, don't you think?
Jan
12
comment A word for non-language sound
@Jim: Fair enough; answer edited.
Jan
12
revised A word for non-language sound
added 139 characters in body
Jan
11
answered A word for non-language sound
Dec
27
awarded  Necromancer
Dec
17
comment Is corrosion an onomatopoeia?
The toothed, scraping device that some molluscs use for feeding is called a radula (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radula). It comes from Latin radere "to scrape" according to Etymonline.
Dec
17
comment A single word for an inanimate object that is very old and held in high esteem
@J.R.: I agree; I didn't downvote the answer because I am aware of that. Just making a point since the OP wants a single word.
Dec
17
comment A single word for an inanimate object that is very old and held in high esteem
A landmark doesn't need to be very old, as required by the OP. It only needs to be notorious.
Dec
8
answered Word for people easily influenced by propaganda
Dec
5
comment Do you “watch” a movie or “see” a movie?
@Noldorin: Fair enough ;-)
Dec
4
comment Do you “watch” a movie or “see” a movie?
@Noldorin: I am not sure what you mean when you say that French/Spanish use the "to see" verb. What specific French/Spanish are you talking about? In Spain we only use "ver" (which translates as "to see") for movies.
Nov
23
comment Capital letters in headlines
@tchrist: I agree with you; I was also surprised to see that Wikipedia focusses so much on US as opposed to UK publishers. I publish frequently with UK houses and title casing is very common. Still, my point still holds: it's for emphasis.
Nov
23
answered Capital letters in headlines
Nov
21
answered What's the opposite of 'dense'
Oct
24
comment Is it correct to say “What was your name?”?
@Kramii: That only happens in some cultures. In others, you don't change your name just because you get married.
Oct
24
answered Alternative names for a place of trade
Oct
20
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Oct
2
answered Is there an equivalent of 'onomatopoeia' for words inspired by the appearance of thing?