2,729 reputation
1024
bio website verdewek.com/work
location Galicia, Spain
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 3 hours ago

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have extensive experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Jan
14
comment Professors and Students
@Stephen: Exactly, regardless of their position.
Jan
14
comment Professors and Students
@Stephen: That contradicts my experience. Doctor is a status you have achieved through your qualifications: if you hold a PhD, then you're a doctor. Professor, on the other hand, applies to those that hold a certain position at a teaching institution. I have a PhD but I am unemployed, so I am still a doctor but not a professor. Once I get a job at university, I will become a professor. In other words, professor is an office rather than a title.
Jan
10
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
+1 Oh, I didn't know that; thanks for explaining. To me, and to most Spaniards in general, "sausage" is in general translated as "salchicha", i.e. the thing you put in your hot dogs, which is barely related to chorizo or other cold meats.
Jan
10
comment What does “fine-grained” mean?
@John: +1 for "coarse grain".
Jan
10
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
I must say that "chorizo" is not Spanish for "sausage". "Chorizo" is a very specific kind of sausage, and there are other kinds, such as "salchichón", "lomo embuchado", "morcón", etc. So the expression "chorizo sausage" makes perfect sense in English, because "chorizo" qualifies the more generic "sausage".
Jan
10
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
+1 @Andrew: Indeed.
Jan
7
comment How to name a routine interruption in the work of some system that is deliberately done in order to find some possible weak points in the system?
@Shiny: I know, I know. ;-)
Jan
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
4
comment “More perfect” versus “less imperfect”
@nohat: +1 Thanks for your understanding.
Jan
4
comment Is there a name for the emotional response to cuteness?
Sorry to be pedantic, but cromulent is not comparable. ;-)
Jan
4
revised Is “yesterday” a noun?
added 9 characters in body
Jan
3
answered Is there a name for the emotional response to cuteness?
Jan
3
comment Word for referring to the arts of the carpenter
Spanish for "carpentry" is "carpintería", not "carpenteria". :-)
Jan
3
comment Favourite untranslatables
I imagine many languages make that distinction. At least, Spanish, Galician, Italian and French do.
Jan
3
revised Favourite untranslatables
deleted 5 characters in body
Jan
3
comment How do I pronounce Gaudí, the architect?
@cindi: "Pau" is pronounced like the first syllable in "Gaudi".
Jan
3
answered Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
Jan
3
comment When is it appropriate to use the original pronunciation of a foreign word versus the English pronunciation?
I am a native Spanish speaker and my experience is that in Latin America and Portugal they will often give you the condescending look if you dumb things down when you pronounce. However, in Spain you are expected to dumb it down.
Jan
3
awarded  Critic
Jan
3
comment How to name a routine interruption in the work of some system that is deliberately done in order to find some possible weak points in the system?
Testing is not something that should interrupt normal operation of a system.