H Stephen Straight

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721 reputation
47
bio website
location Binghamton, NY
age 70
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Apr 15 at 19:33

Mar
18
answered Why do we say “Present Arms” instead of “Present Your Arms”?
Mar
11
comment Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
My mother and some of the other members of her family typically referred to themselves and other lapsed members of their ancestral faith as "fallen-away Catholics."
Mar
8
awarded  Yearling
Feb
25
answered When did we stop translating proper names?
Feb
25
comment When did we stop translating proper names?
The examples of Juan Carlos for John Charles and the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire for Ivory Coast seem quite different to me. The first, as far as I know, is not caused by a request from the King of Spain or anyone else that he not be given an anglicized name, while the second is specifically caused by just such a request from the government of the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire.
Feb
19
comment Which definition of “atheism” is the proper usage?
This answer requires citations of sources in which these claims are substantiated.
Feb
11
comment Difference between nevertheless and nonetheless
To put Jim's point slightly differently, nonetheless means 'not the slightest bit less' while nevertheless means 'despite that'.
Dec
17
comment Why does the Sudan have a “the” in the name?
Another hitherto unmentioned example is the Yucatan versus Yucatan, the first to refer to the peninsula in which the Mexican state of Yucatan is located. Cancun is in the Yucatan but in the state of Quintana Roo.
Oct
22
comment Is there a word meaning “my child's spouse's parents”?
If your child has children, "co-grandparents" will do.
Oct
22
comment “physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”
Issues of stress are strictly secondary. The key is that "not very attractive physically" immediately implies that she was attractive in some other way.
Oct
16
comment “Cooking” is to “culinary” as “dining” is to what?
I use the word gastronomic at the end of every meal: 'Gastronomic satiety admonishes me that I have arrived at a state of deglutition consistent with dietetic integrity.'
Oct
2
answered Single term for “elephants going berserk”
Aug
13
comment Is there English version of French army cliché, “A friend when you’re lieutenant, companion when captain, … the enemy when you’re general"?
@mplungjan. The quote, often attributed to Sun-tzu or to Machiavelli, appears to originate in Godfather II, where Michael Corleone says it is something taught to him by his father Vito. Besides, it is in many ways the opposite of the French saying, which implies that you are likely to be farthest away from your fiercest competitors, which produces vulnerabilities Don Corleone's advice seeks to avoid.
Aug
13
revised A word that describes something that has been given a name
added 368 characters in body
Aug
13
comment A word that describes something that has been given a name
In light of the OP's clarification of the question, this answer won't do.
Aug
13
answered A word that describes something that has been given a name
Jul
9
comment May you please explain this?
@JohnLawler and others: I love the term "zombie rule", but a more polite way to refer to what's going on here is hypercorrection. Having been taught that "Can I go now?" must be rephrased as "May I please go now?", this girl concludes that "Can you pass the salt? should be "May you please ..." It's the same phenomenon as "Me and him are going" being judged inferior to "He and I are going", leading many to conclude that "This is between me and him" should be replaced by "This is between he and I."
Jun
4
comment Are there any names of food that are associated with political correctness other than Fried chicken?
But are these politically incorrect? I wouldn't take offense at being called a hamburger-eating American. Do Syrians take offense at being called falafel eaters?
May
14
comment What kind of noun is a picture?
John Lawler's answer lives up to his usual standard. Well done! But he failed to mention that not only possessive pronouns but also possessive phrases of any kind can occur with Picture Nouns. Examples: the baby's picture, the garden's depiction, Washington's portrait, my grandfather's life narrative.
Apr
30
comment Bringing word into existence just by calling and using it
This question might imply a belief that only certain authorities or institutions can bring a new word "into existence", after which it becomes useable. The truth is the opposite: Only usage, initiated by a sometimes unsung coiner, can create a new word; commentators, scholars, and dictionaries merely respond to these usages, whether approvingly or not, and they survive, or not, only as a result of continued usage, or not.