H Stephen Straight

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H. Stephen (“Steve”) Straight

​​Steve is professor emeritus of anthropology and ​ ​​of ​linguistics and Fulbright Program Adviser at Binghamton University, State University of New York. He is the founding director of Binghamton’s award-winning Languages Across the Curriculum (LxC) program​ and in the 1990s led or participated in grant-supported projects that gave rise to the nationwide Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) Consortium. Steve’s career has included selection as a Fulbright-Hays lecturer at the University of Bucharest, a Mellon fellow at the National Foreign Language Center, and a visiting senior associate in the Center for Institutional and International Initiatives at the ​ ​American Council on Education (ACE). In the ​early ​2000s, he served as Binghamton’s first vice provost for undergraduate education and international affairs and oversaw numerous international initiatives, including a​ campus-wide curricular requirement entitled Creating a Global Vision, dual-diploma partnerships with universities in Turkey, and a Global Studies minor requiring study abroad with intensive pre-departure, in-country, and re-entry learning activities. Steve’s​ experience includes assignments as grant consultant or external reviewer, and leadership positions in ​the Linguistic Association of Canada and the United States (LACUS) and the Association of International Education Administrators (AIEA). Areas of expertise: Languages across the curriculum; Campus internationalization; International program development; Dual degree programs; Inter-institutional partnerships; Grant writing. ​ [For more information, including a comprehensive curriculum vitae ​, please see ​ http://www2.binghamton.edu/anthropology/people/faculty/h-stephen-straight.html]


Aug
12
revised Difference between “résumé” and “CV”
deleted 2 characters in body
Aug
12
answered Difference between “résumé” and “CV”
Aug
12
comment What is the “‑cide” word for killing one’s husband?
In ethnographic jargon, when a married couple lives with the wife's family their residence is called uxorilocal, but when with the husband's family virilocal. So, uxorilocal:virilocal::uxoricide:viricide. This is the best choice by far.
Jul
16
comment Jones's or Jones'?
Pronunciation is indeed the key: Dialects differ even though the "grammar" of this issue strongly favors the inclusion (and pronunciation) of the possessive s on any singular noun, whether it ends in s (or z) or not. So: "Jones's" and "Horowitz's" but "the Joneses' house" and "the Horowitzes' house" (because they already have the fricative plural ending--which is not the case for "children's" or "mice's", where the s possessive is added to a plural noun). (Some dialects even leave off the plural suffix on nouns that end in s, so that "the Horowitzes' house" becomes "the Horowitz' house".)
Jul
16
comment Jones's or Jones'?
No! It's "my Achilles heel", but "Achilles's heel was his secret weakness", just as it's "his Martin Luther King determination", but "Martin Luther King's determination was phenomenal".
Jul
15
revised Is there a word for a comment which makes no sense or adds nothing to the current discussion?
added 204 characters in body
Jul
15
revised Is there a word for a comment which makes no sense or adds nothing to the current discussion?
added 204 characters in body
Jul
15
answered Is there a word for a comment which makes no sense or adds nothing to the current discussion?
Jul
8
comment Why do we say “Present Arms” instead of “Present Your Arms”?
For the reasons I've given, the military examples hold no special status over the myriad of examples I have alluded to.
Jul
8
comment Is there a polite way of saying “people like you”?
Your ilk = negative, people like you = neutral unless put in a negative context or delivered in a negative tone of voice.
Jun
25
comment “When I was in college…” Do you really mean college? Or university?
At U.S. research universities TA means teaching assistant, who is almost always a master's or doctoral level student. A "UTA" or undergraduate TA is a (usually third or fourth year) student in a (4-year) bachelor's degree program.
Jun
18
awarded  Revival
May
20
comment antonym of “spoiled”
What a wonderfully simple answer!
Mar
18
answered Why do we say “Present Arms” instead of “Present Your Arms”?
Mar
11
comment Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
My mother and some of the other members of her family typically referred to themselves and other lapsed members of their ancestral faith as "fallen-away Catholics."
Mar
8
awarded  Yearling
Feb
25
answered When did we stop translating proper names?
Feb
25
comment When did we stop translating proper names?
The examples of Juan Carlos for John Charles and the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire for Ivory Coast seem quite different to me. The first, as far as I know, is not caused by a request from the King of Spain or anyone else that he not be given an anglicized name, while the second is specifically caused by just such a request from the government of the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire.
Feb
19
comment Which definition of “atheism” is the proper usage?
This answer requires citations of sources in which these claims are substantiated.
Feb
11
comment Difference between nevertheless and nonetheless
To put Jim's point slightly differently, nonetheless means 'not the slightest bit less' while nevertheless means 'despite that'.