Reputation
944
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
5 12
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~62k people reached

Jul
14
comment Word for “animals, including humans”?
In order to include spirits, and on the assumption that all of the beings you might encounter in the fantasy world your building, perhaps you want to use the label "sentient beings".
Jul
13
comment What English word has the most consecutive consonants?
@JanusBahsJacquet Thank you for helping me apply the (to me previously opaque) fortis/lenis distinction. I accept your transcription in full, but I still believe that a voiceless [g], no matter how lenis, will stick out for many if not all listeners as an epenthetic /k/, just as the lenis [p] in the pronunciation of the word pumkin gave rise to the respelling of the word.
Jul
11
comment What English word has the most consecutive consonants?
@JanusBahsJacquet Your use of IPA differs from mine, it seems. I take voiceless [g] to be [k], even in the narrowest of transcriptions. Also, I use tie bars to indicate that the tied symbols constitute a single phone even in the narrowest of transcriptions, the best examples being affricates. More significantly, perhaps, I have always seen the [k] in this word as a synchronic example of epenthesis, in this case resulting in what sounds like a /k/ inserted between [ŋ] and [θ]. Of course, the [k] is not phonemic in this case, but a novice phonemic transcriber might easily mistake it for such.
Jul
8
comment What English word has the most consecutive consonants?
@JanusBahsJacquet Phonemic consonants, maybe not (if [ŋ] is not phonemically /ng/), but phonetic consonants, definitely yes, in every pronunciation of these words I have ever heard that contains [ŋ] (as opposed to [n]).
May
20
comment What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
Better than "sitting" would be "dead": "After my accomplice told all, I was a dead duck."
May
6
comment Shortest complete sentence in English
This is by far the best answer, especially when the number of one-syllable, one-word answers keeps growing.
May
5
comment What's a good word for 'clear mindedness' and 'an ability to see something as a whole'?
With faint echoes of @JohnLawler, I would say that "savvy" has effectively replaced "common sense" now that nonsense has become so common.
May
5
answered Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?
May
5
comment Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?
The troubles with this otherwise very good answer are that (1) not all wealthy people set up trust funds for their wastrel children (think Warren Buffett) and (2) not all trust-fund beneficiaries engage in wasteful, self-indulgent, indolent behavior (think Nelson Rockefeller).
Apr
23
comment Difference between nevertheless and nonetheless
@JanusBahsJacquet Point well taken. I concede.
Apr
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
7
comment What is a word in English that means “able to learn new things quickly”?
"Quick study" would refer to a person who readily acquires both skills and knowledge, but with a clear inclusion of becoming knowledgeable as well as skillful.
Mar
28
awarded  Custodian
Mar
28
reviewed No Action Needed “In month year” versus “In year month”
Mar
24
answered Is “women men girls love meet die” a valid sentence?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed “The answer[s] to big problems…” - plural or singular?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed how can Use the title 'Mr'
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Offroad, off road, or off-road?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Be held Vs To be held
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Using “spec” abbreviation