907 reputation
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bio website binghamton.edu/anthropology/…
location Binghamton, New York
age 71
visits member for 4 years
seen 2 days ago

H. Stephen (“Steve”) Straight

​​Steve is professor emeritus of anthropology and ​of ​linguistics and Fulbright Program Adviser at Binghamton University, State University of New York. He is the founding director of Binghamton’s award-winning Languages Across the Curriculum (LxC) program​ and in the 1990s led or participated in grant-supported projects that gave rise to the nationwide Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) Consortium. Steve’s career has included selection as a Fulbright-Hays lecturer at the University of Bucharest, a Mellon fellow at the National Foreign Language Center, and a visiting senior associate in the Center for Institutional and International Initiatives at the ​American Council on Education (ACE). In the ​early ​2000s, he served as Binghamton’s first vice provost for undergraduate education and international affairs and oversaw numerous international initiatives, including a​ campus-wide curricular requirement entitled Creating a Global Vision, dual-diploma partnerships with universities in Turkey, and a Global Studies minor requiring study abroad with intensive pre-departure, in-country, and re-entry learning activities. Steve’s​ experience includes assignments as grant consultant or external reviewer, and leadership positions in ​the Linguistic Association of Canada and the United States (LACUS) and the Association of International Education Administrators (AIEA). Areas of expertise: Languages across the curriculum; Campus internationalization; International program development; Dual degree programs; Inter-institutional partnerships; Grant writing. ​ [For more information, including a comprehensive curriculum vitae, please see ​http://www.binghamton.edu/anthropology/people/faculty/h-stephen-straight.html]


2d
awarded  Custodian
2d
reviewed No Action Needed “In month year” versus “In year month”
Mar
24
answered Is “women men girls love meet die” a valid sentence?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed “The answer[s] to big problems…” - plural or singular?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed how can Use the title 'Mr'
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Offroad, off road, or off-road?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Be held Vs To be held
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Using “spec” abbreviation
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed How do I change passive voice to active?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed How do I punctuate this sentence? A stamp cost three cents a gallon of gas twenty
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed An adjective for someone who doesn't really care about me
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Can I say : “He was made broke”?
Mar
18
answered Hyphenation of a multiple adverb-past participle phrase
Mar
10
comment “Too much pills and liquor” or “Too many pills and liquor”?
I counted eleven errors in this answer, some bearing on the question itself and others revealing an apparent absence of knowledge of both grammar in general and English in particular.
Mar
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
10
comment Kids addressing older people
Following up on Tim S.'s comment, if you are trying to translate this story into a culture different from the story's original culture you will need to worry about a lot more than differences in terms of address. As he says, to retain its original "flavor" you'll need to provide clues such as "tia" to prepare the reader for other less linguistic cultural difference, while to adapt it to a new culture you may need to alter many parts of the story to confirm or challenge the patterns of belief and behavior of that culture.
Dec
10
comment Why can I use 'guys' in the plural but not in the singular vocatively
FWIW, I've always thought that the vocative use of "guys" was actually a contraction of "you guys", i.e. the otherwise missing second person plural subjective pronoun. By this analysis tacking on a vocative to "What (kind of beer) have you got?" rightly sounds strange.
Dec
9
comment The Equivalent Term for Pharmacy in the UK
In sum: "Chemist", the British term for pharmacist, or its possessed form "chemist's", applies in popular (if not in corporate branding) usage to the entire shop, much of which contains goods irrelevant to health care, while in the U.S. "drugstore" has this broader denotation. In both contexts, however, the term "pharmacy" refers quite narrowly to the chemist's/pharmacist's specialized domain. This explains the otherwise paradoxical sign on the door of my local CVS Pharmacy listing different hours of operation for the "Pharmacy" (where prescriptions are filled) and the (rest of) the "Store".
Oct
21
revised What is the correct shortened form for “Goals of the Theses”
Corrected spelling and clarified intent
Oct
21
suggested approved edit on What is the correct shortened form for “Goals of the Theses”