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Apr
23
comment Difference between nevertheless and nonetheless
@JanusBahsJacquet Point well taken. I concede.
Apr
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
7
comment What is a word in English that means “able to learn new things quickly”?
"Quick study" would refer to a person who readily acquires both skills and knowledge, but with a clear inclusion of becoming knowledgeable as well as skillful.
Mar
28
awarded  Custodian
Mar
28
reviewed No Action Needed “In month year” versus “In year month”
Mar
24
answered Is “women men girls love meet die” a valid sentence?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed “The answer[s] to big problems…” - plural or singular?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed how can Use the title 'Mr'
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Offroad, off road, or off-road?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Be held Vs To be held
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Using “spec” abbreviation
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed How do I change passive voice to active?
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed How do I punctuate this sentence? A stamp cost three cents a gallon of gas twenty
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed An adjective for someone who doesn't really care about me
Mar
18
reviewed No Action Needed Can I say : “He was made broke”?
Mar
18
answered Hyphenation of a multiple adverb-past participle phrase
Mar
10
comment “Too much pills and liquor” or “Too many pills and liquor”?
I counted eleven errors in this answer, some bearing on the question itself and others revealing an apparent absence of knowledge of both grammar in general and English in particular.
Mar
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
10
comment Kids addressing older people
Following up on Tim S.'s comment, if you are trying to translate this story into a culture different from the story's original culture you will need to worry about a lot more than differences in terms of address. As he says, to retain its original "flavor" you'll need to provide clues such as "tia" to prepare the reader for other less linguistic cultural difference, while to adapt it to a new culture you may need to alter many parts of the story to confirm or challenge the patterns of belief and behavior of that culture.
Dec
10
comment Why can I use 'guys' in the plural but not in the singular vocatively
FWIW, I've always thought that the vocative use of "guys" was actually a contraction of "you guys", i.e. the otherwise missing second person plural subjective pronoun. By this analysis tacking on a vocative to "What (kind of beer) have you got?" rightly sounds strange.