105,776 reputation
8139239
bio website caxton1485.wordpress.com
location United Kingdom
age 72
visits member for 3 years
seen 9 hours ago

I have spent most of my career in government service, much of it abroad. I have a degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Oxford and the Diploma in English Language Studies from the UK's Open University, and am qualified as a teacher of English to foreign learners. I have studied several other languages including French, German, Latin, Arabic and Old and Middle English.

My blog, Caxton, is mostly, but not entirely, about the English language.

Elsewhere on the web I have attempted to write in the constrained style of the 'Ouvroir de littérature potentielle' (OULIPO) in Variations on an Incident in Paris and in Variations on Jane Austen. I have also created a full set of 256 Syllogisms by figure and mood and showing which are valid and which are not.


Sep
13
awarded  Nice Answer
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13
awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Necromancer
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awarded  phrases
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awarded  Necromancer
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awarded  Nice Answer
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awarded  Enlightened
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awarded  Nice Answer
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awarded  Enlightened
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awarded  Nice Answer
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awarded  Enlightened
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awarded  Nice Answer
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awarded  Good Answer
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awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
25
comment Is it “a user” or “an user”
‘Vowel’ and ‘consonant’ describe letters that represent vowel and consonant sounds, but they also describe the sounds themselves. A vowel is a sound made from the throat without interruption by the other vocal organs. A consonant is a sound blocked or restricted by audible friction. The initial sound of ‘user’, /j/, is interrupted by the position of the soft palate and the tongue. It is convenient to group it with the other consonants, but, because its place and manner of articulation are a little different from them, it is also known as a semi-vowel.
Aug
22
comment “do the dishes” vs “wash the dishes”
It depends on who you live with.
Aug
19
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
19
comment “I was going to be called Kate if I was a girl”
The unsophisticated dialect is British English.
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1
awarded  Nice Answer
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23
awarded  Enlightened