442 reputation
58
bio website
location Delft, Netherlands
age 30
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Nov 8 at 17:37

Language enthusiast, though I don't have a degree of any sort. Planning on studying linguistics once I am allowed to attend university in the Netherlands. I'm a native speaker of American English. I'm fairly fluent in conversational Dutch and have acquired my 2nd level proficiency diploma (Staatsexamen II). I studied 6 and 7 years of Spanish and French, respectively, but my proficiency level has dropped due to disuse. I also think constructed languages are fascinating. :)


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
16
awarded  Yearling
Oct
27
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
17
awarded  Yearling
Aug
28
awarded  Critic
Aug
20
awarded  Scholar
Aug
20
accepted Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
Aug
20
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
@Brian I've not personally heard this one either, but in googling, everything it's related to implies that the person is doing something unnecessary. While I pondered "selling ice to an Eskimo," the connotation for that phrase is stronger with sales than with a futile activity.
Aug
16
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
15
awarded  Outspoken
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
The implication of "pissing into the wind" also includes that you're doing something that will have negative consequences for yourself. This isn't quite the same.
Aug
15
awarded  Good Question
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
@JPmiaou Hm, perhaps. I grew up in central NYS and never heard it there.
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
@JSBŠĺ∂ngs I was waffling over your statement, but I find myself agreeing with it more, though it's also often used more as a commendation on what someone said as already agreeing with what he or she believes. I'm not sure if that's quite the same. I think you may be right though in that it's probably the closest answer. I'll wait a bit longer to accept though to see if there are any other suggestions.
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
I found that phrase as well, but like you, I'd never heard it before and wouldn't have immediately understood the implication.
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
While that is a very fun phrase, it's usually referred to imply the difficulty of a given activity rather than its fruitlessness. Neither carrying water to the sea nor coals to Newcastle are necessarily difficult, but they are both futile activities.
Aug
15
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
I agree with T.E.D.'s statements that most of these have a specific implication. "Locking the stable door after the horse has bolted" implies that an action was taken too late rather than being pointless in its entirety.
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
"Beating a dead horse" has more of the connotation of doing something long after it's useless though, implying that at one time, there was still a point to doing it. Both "water naar de zee dragen" and "carrying coals to Newcastle" are already outright pointless.
Aug
15
awarded  Student