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Jan
18
comment Are there any “fake” French words used in English?
@tom As a French native and considering as well the authoritative link I've pointed too I can assure you this is absolutely not an issue. In France (I wouldn't know about Quebec or other French speaking areas) it is just slightly old-fashioned.
Jan
17
comment Are there any “fake” French words used in English?
@MatthewLeingang Uses of the word cul-de sac in French are recorded long before the Old Continent decided to set foot across the Pond! See the TLF, etymology and uses. Nowadays French people prefer voie sans issue to cul-de-sac and this might be a consequence of voie sans issue being the term used by the highway code. An ngram shows the decline of the use of the word in French in the 20th century. Too long to include the result of an ngram in a comment but anyone interested can run it themselves.
Sep
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
22
comment Is “mother tongue” exactly the same as “native language”?
@Mari-LouA And I agree with you if anyone are to blame it is those long standing users who approved an edit that changed the meaning of the answer.
Sep
22
comment Is “mother tongue” exactly the same as “native language”?
@Mari-LouA: the edit was about reverting "from birth" to "as a child" which changed the entire meaning - and which I consider as false in the context of my answer. Babies and children are entirely different entities. We learn one language from birth (and that starts in the mother's womb, we know babies hear sounds in the womb that begin to shape their sense of language), as children we can learn lots of languages, it is an entirely different process of learning.
Sep
22
comment Is “mother tongue” exactly the same as “native language”?
An edit changing the meaning of my answer had been made by community. I reverted to my original answer and if anyone disagrees they should do it in a comment and we can discuss as civilised people.
Sep
22
revised Is “mother tongue” exactly the same as “native language”?
edited body
Sep
12
awarded  Yearling
Jul
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
3
awarded  Notable Question
May
19
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
18
comment Pronunciation Feedback Required
I'd say [wiːks] and not [wiks]
Feb
8
comment What is a “Select Committee” in the context of an 1833 English report?
Putting child labour & 1833 together it seems you are referring to British MP M.T Sadler's select committee. In this case I would go for whatever translation(s) have been used (or are used) in history books. Comité parlementaire is often used for it, it is used also in the translation of Engel's La situation de la classe laborieuse en Angleterre. But it is usually referred to as le comité Sadler" just as it is known in English as "Sadler’s Committee". In any case do not use *Commission d'Enquête Parlementaire which would be an anachronism and out of place in Britain.
Jan
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
2
comment words derived from French that have re-entered French from English
There's a list (work in progress) of them on French Language: french.stackexchange.com/a/8285/358
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
24
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
22
reviewed Reject What does “I got a bee up my ass about you two” mean?
Sep
20
revised About the phrase “ pick someone brain”
missing apostrophe