1,192 reputation
48
bio website bl.uk
location United Kingdom
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Apr 10 at 7:57

Software developer, with over 20 years' experience of Unix and Windows, but who would honestly rather have his head in a book most of the time.


Apr
18
comment Un-(adjective) but In-(noun) — does it ever go the other way?
@JohnLawler I'd consider your two comments a satisfactory answer - that it's about the origin of the word rather than its role in a sentence, the difference between Latin and Germanic words.
Apr
17
comment why “and then some” means considerably more?
Broadly I agree, but in the context in which I've usually seen this phrase used, it tends to mean noticeably more, so I generally consider it understatement.
Apr
17
comment “Off on a tangent” vs. “off tangent.”
That may be it, @AmigableClarkKant. If I hear (or read) "off tangent" I immediately think "But a tangent is a line away ... perpendicular ... radius .. thingy" (I half-remember it). So is "off-tangent" a movement back towards the circle, getting back on track, or a move even further away from it?
Apr
17
comment “his” may be more suitable but why is “him” not ok ?
Why was this answer downvoted? I've never heard an English-speaker say "NOUN PHRASE... of him" in this way. It might be a stretch to call it grammatically incorrect (though his/hers are at least possessive pronouns and him/her are not), but "A friend of me/him/her" is certainly not idiomatic in any English-speaking area where I've been.
Apr
16
answered why “and then some” means considerably more?
Jan
28
comment What is wrong with the word “performant”?
Yes, that's exactly it. I know in French it means "first", but to justify that word it would really have to be first, chronologically or by some other ranking. Using the French word instead allows the weaselly suggestion of superiority without needing any supporting evidence.
Oct
5
awarded  Critic
Aug
6
awarded  Yearling
Jul
18
answered “Mostest” vs. “most”
Feb
1
comment Were “devil” and “damned” really offensive words in Victorian times?
That second quote is from the preface in my edition written by Charlotte Brontë, who explains some of the background to the book's completion and publication.
Nov
4
comment Legos not LEGO?
Yes. Some in the UK might go to the trouble of saying "Lego bricks", but most would treat it as an uncountable noun and call it "Lego"; never "Legos".
Nov
4
revised Is it correct to say: “I would do something, be it me”?
added 286 characters in body
Nov
4
answered Is it correct to say: “I would do something, be it me”?
Aug
23
answered What is wrong with the word “performant”?
Aug
7
awarded  Yearling
Jul
15
comment Which one is more British: “car hire” or “rent a car”?
For the service: "car hire" or perhaps "car rental"; for the car: "hire car".
Jul
13
comment Why is the unit of measure placed before the value for currencies? Are there other measures where the unit precedes value?
In photography, light sensitivity measured in the ISO (ASA) system has the "unit" ISO placed before the numerals (ISO 100, ISO 800, etc), so it's not exclusive to currency.
Jul
8
answered “Never mind” in AmE and BrE
Jul
8
comment Should 'I' be capitalized or in lower case?
Meh. It's no more illogical than I is normally capitalized, but fair enough. I can't be bothered arguing.
Jul
7
comment Should 'I' be capitalized or in lower case?
Think of I as a proper noun, like someone's name. For this reason, it should be capitalized.