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seen Nov 6 '12 at 12:03

Dec
12
awarded  Commentator
Dec
12
comment Asks a question; never responds to answers/comments
I don't think it's possible to answer this question without knowing the questioner's motivation. They could have become bored, distracted, arrested, or even killed and each case would be described differently.
Dec
7
comment “Grit” vs “gritted”
This usage of grit in the past tense is definitely US only. To my ear it sounds as weird as "writing someone" as opposed to "writing to someone".
Nov
16
comment Is there a word for telling the truth (technically) in order to misguide?
@EdStaub Yes, I agree to some extent. I also think that "deception" is the end result of the behaviour described in the question rather than the question itself.
Nov
16
answered Is there a word for telling the truth (technically) in order to misguide?
Nov
11
awarded  Critic
Nov
11
comment “How much is/are the two fares?”
-1 Only 'are' makes sense here.
Nov
10
awarded  Scholar
Nov
10
accepted What is the origin and prevalence of the term “server” meaning “wait(er/ress)”?
Nov
9
comment What is the origin and prevalence of the term “server” meaning “wait(er/ress)”?
@horatio: Yes, that does sound plausible. After some thought, the genderless term I would use would be "waiter". @ Jay: Interesting examples, I had not considered those.
Nov
8
comment What is the origin and prevalence of the term “server” meaning “wait(er/ress)”?
Interesting hypotheses, but food service models have also changed in Australia without a resultant change in terminology. The gender-neutral theory sounds more plausible, but I'm unsure why "waiter/waitress" is considered to be not PC.
Nov
8
awarded  Student
Nov
8
asked What is the origin and prevalence of the term “server” meaning “wait(er/ress)”?
Oct
26
comment What is it called when words are deliberately written wrong but pronunciation is kept unchanged?
If 'nite' appears in your dictionary, please burn it immediately.
Sep
16
comment “Let's burn that bridge when we come to it” – is this sort of idiom mixing considered a pun, and if so, does it have a specific name?
If we can hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards. Checkmate. - zb
Sep
7
comment Term for someone who has experienced many hardships
I do not think this is correct. Someone who has attained success despite experiencing many hardships in their life would not be described as "an unfortunate".
Sep
7
awarded  Teacher
Sep
7
awarded  Supporter
Sep
7
answered Term for someone who has experienced many hardships