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Aug
20
comment When should one use the comma versus the semicolon, and vice versa?
@ladenedge: Why don't you sue me? If this is illegal, then the majority of the users becomes convicted. I'm giving the source at the top of my answer, and I don't see why it is illegal to share information which was posted openly on another site. I'm not exposing "official secrets", yet I'm giving a useful answer with citation.
Aug
19
comment When should one use the comma versus the semicolon, and vice versa?
@mipadi: Aah, it was a tiring day. Thanks for pointing out :)
Aug
18
comment “Irregardless” vs. “irrespective”
An informal example: The photographer always says, irregardless of how his subjects are feeling, ‘Smile!’
Aug
16
comment Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?
english.stackexchange.com/questions/313/…
Aug
14
comment Answering “Have you got” questions with “I do”
Please see my edit.
Aug
14
comment Can “anyways” be used at the beginning of a sentence?
You're right. I meant that "anyway" is better than "anyways" as it is referred to as more formal.
Aug
14
comment Answering “Have you got” questions with “I do”
No. The short form is just "Yes I do" and the long form is "Yes I have ice cream" or "Yes I have some ice cream".
Aug
14
comment Term for catchy tune that stays in your head
@mmyers: The definition "sticky tune" can be seen on Cambridge dictionary. Some friends of mine use it.
Aug
13
comment Term for catchy tune that stays in your head
The German word is Ohrwurm.
Aug
13
comment How can I practice differentiating between the “æ” and “ɛ” sounds in English phonology?
Great answer! Thanks.
Aug
13
comment What is a word called that has more than one syllable?
Anyway, poly always means "more than one".
Aug
13
comment What is a word called that has more than one syllable?
I think there is something wrong with the quick definition on that page. I looked at the definitions and they say "more than one syllable". Besides, "more than 3 syllables" means "minimum of 4 syllables" which is nonsense.
Aug
13
comment What is a word called that has more than one syllable?
I think there is something wrong with the quick definition on that page. I looked at the definitions and they say "more than one syllable". Besides, "more than 3 syllables" means "minimum of 4 syllables" which is nonsense. Anyway, poly always means "more than one".