17,210 reputation
2590165
bio website twitter.com/mehper
location Istanbul, Turkiye
age 36
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 2 days ago

profile for Mehper C. Palavuzlar on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites mehper.tr.gg

Industrial Engineer M.Sc.



Apr
3
comment Meaning of “game of thrones”
@Marthaª: ... and yes, Movies.SE does handle TV series.
Apr
3
comment Meaning of “game of thrones”
@Marthaª: Game of Thrones has become very popular as a TV series recently. The novel, which is titled "A Game of Thrones", comprises the TV series created by HBO. As the name "Game of Thrones" (without an A) belongs to the TV series, I recommended Movies.SE.
Apr
2
comment Meaning of “game of thrones”
You may try asking this on movies.stackexchange.com
Apr
1
comment Is it correct to use this expression in an email: “Attached you may find …”?
@jwpat7: Hi. I think you misunderstood the point of my question. This is not a duplicate because the "comma part" is just a side-question. My main question is about grammaticality of "Attached you may find ..." expression.
Mar
25
comment Meaning of 'snuff' as in 'snuff film'
Of course, but I suggest we continue our chat another time as I need to leave now. See you then.
Mar
25
comment Meaning of 'snuff' as in 'snuff film'
I didn't know about the term 'snuff film' so I checked a few dictionaries which say it's about pornography (IMDB only says snuff film). Do you say snuff film does not necessarily have to mean porn?
Mar
25
comment Meaning of 'snuff' as in 'snuff film'
Correct, but IMDB says They realize that unless they escape, they'll be the next victims of a snuff film.
Mar
25
comment Meaning of 'snuff' as in 'snuff film'
I learnt this term by dint of Vacancy (2007).
Mar
18
comment “Try to save” or “try saving”
possible duplicate of When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive?
Mar
18
comment Word for introducing people without knowing their names
Related: What colloquial word is used when you don't remember a word but you want to use something for it?
Mar
14
comment Dropping L in compound adjectives. Is it “skillful” or “skilful”?
I may fall into that line soon, as well. :)
Mar
13
comment Dropping L in compound adjectives. Is it “skillful” or “skilful”?
My NGram link: books.google.com/ngrams/…
Mar
13
comment Dropping L in compound adjectives. Is it “skillful” or “skilful”?
Your graphs include 2 new terms which are ending with fuLL. I don't think it's correct.
Mar
13
comment Pronunciation of “you're”
@PeterShor: Why don't you convert your above comments into an answer for the record? I would definitely give an upvote myself.
Mar
10
comment Is it “quit” or “quitted”?
@Matt: I think you should replace your graph with the one FumbleFingers gave. The keywords you used may be misleading. The keyword "quit work" does not necessarily have to be simple past or past participle. It may be preceded by auxiliary verbs like will, would, may, can, could, must, etc. In that sense, your graph is misleading, but FumbleFingers' example provides us with a good insight.
Mar
10
comment Is it “quit” or “quitted”?
Very interesting!
Mar
8
comment Is it “quit” or “quitted”?
If it differs, both.
Feb
28
comment What do you call someone who is easy to relate to?
+1 for kindred spirit.
Feb
27
comment “Lowercase”, “lower-case”, or “lower case”
@Robusto: I appreciate your correction and thanks for sharing the true method for ngrams. Shame on ngram developers.
Feb
27
comment “Lowercase”, “lower-case”, or “lower case”
@Robusto: I'll remove lower-case and add lower - case to my answer, but still this is not misleading. Usage of lower-case is still less than the other two.