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Jan
18
answered “error” or “wrong”?
Jan
18
comment “End with” vs. “end in”
It doesn't mean anything else, I just think that it's more convenient to use with. Personally, I've never seen ending in in technical documentations. That doesn't mean it's wrong, of course. It's up to you. ;)
Jan
18
answered “End with” vs. “end in”
Jan
17
answered “Worse comes to worst” or “worst comes to worst”
Jan
14
revised “in the year 1908” or “in the year of 1908”
deleted 2 characters in body; edited title
Jan
14
awarded  Mortarboard
Jan
14
revised Is there a rule about double negations that aren't meant as double negations (e.g. “We don't need no education”)?
edited body; edited title
Jan
14
comment Changes in English names of people
The name Richard is very old and its true origins may well be lost in the depths of time past. The name likely stems from Old English, since 'Ric' meant ruler and 'heard' meant hard. It is also feasible that with the advent of rhyming slang, Richard would be shortened to Rich and then to Rick and on to Dick. Much like William - Will - Bill.
Jan
14
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
14
comment “noone”, “no one” or “no-one”?
@Jon Purdy: Wow, I didn't know about noöne.
Jan
14
answered Changes in English names of people
Jan
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
13
answered “He thought that that might be awkward.”
Jan
13
revised “noone”, “no one” or “no-one”?
deleted 18 characters in body
Jan
13
answered “noone”, “no one” or “no-one”?
Jan
13
revised Colon use when introducing a list split across sentences
edited title
Jan
13
answered Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”?
Jan
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
8
revised Using “dear”, “darling”, or “honey” to address a friend
edited title