742 reputation
512
bio website richard.gadsden.name
location Manchester, United Kingdom
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Apr 16 at 20:43
VB6 / VB.NET programmer, mostly Office, some ASP.NET Also security, server and network administrator. And even helpdesk tech when they're short-staffed.

Published and promoted by Richard Gadsden, 179 Moss Bank Road, St. Helens Merseyside WA11 7DH. Printed / Hosted by Peak Internet, 1600 Western Blvd, Suite 180, Corvallis, OR 97333.


Feb
27
revised Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
edited body
Feb
26
comment Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
Thanks, Peter - I couldn't find that breakdown. Is Japanese a large group?
Feb
26
revised Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
It appears that the census bureau does supply a breakdown; I just couldn't find it.
Feb
26
answered Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
Feb
26
comment Why are certain categories of words more likely to vary between British and American English?
@mgb East Anglia is a big Norse area, though. As well as the Norse words (like "they") in general English, there are more in dialect in Northern England (the former Kingdom of Jorvik), East Anglia and the East Midlands (the former Five Boroughs of the Danelaw) than in dialects of the other parts of England (above all, the London/Home Counties dialect that became the standard British English).
Dec
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
13
comment Has elision revised the standard spelling of any words in the past century?
"wholesale spelling reform cuts succeeding generations off from their cultural heritage". This suggests one environment where it might happen: where a powerful authority deliberately wishes to cut off the cultural heritage. One especially good example is the Atatürk reform of Turkish from an Arabic alphabet to a Latin alphabet.
Dec
13
comment Spelling of “moustache”
+1 for Tache-wedd
Dec
13
comment Which variant of English should I use when my target audience is the world?
Wikipedia's solution is brilliant 99% of the time and provokes massive arguments 1% of the time. The classic example is en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixed-wing_aircraft which was created in order not to have an aeroplane or airplane article (though, there now is an airplane article).
Dec
13
comment What's the difference between “rent” and “hire” in British and American English?
@Mari-LouA Backhoe is only used as technical vocabulary in British English. The vehicles are referred to as "diggers" or as (genericized trademark) "JCBs" in non-technical contexts.
Nov
27
awarded  Yearling
Jul
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
25
answered How did “sinister”, the Latin word for “left-handed”, get its current meaning?
Jun
25
comment Why do we “chalk it up” to something (or someone)?
I note that there are several answers that reference "chalking up a debt". It may be worth pointing out the related idiom "put it on [my|our] slate" for someone building up a debt (typically, a bar tab, which they intend to pay off at the end of the night).
Feb
2
comment Is 'deuce' (tennis) a corruption of the French phrase 'à deux de jeu'?
It may possibly be worth pointing out that in modern French (e.g. scoring at Roland Garros), there is a distinction between "quarante à" and "égalité", where they would both be "deuce" in English.
Feb
2
comment Offensiveness of “black” in reference to race or skin colour
@Mechanicalsnail Yes, he was specifically who I was thinking of when I wrote "a black person of other descent acculturated amongst slave-descendants". Like most communities, it can absorb immigrants.
Jan
28
answered An expression for “a little thing that adds to common good”
Oct
10
comment Why does legal English continue to remain archaic?
Rules for games are the same. Go read the actual rules for even something as simple as Monopoly and you might as well be reading a legal contract.
Oct
10
comment Why does legal English continue to remain archaic?
Sometimes legal documents have to have a very precise amount of ambiguity. Of course, you're not supposed to write a contract such that party A thinks it means X and party B thinks it means Y, but sometimes it's the only way to get them to sign the bloody thing!
Oct
10
comment Why do courts use “What say you?”
Real wig: made from human hair; fake wig: not.