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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 38 votes cast
Apr
30
comment Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
@Mitch because there are lots of Pakistanis and Bangladeshis in Britain too, while there are very few in the US
Sep
15
awarded  Yearling
Jun
30
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jun
30
comment “That was me” vs. “That was I”
@SteelyDan It's dead. It's kicked the bucket, it's shuffled off its mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the bleedin' choir invisible.
Jun
30
comment Which is correct: “This is her” or “This is she”?
@Nick "Equality is symmetric in mathematics" is what I was avoiding saying, because it isn't useful communication in an example to use technical language from another field.
Jun
30
comment General term for muggle-type terms?
Some more examples: "mono" (-sexual, used by bisexuals), "normals" (various), "cis" (by transfolk).
Jun
30
comment Objects with no name, like “the Sun”
@NewAlexandria The Earth.
Jun
30
comment What do you call a daughter with the same name as her mother?
In Latin (from which it is derived), iunior inflects the same for both masculine and feminine genders, as it's third declension.
Jun
30
comment “Cleats” vs. “soccer shoes”
@ColinFine not necessarily - "running shoes" have spikes on, and are shoes rather than boots. Golf shoes also. Football and rugby boots are so-called because they were proper boots (ie above the ankle) in the nineteenth century and the names stuck.
Apr
25
comment Is “misogyny” only applicable to men? What is the antonym of misogyny?
In feminist theory, they talk about "internalised misogyny", when they mean women not trusting themselves because they are women. Depending on the context, this could refer either to the writer intentionally writing Lemon as having internalised misogyny, or the writer themselves being misogynist. Since, in fact, the principal writer of 30 Rock is Tina Fey, the actress that plays Liz Lemon, I'd suggest the former interpretation.
Apr
25
comment Can “née” be used for entities other than people?
@Cerberus that would be a really good question, actually. When using née/né in relation to anything other than a married woman's maiden name, what are the rules for which one you should use? I started writing a comment here and realised it was an answer to that question.
Feb
27
revised Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
edited body
Feb
26
comment Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
Thanks, Peter - I couldn't find that breakdown. Is Japanese a large group?
Feb
26
revised Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
It appears that the census bureau does supply a breakdown; I just couldn't find it.
Feb
26
answered Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?
Feb
26
comment Why are certain categories of words more likely to vary between British and American English?
@mgb East Anglia is a big Norse area, though. As well as the Norse words (like "they") in general English, there are more in dialect in Northern England (the former Kingdom of Jorvik), East Anglia and the East Midlands (the former Five Boroughs of the Danelaw) than in dialects of the other parts of England (above all, the London/Home Counties dialect that became the standard British English).
Dec
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
13
comment Has elision revised the standard spelling of any words in the past century?
"wholesale spelling reform cuts succeeding generations off from their cultural heritage". This suggests one environment where it might happen: where a powerful authority deliberately wishes to cut off the cultural heritage. One especially good example is the Atatürk reform of Turkish from an Arabic alphabet to a Latin alphabet.
Dec
13
comment Spelling of “moustache”
+1 for Tache-wedd
Dec
13
comment Which variant of English should I use when my target audience is the world?
Wikipedia's solution is brilliant 99% of the time and provokes massive arguments 1% of the time. The classic example is en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixed-wing_aircraft which was created in order not to have an aeroplane or airplane article (though, there now is an airplane article).