344 reputation
313
bio website bitmask.de
location Germany
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Feb 22 at 22:37

Hey, I am a computer scientist and enthusiast programmer, who sometimes worries too much about architecture/design.

Accept policy

If you wonder why I didn't accept your answer, although it is obviously the right thing: Usually, I like to wait at least an hour before accepting anything, often I wait a day or so.

More random information about me

kernel: linux
distro: debian
interface: xmonad+gnome
text: vim
web: opera
mail: icedove (aka thunderbird)
programming: c++, bash
speak: de, en, es (rusty), fr (very! limited)
rcs: git
scifi: The Matrix, Star Trek, Doctor Who, Firefly

First to earn the the-matrix bronze badge on scifi.SE.

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profile for bitmask on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites

Bad Wolf


Jan
17
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
11
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
10
awarded  Notable Question
May
24
awarded  Popular Question
May
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
11
comment Question about likely vulgar expressions
Where do you get from that the meaning of "to screw sb." has the same roots as "to screw sth. up". There are examples for both cases: compare "to fuck sth. up" (clear vulgar connection) and "to mess sth. up" (no apparent vulgar connection). You seem to imply "screw" to fall in the first category without giving the second a second thought.
Feb
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
11
accepted What is the grammatical construct using present progressive in relative clauses called?
Jan
10
comment What is the grammatical construct using present progressive in relative clauses called?
Thanks to your information I found a very good site describing how the present participle phrase works.
Jan
9
comment What is the grammatical construct using present progressive in relative clauses called?
note: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Flintstone
Jan
9
comment What is the grammatical construct using present progressive in relative clauses called?
@TimLymington: Hmmm, I think you're right, it should read "what", shouldn't it?
Jan
9
asked What is the grammatical construct using present progressive in relative clauses called?
Dec
28
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
8
accepted What do you call “to be to” constructions and are they proper/good English?
Dec
6
comment What do you call “to be to” constructions and are they proper/good English?
Thanks, that makes sense. Still, my main concern was whether this was formal English in the stricter sense and fit for formal texts.
Dec
6
revised What do you call “to be to” constructions and are they proper/good English?
changed emphasis
Dec
6
comment What do you call “to be to” constructions and are they proper/good English?
@Gigili: Thanks for the link; that sheds some preliminary light on the issue.
Dec
6
asked What do you call “to be to” constructions and are they proper/good English?
Oct
11
comment Is the “overseas” bushism really so absurd?
Well, I suppose the question could be rephrased as "Under the assumption that this quote was not a slip of the tongue, what meaning would a native speaker of American English associate with the word 'overseas'." It is very possible he meant to say something else, but I'm trying to understand if the translated version of the quote I originally heard was accurate (where "overseas" was translated with "Ausland" instead of "Übersee" which lacks the ambiguity of the original phrasing).
Oct
11
comment Is the “overseas” bushism really so absurd?
@MετάEd: The question is if the word "overseas" means only countries that are accessible only over water or any foreign country. How does that depend on opinion? Note that I'm not asking if his statement is true or false.