101 reputation
4
bio website keith-s-thompson.github.com
location San Diego, CA
age 54
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jul 16 at 18:04

I'm a programmer and all-around nerd living in San Diego, California and working at JetHead Development Inc.

E-mail: Keith.S.Thompson@gmail.com


Jul
16
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
@CupawnTae: On the other hand, it does work in some contexts: "To boldly go where no one has gone before." (Or, as DOuglas Adams wrote, "To boldly split infinitives ...")
Sep
21
awarded  Commentator
Sep
21
comment Is 'women of cover' an idiom in use in the U.S.?
@FumbleFingers: At least in the US, "woman/man/person of color" is not considered offensive. The term was introduced several decades ago specifically as a replacement for older and more offensive terms. I see you're from the UK; is it generally considered offensive there? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Person_of_color
May
10
comment “Warm” is to “warmth” as “cool” is to what?
Why is "coolness" not suitable?
May
10
awarded  Supporter
May
10
comment “Warm” is to “warmth” as “cool” is to what?
I agree that "coolness" is the word that corresponds most closely to "warmth". "coolth" is structurally closest, but it's archaic. Most of the other suggestions, (cold, coldness, chill) carry a connotation of harshness that "warmth" distinctly lacks. This is admittedly inconsistent. If that kind of inconsistency bothers you, perhaps English is not the language for you. 8-)}
May
10
comment “Warm” is to “warmth” as “cool” is to what?
Similar, but IMHO "chill" has a harsher feel to it than "coolness". Warmth and coolness are pleasant; chill is not.
May
1
comment Etymology of 'cartesian'
@tchrist: As I said, I got it from dictionary.com, which could well be incorrect; Wiktionary shows the Latin as carta.
May
1
comment Etymology of 'cartesian'
The term carte for map predates Descartes. According to dictionary.com: "before 1150; Middle English, Old English: writing paper, document, letter < Latin charta < Greek chárt─ôs sheet of papyrus". The similarity appears to be entirely coincidental.
Apr
21
awarded  Analytical
Apr
19
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
The problem with "one" is that, unlike "he" or "she", it refers to some unspecified but individual person, not to the specific person you're talking about. For example, I don't know how to translate "I saw him from across the street" to use "one"; "I saw one from across the street" doesn't convey the same meaning (and is much clumsier).
Mar
21
comment Is there a name for an answer to a question that does nothing but rephrase the question in an answer form?
@MarkBeadles: You beat me to it!
Jan
8
comment Why do we “roll” the car windows down, instead of “slide”
@GEdgar: I have a rotary dial application on my touchscreen mobile phone.
Jan
8
comment “I'm right, aren't I?”
I wouldn't say that aren't I is a case of using are with I. Rather it uses aren't as a contraction of am not (which is admittedly questionable). People who say Aren't I right? would (probably) never say Are I right?; they'd say Am I right?
Nov
13
awarded  Autobiographer