3,926 reputation
1616
bio website mooseware.ca
location Mississauga, Canada
age 51
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Apr 15 at 12:33

I'm a professional software developer with more than twenty years of experience across many industries and the entire systems development lifecycle. I'm the principal consultant at Mooseware Limited.

@joelabrown

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Jan
19
comment When should “no problem” replace “you're welcome” as a response to “thank you”?
@Michael - I found "uh huh" being used a lot in Florida. To my stereotypically polite Canadian ears it sounded sarcastic! The first time someone said it to me I thought to myself "what, did I do something to offend them somehow?" I eventually got used to it, but I had to be really careful not to pick it up as a habit to take home with me!
Dec
25
revised What does “disarm and waylay one's heart” mean?
Expanded comments on "disarmed" and "waylaid" per OP's request.
Dec
25
comment What does “blow over someone's quest” mean?
@RajeshKSingh - Henry Ford was a visionary. On the other hand he was a huge bigot, so you can't assume that everyone will be a big fan of the man. Probably more to the point, there are people who like to disparage all industrialists. It's fashionable in some circles to criticize the people who built western society. I once had a professor that used to pine for the agrarian monastic lifestyle. He didn't like me pointing out that if everyone lived an agrarian monastic lifestyle society wouldn't be able to afford universities, so he'd be out of a job.
Dec
25
answered What does “disarm and waylay one's heart” mean?
Dec
25
answered What does “blow over someone's quest” mean?
Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
29
answered What does it mean by “they see me rollin', they hatin'”?
Aug
29
awarded  Yearling
Aug
4
comment What is the meaning of “tap dance to work”?
This is not a common English expression. It takes its meaning from the general happy tone of old Hollywood song and dance movies where the characters would break out into a happy song and do a tap dance.
Aug
2
comment How to express the time period between now and a year from now?
@QuestionOverflow - Your question is not well constructed insofar as you aren't at all clear on what you want to say. If you prefer, you can read my answer as "Say what you mean precisely, since there is no English expression for that type of time span."
Aug
1
answered How to express the time period between now and a year from now?
Jul
10
answered What does “short” mean in “Did the flight crew simply land the aircraft short?”?
Jun
28
revised When did it become incorrect to use apostrophes with possessive pronouns?
Embedded Ngram picture on behalf of the poster whose rep isn't high enough yet.
Jun
23
answered Can I replace the following verbs with more appropriate ones?
May
23
comment Why is there a difference in the adoption of “Kindergarten” in American and British English?
Just to add to the mix, growing up in Canada in the 1960s and 1970s, Kindergarten was an optional school for 4 year olds that you attended prior to Grade 1. If you attended any school prior to that, it was called a Nursery School. These days, they call these schools for 3 and 4 year olds Junior Kindergarten and Senior Kindergarten in Canada.
May
6
comment “Café” vs. “coffee shop” in American English
There are probably lots of regional differences on this one. In some places people will say "Coffee Shop" when they mean Central Perk whereas in others people will mean a diner like the one on Seinfeld. I agree with Edwin that in British (and Canadian) English, café is common enough that a class distinction is no longer very strong. Witness: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCaf%C3%A9
May
6
answered “Café” vs. “coffee shop” in American English
Apr
29
comment Understanding “as of”, “as at”, and “as from”
@ColinFine - Thanks. I personally have not encountered as from used in this way and I would agree with your mother wholeheartedly.
Apr
29
answered Understanding “as of”, “as at”, and “as from”