4,186 reputation
11018
bio website mooseware.ca
location Mississauga, Canada
age 52
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Nov 17 at 1:34

I'm a professional software developer with more than twenty years of experience across many industries and the entire systems development lifecycle. I'm the principal consultant at Mooseware Limited.

@joelabrown

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Nov
11
comment Keep in mind that neither “A” nor “B” will change; only “C”
All of these are correct. There are other variations possible. The last one is the most direct, but they are all pretty clear.
Oct
26
answered Is “to boil down” formal enough to be used in scientific writing?
Sep
17
answered What is it called when organizations set stations (tables and stuff) to deliver information?
Sep
12
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
3
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
29
comment Can “sitcom” be considered an “acronym”? A Syllabic Acronym? Or a Hybrid Acronym?
@Mari-LouA - I'm curious which part of the Wikipedia definition you feel fits sitcom poorly. Fusing-sounds, check. Fusing meanings, check. Blending two words, check. Admittedly not a single morph, but then neither is motel. The requirement that a portmanteau be a single morph is highly arguable.
Aug
29
answered Can “sitcom” be considered an “acronym”? A Syllabic Acronym? Or a Hybrid Acronym?
Aug
29
awarded  Yearling
Aug
29
comment “Should you pull a ‘Burger King’ to cut your tax bill?” - What figurative device is it?
Arguably a metalepsis (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metalepsis), which is a type of metonym.
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
10
awarded  Caucus
Apr
23
comment Indian English use of “only” for emphasis
@lrn - Using only instead of but or however is relatively common in my experience. What seems to be particular to some Indian English speakers is using only for this purpose at the end of the sentence. I've always assumed this comes from a Hindi syntactical convention or idiom being applied in translation. Similarly, lots of Indian English speakers I know would say "How it is going?" instead of "How's it going?"
Apr
23
answered Indian English use of “only” for emphasis
Jan
19
comment When should “no problem” replace “you're welcome” as a response to “thank you”?
@Michael - I found "uh huh" being used a lot in Florida. To my stereotypically polite Canadian ears it sounded sarcastic! The first time someone said it to me I thought to myself "what, did I do something to offend them somehow?" I eventually got used to it, but I had to be really careful not to pick it up as a habit to take home with me!
Dec
25
revised What does “disarm and waylay one's heart” mean?
Expanded comments on "disarmed" and "waylaid" per OP's request.
Dec
25
comment What does “blow over someone's quest” mean?
@RajeshKSingh - Henry Ford was a visionary. On the other hand he was a huge bigot, so you can't assume that everyone will be a big fan of the man. Probably more to the point, there are people who like to disparage all industrialists. It's fashionable in some circles to criticize the people who built western society. I once had a professor that used to pine for the agrarian monastic lifestyle. He didn't like me pointing out that if everyone lived an agrarian monastic lifestyle society wouldn't be able to afford universities, so he'd be out of a job.
Dec
25
answered What does “disarm and waylay one's heart” mean?
Dec
25
answered What does “blow over someone's quest” mean?
Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened