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seen Oct 4 '11 at 10:07

Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
22
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
Jan
21
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
Mar
8
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
17
answered Difference between “instantly” and “instantaneously”
Sep
17
comment “1 out of 100 chickens is” or “1 out of 100 chickens are”?
Actually, Jerry, what i'm trying to say is that the phrase "one out of a hundred" doesn't make sense for items or instances that number a hundred or less, nor much sense (except in highly theoretical, extremely rare instances) for things that number 200 or less.But beyond that, the question i asked Thursagen is legitimate, and i'm posing it to you all: is there anyone here who cares to tell me what the sentence "One out of a hundred are determinedly set" means? If "One" is the subject, then it should be easy to tell me precisely what that sentence precisely means, no?
Sep
17
comment “1 out of 100 chickens is” or “1 out of 100 chickens are”?
@Thursagen: Care to tell me what this sentence is talking about? "One out of a hundred are determinedly set."
Sep
17
comment “1 out of 100 chickens is” or “1 out of 100 chickens are”?
No, Thursagen; you are parsing the sentence completely wrong. "One out of a hundred" is clearly an adjectival phrase with an implied noun. Again: one simply CANNOT say "one out of a hundred are..." without first establishing what the root noun is. Otherwise, the sentence is utterly meaningless. You are stubbornly neglecting this fundamental contextual truth. One cannot say "One out of a hundred are...." without having first told everyone one out of a hundred what. That is a classic, unambiguous case of an implied noun.
Sep
17
comment “1 out of 100 chickens is” or “1 out of 100 chickens are”?
On what principle do you base that argument? See the example conversation i produced above, and please tell me how it is inaccurate in its analysis.
Sep
17
revised “1 out of 100 chickens is” or “1 out of 100 chickens are”?
added 275 characters in body
Sep
17
answered “1 out of 100 chickens is” or “1 out of 100 chickens are”?
Sep
17
comment On Saturday afternoon or in the Saturday afternoon?
Yes, Colin -- i realized that as i was re-reading the answer, just now. I was so focused on the context of OP's question that i completely failed to take a step back and re-examine the phrase from a broader perspective. And thank you, brilliant, for the thank you.
Sep
16
revised Which is correct, “on-line” or “online”?
added 194 characters in body
Sep
16
answered Which is correct, “on-line” or “online”?
Sep
16
comment 'I get it' vs. 'I got it'
"I got it" is ungrammatical, and while it may correspond to the pronunciation used by many native speakers, in truth what sounds like "I got it" is the contracted form of "I've got it." Just because people don't know that's what they're saying doesn't mean that's not what they're saying; it just means they're unreflective about their language usage and need to learn to defer to those of us who actually think about what we're saying.