774 reputation
310
bio website jeffkemponoracle.com
location Perth, Australia
age 39
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen Jan 25 at 9:20

Oracle Database Designer and Developer

Since 2000 Jeffrey has designed, developed, maintained and enhanced a variety of large and small custom applications for the government sector using Oracle Database 7.3, 8i, 9i, 10g and 11g; Application Express 3.1, 3.2, 4.0, 4.1, and 4.2; Oracle Forms 4.5, 6i, 9i and 10g; Oracle Reports 2.5, 6i and 9i.

He has particular interests and experience in Oracle SQL, PL/SQL, database performance tuning, and Oracle Application Express (APEX).


Jan
21
answered Is it correct to use a comma in the following case?
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
From the semantic point of view we can bolster this claim; for example, "and other local taxes" implies that the "property taxes" here are merely one example from a set.
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
There are arguments from both syntax and semantics, both based on the logic of interpretation (i.e. start by assuming the writer wrote the way they did deliberately). If the writer wanted to give a list it would be make it less clear to use multiple and's - they should use commas (e.g. Property taxes, other local taxes, state taxation, and spending may not be...). Since they didn't choose this, one can can make the inference that the and's convey more meaning than just delimiting a list.
Dec
18
answered how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
I would only read it as state spending may not...
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
The only other interpretations I can think of make the assumption that the original writer made a typographical error. But if I start with the assumption that they knew what they were doing, I would only read it the way we've said.
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
Probably just a single comma would be enough: Property taxes and other local taxes, and state taxation and spending may not be...
Dec
18
comment Synonym for “hands-on”
That makes sense, thanks.
Dec
18
comment Word that describes a repeating pattern across orders of magnitude of scale
I'm not a physicist but I'm pretty sure the forces that hold atoms together are not called "gravity". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_interaction#The_interactions
Dec
18
comment omitting relative pronoun in a non-restrictive clause
It's the difference between saying "John, who married Susan, sold his house." and "John, having married Susan, sold his house." The latter implies that the marriage led to the sale of the house, whereas the former is ambiguous in this regard.
Dec
18
comment Synonym for “hands-on”
Would you put a hyphen in there, though? I've always written it as I saw him in person.
Dec
18
answered Most like / Like most
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
Otherwise it should have been Property taxes, other local taxes, state taxation, and spending may not be ...
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
I'd look at the preceding text (no, I'm not going to look it up myself) to work out from the context where the groupings are. On my first reading I saw it the way you did: {Property taxes and other local taxes} and {state taxation and spending} may not be ...
Nov
19
comment For the first time - the first time
#2 sounds mildly incorrect to me.
Nov
19
comment For the first time - the first time
"Yesterday I won a prize for the first time." does not necessarily imply that you had been trying to win a prize before yesterday. If it's important you'd make it explicit, e.g. "Yesterday, after many prior losses, I finally won a prize.", or, "I never won a prize until yesterday."
Nov
19
comment Need vs. Needs?
I need, We need, You need, He needs, They need. 1st/2nd person = need. 3rd person singular = needs. 3rd person plural = need. I would say Pittsburgh needs to win this game because Pittsburgh is singular and 3rd person. The Pittsburgh players need to win this game because players is plural and 3rd person.
Nov
19
comment Does “argumentative” have negative connotation? If so, what's a more neutral word?
argument may be positive or negative (it's good to offer a good argument for your point of view), but argumentative is always a personality flaw in that it describes a bickering manner.
Nov
19
comment Book: There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book
@mplungjan, capitalisation is generally optional for less important words like "in", "of", and "the".
Nov
4
comment Is there a generic word for “all of x type of thing”?
Not sure there is any word since the concept isn't generally useful. One might say a "forest" or "galaxy", but rarely does one need to refer to "the set of all trees/stars in existence".