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seen Jul 8 at 13:57

I speak UK English with a slight scottish twist


Sep
22
comment “Software craftsman” as complimentary term for programmer
@FumbleFingers I was thinking of "elegant" in the sense that a maths proof is "elegant" when it is a clean simple proof.
Sep
22
comment “Software craftsman” as complimentary term for programmer
@FumbleFingers - yes but to me it also carries overtones of both technical skills and, for want of a better term, "art". Good code is technically good and aesthetically pleasing or maybe "elegant" is a better word?
Sep
22
comment Use of “compensate” to mean “help pay cost”
or maybe "towards this cost". And "compensate" is not right there. It implies to me more something done in balance of something else.
Sep
21
comment Double 'not' in questions - how is it correct?
+1 - some people use a double negative to emphasize the negative rather than negate it so I always check or give a long answer like "It's not covered".
Sep
21
comment What do you call a person who is easily replaced?
You might like this T shirt thinkgeek.com/tshirts-apparel/unisex/generic/5b6f
Sep
21
comment If you're using a quote with a period but do not want to end the sentence, do you keep the period?
I'll see your wikipedia and raise you Fowler 2nd Edition where the replacing of periods by commas is absent.
Sep
20
comment Just how offensive are the terms “retarded” and “gay”?
A wonderfully nuanced answer.
Sep
20
comment A single word for labelling someone a disbeliever in a particular religion despite them adhering to it
I see why you said this but I think the better word would be "apostate".
Sep
20
comment Can you use the word “transient” as a verb?
In that case I'd probably go with Dan's transit.
Sep
20
comment Can you use the word “transient” as a verb?
Thinking some more, and specifically of KISS, "the system the client data passes through". To my mind acceptable to both technical and non-technical readers.
Sep
20
comment Can you use the word “transient” as a verb?
Transit is quite good but I would be puzzled by traverse if I came across it in a manual.
Sep
20
comment What is the name of this type of word: “Mr.”, “Ms.”, “Dr.”?
Style is perfectly valid in British English. 9. chiefly (Brit) the distinguishing title or form of address of a person or firm
Sep
20
comment Words for personal views on life, society, world
Yes it has but one doesn't encounter it in everyday use. Used by writers who can assume an educated audience. Otherwise perhaps "personal philosophy" or "outlook on life" etc
Sep
20
comment “Exact a price” versus “extract a price”
I tentatively agree. If I heard someone "extract a price" I would take it to mean that someone had been unwilling to give a price. "He was coy with the price but I extracted a price from him". Whereas exact a price would be to compel payment or similar.