Reputation
2,440
Next privilege 2,500 Rep.
Create tag synonyms
Badges
4 11
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~335k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 95 votes cast
Mar
15
comment Pronunciation of “loch”
Well this Scot agrees with you but also reserves the right to poke fun at anyone pronouncing it thus. ;-) +1
Mar
15
comment Pronunciation of “loch”
So the Scots and Welsh aren't Brits?
Jan
19
comment Suitable abstraction for Email and SMS
This is similar to what IBM's Sametime client does. Right click on a contact and there's an option "Send>" - select that and you get the option to send announcement or email.
Jan
19
comment Is there a name for the feeling “Damn, I already asked this question three years ago”?
deja Q? Sorry. I'll go now.
Dec
15
comment A proper name for Microsoft software
I think it works well in your context for a general audience.
Dec
15
comment A proper name for Microsoft software
"service" is an overloaded term on windows. Lots of thiangs run as services that do not offer services in the way these products do.
Dec
15
comment A proper name for Microsoft software
Yes, we use the term for all DB software, MQ, IBM WAS, CICS, etc as well as SQL server and share point. I assume Exchange 2010 is the server rather than the client?
Dec
15
comment A proper name for Microsoft software
Not "servers", "services".
Dec
14
comment An expression for law students using “tuppence”
Ah, I haven't heard that for a while or "not worth tuppence".
Dec
14
comment Is it correct to say, “Will you do it or NO?”
we appear to be of an age, so no, I don't. I stand corrected.
Dec
14
comment Is it correct to say, “Will you do it or NO?”
Also Shakespeare Twelth Night 1.5 "Of very ill manner; he'll speak with you, will you or no." It's correct but dated, I would say.
Dec
14
comment “An” average of vs. “The” average of
In general yes, but somehow I feel more comfortable with 6 rather than 5.
Dec
13
comment What's the name for those times when your attempts to get a task done right eventually get you to momentarily perform increasingly worse?
I've heard the phrase "performance fatigue" used for this but I'm failing to find a decent cite.
Dec
12
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Top of the morning to you”?
I notice you say "now" - my Galway father-in-law is heading for 80 and uses it so it may be his generation.
Dec
3
comment Word for inaccessible neighbour of a node in a graph
Maybe he means a directed graph? + 1 for nontraversible
Nov
30
comment Can a word that sounds the same as the way it is spelt be an initialism and an acronym?
Doh! (slaps head).
Nov
30
comment Can a word that sounds the same as the way it is spelt be an initialism and an acronym?
Context and local practice are the key. The software product CICS is pronounced "kicks" in the UK, spelled out as C.I.C.S in the US and pronounced as "cheeks" in Italy for example.
Nov
30
comment Difference between “spicy” and “hot”
+1 onomatomaniak. My Pocket OED defines piquant as "agreeably pungent, stimulating". I doubt anyone would apply that to a Thai red curry or a phal. "Hot ..(of pepper &c.) pungent" - note the lack of "agreeably". Note also that Scoville gives Scoville Heat Units so that rather argues against the wikipedia article.
Nov
29
comment Is “A Project Guide to UX Design” correct grammar?
I'm not up to date with UX and hadn't appreciated that "UX design" is an accepted term. I'm more used to terms like "user-centric design". Since it's a book for a target market I accept that the target market's ability to resolve the terms trumps my parsing of it. Since experience can be either a noun or a verb I find it's positioning sub-optimal in general terms.
Nov
29
comment What do you call the sound produced when baying?
And it's quite a specific sound as well. I would not say that bay is a subtype of bark. I read barking primarily as a warning/aggressive sound whereas baying is an excited encouragement to the pack.