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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Dec 19 at 7:39

I speak UK English with a slight scottish twist


Dec
15
comment A proper name for Microsoft software
"service" is an overloaded term on windows. Lots of thiangs run as services that do not offer services in the way these products do.
Dec
15
comment A proper name for Microsoft software
Yes, we use the term for all DB software, MQ, IBM WAS, CICS, etc as well as SQL server and share point. I assume Exchange 2010 is the server rather than the client?
Dec
15
comment A proper name for Microsoft software
Not "servers", "services".
Dec
14
comment An expression for law students using “tuppence”
Ah, I haven't heard that for a while or "not worth tuppence".
Dec
14
comment Is it correct to say, “Will you do it or NO?”
we appear to be of an age, so no, I don't. I stand corrected.
Dec
14
comment Is it correct to say, “Will you do it or NO?”
Also Shakespeare Twelth Night 1.5 "Of very ill manner; he'll speak with you, will you or no." It's correct but dated, I would say.
Dec
14
comment “An” average of vs. “The” average of
In general yes, but somehow I feel more comfortable with 6 rather than 5.
Dec
13
comment What's the name for those times when your attempts to get a task done right eventually get you to momentarily perform increasingly worse?
I've heard the phrase "performance fatigue" used for this but I'm failing to find a decent cite.
Dec
12
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Top of the morning to you”?
I notice you say "now" - my Galway father-in-law is heading for 80 and uses it so it may be his generation.
Dec
3
comment Word for inaccessible neighbour of a node in a graph
Maybe he means a directed graph? + 1 for nontraversible
Nov
30
comment Can a word that sounds the same as the way it is spelt be an initialism and an acronym?
Doh! (slaps head).
Nov
30
comment Can a word that sounds the same as the way it is spelt be an initialism and an acronym?
Context and local practice are the key. The software product CICS is pronounced "kicks" in the UK, spelled out as C.I.C.S in the US and pronounced as "cheeks" in Italy for example.
Nov
30
comment Difference between “spicy” and “hot”
+1 onomatomaniak. My Pocket OED defines piquant as "agreeably pungent, stimulating". I doubt anyone would apply that to a Thai red curry or a phal. "Hot ..(of pepper &c.) pungent" - note the lack of "agreeably". Note also that Scoville gives Scoville Heat Units so that rather argues against the wikipedia article.
Nov
29
comment Is “A Project Guide to UX Design” correct grammar?
I'm not up to date with UX and hadn't appreciated that "UX design" is an accepted term. I'm more used to terms like "user-centric design". Since it's a book for a target market I accept that the target market's ability to resolve the terms trumps my parsing of it. Since experience can be either a noun or a verb I find it's positioning sub-optimal in general terms.
Nov
29
comment What do you call the sound produced when baying?
And it's quite a specific sound as well. I would not say that bay is a subtype of bark. I read barking primarily as a warning/aggressive sound whereas baying is an excited encouragement to the pack.
Nov
29
comment Present perfect continuous and “for”
Only if you use "knowing" in the biblical sense.
Nov
29
comment A science-verb? Sciencing?
"Verbing weirds language" Calvin & Hobbes
Nov
29
comment When to use inverted word-order like “great an option”?
Possibly also OP missed an "an" -- i.e. it was "That is great as an option". I can visualize that for example in the context of building a menu.
Nov
24
comment Is there such a term as “dinner box”?
Yes to all the above. Thinking about times I've done overnight support etc I think I would just say something like "I brought my own dinner/tea" rather than any specific term.
Nov
24
comment Would “Greetings” be a better word to greet someone any time than the word “Hello”?
Yes, or "Good afternoon/evening". I would be guided by local idiom.