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seen Nov 6 at 14:06

I speak UK English with a slight scottish twist


Dec
4
comment login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
I see what you're saying but it's the "with" that I have trouble with. I suppose if it said "Authentication (noun) with X" I'd accept that so I see your point. It may be that my experience of seeing "login" as a verb is blocking my parsing, like the famous "The old man the boats" sentence. Fair enough.
Dec
4
comment What's the logical opposite to “onboarding”?
@Marthaª -yes, I think perhaps as onboarding seems more used and the process referred to as "offboarding" is often buried in a maze of euphemisms. Eg at IBM, we had Career Transition Programs and goodness knows what else.
Dec
4
comment login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
And I should have included the URL; please see oed.com/loginpage
Dec
4
comment login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
I'd disagree that "Login with Athens" can be read as a noun. CF "Userid with Athens". I respect your opinion and knowledge so I'd appreciate knowing your reasoning here.
Dec
4
comment What's the logical opposite to “onboarding”?
Googling "hr offboarding" turns up enough hits to suggest it's a recognized term.
Sep
4
comment plural noun/singular verb and vice versa
I think the singular noun would be used more in the case where you are contrasting with a situation where a given error does occur. E.g. "An error occurs when we start the program without a file but no error occurs when the file is loaded"
Aug
26
comment Where did the “unavailable” meaning of “Out of Pocket” come from?
Never heard this before. Is it a US usage?
Aug
26
comment Inverse for the word “define”
Apologies. Ed is right that this is not a helpful answer in terms of this sites goals.
Aug
25
comment Inverse for the word “define”
@ΜετάEd - perhaps you'd like to take a wild guess at what the "-ify" suffix does to a noun?
Aug
25
comment Inverse for the word “define”
"A brief and pertinent mode of speaking." to summarize a few online dictionaries. From Latin with roots brevis +‎ loquentia i.e brief and speaking.
Aug
25
comment “to comment out” before the era of programming
@tchrist Yes but it's still a useful and meaningful distinction in that compiled code (or pre-compiled code) won't generate compilation errors. To me it sounds like the old anti-OO argument that "it all ends up in the same instruction set anyway". Hmm, thinking about it I'm fuzzy on where you'd draw the line between shell scripts and interpreted languages.
Aug
24
comment “Not the same as” vs. “not the same like”
Sorry I meant friends whose native language is Cantonese speaking Chinese Pidgin English.
Aug
24
comment “Not the same as” vs. “not the same like”
I've only heard "the same like" from Cantonese friends.
Aug
22
comment Is the expression ‘a legitimate rape’ logically appropriate and viable?
@FumbleFingers - Granted but for many people it will not be absolutely clear that the word was used incorrectly as words change meaning or have special meanings in various contexts, so I think it's still a fair question. Some of the sepcial pleading in the answers is illuminating.
Aug
22
comment Usage of the expression “go they went”
I have a nagging feeling that I know this phrase from somewhere. Possibly I'm just misremembering some e.e.cummings.
Aug
22
comment Is the expression ‘a legitimate rape’ logically appropriate and viable?
@KitFox OO I like that so much I'm going to steal it. Thanks.
Aug
22
comment Is the expression ‘a legitimate rape’ logically appropriate and viable?
@FumbleFingers While I think Akin needs "10 rolls of rubber wallpaper and a double lobotomy", I do think this is a legitimate question asking about possible nuances of a word.
Aug
21
comment “Success” or “successes”
+1 I would favour successes in contexts where I was also acknowledging the failures either explicitly or (thouh less likely) implicitly, I think.
Aug
21
comment How to describe the phenomenon of “small” people being ignored on the Internet
+1 for RegDwight The answers here are direct refutations of the OP's premise IMHO.
Aug
20
comment A more acceptable word to replace the word “rectum”?
+1. I'd just add that if you're looking for something more euphemistic you could try "back passage" but to be honest it's hard to write such a juvenile idea in an adult fashion.