Reputation
2,440
Next privilege 2,500 Rep.
Create tag synonyms
Badges
4 11
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~335k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 95 votes cast
Nov
20
comment What does “touch off a scramble” mean? Is it an idiom or simple combination of “touch off” and “a scramble”?
Scramble may have been more popular after the Battle of Britain as that was the word used for a fast deployment of fighters. RAF pilots would "scramble" their aircraft.
Nov
19
comment Where does the phrase “get a bye” come from?
My Concise Oxford dictionary of Etymology makes some rather ambiguous reference to "secondary" events in sports but my google-fu is proving weak today.
Nov
19
comment Alternate database term for variations in data?
How about "anthropocentric presentation format"? ;-) You might want to google "FD:OCA" - for support for using "format".
Nov
18
answered Alternate database term for variations in data?
Nov
18
comment What's the antonym for 'word'?
"Noise"? It carries the secondary implication of "signal to noise ratio".
Nov
18
awarded  Editor
Nov
18
revised Is there an alternative expression for 'opening band' or 'opening act'?
Pointer to a better answer
Nov
18
answered Is there an alternative expression for 'opening band' or 'opening act'?
Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
17
answered “I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream”- Is there a term that describes this 'word play'?
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
@Clément - lol! Lost track while trying to remember charmap to get the accent characters. Thanks for the correction.
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
@Irene, sorry if I came across snooty, I was in a rush as I had to prepare my daughter's tea.
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
@Irene, thank you but I have read on the subject e.g. amazon.co.uk/Story-English-Robert-McCrum/dp/0571275087/… If you follow the bl.uk link above as well you'll find a remarkably concise illustration. BTW the language(s)/dialects spoken by the Anglo-Saxons is usually referred to as Old English.
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
Partly because English inherited via French (dévour) via Old French (dévorer) and the Latin as Raku says. So blame the French!
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
For those interested bl.uk/learning/langlit/changlang/across/languagetimeline.html
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
I just checked my copy of the "Oxford Encyclopedia of Language" and English is classified as Indo-European -> Germanic -> West-Germanic.
Nov
17
answered Antonym of “recommend”
Nov
17
awarded  Critic
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
English is most certainly NOT a Latin-based language, it's Germanic. Yes it has borrowed from Latin and Latin-based languages (and others) but that's very different.
Oct
15
answered Name for a new “ad” entry encompassing buyer requests and supplier offers