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seen Mar 28 at 20:53

I speak UK English with a slight scottish twist


Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
@Clément - lol! Lost track while trying to remember charmap to get the accent characters. Thanks for the correction.
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
@Irene, sorry if I came across snooty, I was in a rush as I had to prepare my daughter's tea.
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
@Irene, thank you but I have read on the subject e.g. amazon.co.uk/Story-English-Robert-McCrum/dp/0571275087/… If you follow the bl.uk link above as well you'll find a remarkably concise illustration. BTW the language(s)/dialects spoken by the Anglo-Saxons is usually referred to as Old English.
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
Partly because English inherited via French (dévour) via Old French (dévorer) and the Latin as Raku says. So blame the French!
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
For those interested bl.uk/learning/langlit/changlang/across/languagetimeline.html
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
I just checked my copy of the "Oxford Encyclopedia of Language" and English is classified as Indo-European -> Germanic -> West-Germanic.
Nov
17
answered Antonym of “recommend”
Nov
17
awarded  Critic
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
English is most certainly NOT a Latin-based language, it's Germanic. Yes it has borrowed from Latin and Latin-based languages (and others) but that's very different.
Oct
15
answered Name for a new “ad” entry encompassing buyer requests and supplier offers
Oct
15
answered Word for “other people who have the same issue/problem as I have”?
Oct
15
answered What is a gentler word than suspended or closed?
Oct
11
comment “Out of the box” — when should I use this phrase?
It's common enough that at least one survey said it was the UKs most hated phrase, maybe I should downvote myself.
Oct
6
comment “Out of the box” — when should I use this phrase?
Might be a factor of me always working in big data centers or maybe a US/UK thing? Mind you my 15 years with IBM exposed me to enough US jargon. I hear "off the shelf" a lot as well.
Oct
6
comment A word for 'to exist in the same place as something else'
For reason, I suspect maths books from years back, I would say "they are coincident" rather than "they coincide". FWIW.
Oct
6
answered “Out of the box” — when should I use this phrase?
Oct
3
comment What's a word for the opposite of Accountability?
+1 for laissez faire
Sep
22
answered In reply to “Do they have…”, which is correct — “yes, they do” or “yes, they have”?
Sep
22
comment “Software craftsman” as complimentary term for programmer
@FumbleFingers I was thinking of "elegant" in the sense that a maths proof is "elegant" when it is a clean simple proof.
Sep
22
answered Is this usage of “woo” proper?