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I speak UK English with a slight scottish twist


Apr
15
comment Is the verb 'let' transitive or intransitive?
Yes, it should of course be "let me know" and is then obviously transitive. +1
Apr
15
comment What is the noun to refer to the 64- or 32-bit -ness of an operating system
+1 for Jim's comment. As an example of how complex it can be have a look at the history of IBM's XA en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System/370 warning - contains more than 100% of your RDA of WTFs.
Apr
14
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
No, sorry. I see why you read it that way but the main idea is that you're doing something unnecessary because it's superfluous or already done.
Apr
14
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
@DQdlM - yes I think I may have overstated it.
Apr
14
comment Are “rode” and “rowed” pronounced the same?
Personally I think I use a shorter vowel sound in "rode" but that may just be me. FWIW.
Apr
13
answered What does Banglored mean and how it is created?
Apr
13
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
I'm (UK) more familiar with blood from a stone, rather than turnip.
Apr
13
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
It does but it also conveys a vision of impending catastrophe which does not appear relevant. Still a nice image though.
Apr
13
comment How to say “generating errors” in one word?
"Problem files" is one term I've seen used. I wouldn't say they generate the errors though, they demonstrate the existence of errors in the code.
Apr
12
comment Inclusive “or” in speech
I'd just add that programming "or" is the Boolean "OR" operator which has a specificity not in the English language word "or". Just as "and" differs as well.
Mar
27
comment Is this hypothetical (if-clause) question grammatically correct?
@DavidWallace - of course, organization is singular. And Andrew is correct as well. Both +1
Mar
27
comment Is this hypothetical (if-clause) question grammatically correct?
While you're grammatically correct the word "backdoor" is common parlance in IT security. I'm also unsure about was->were as the sentence is so clumsy I'm not sure if the "who" refers to the admin or the organization. If I were an admin responsible for the security of an organisation's network and (I was/they were) using X products in their network, how would I know for sure whether these products had backdoors in them?
Mar
22
answered Using a word to describe that something can be detailed
Mar
22
comment Is “Please to” proper English?
@John - forums.randi.org
Mar
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
21
comment Technical term for `avoiding responsibility` with decision-makers?
+1 Pete. Also suggest you start here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filibuster and follow the links for further reading
Mar
20
comment Is “Please to” proper English?
Embarassingly enough on another forum I use a "Grammar police - to serve and correct" badge as my avatar.
Mar
20
answered Is an all or nothing affair
Mar
20
answered Is “Please to” proper English?
Mar
15
comment “I have no story to be told” or “I have no story to tell”?
Good points FF, but sometimes it's exactly those nuances that make the opening of a book/song/poem work. I enjoy thinking about them anyway