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Jul
26
comment What is the subject of the following sentence?
"that involves" is establishing a restrictive condtion on "adverse reactions (to an otherwise harmless food or food component)" and as such should match the reactions which is plural.
Jul
10
comment What is the factual basis for “pirate speech”? (Did pirates really say things like “shiver me timbers”?)
It's supposed to be a Bristol accent. Which leads to the joke: Q -Why do people from Bristol sound like pirates? A- because they aaaaarrrrrrr!
Jul
10
comment Definite article: Subject verb agreement
cf "The husband and wife greet the guest at the door." Even in these modern days the husband and wife are rarely the same person.
Jul
9
answered What is the most professional name for “squiggly bracket”?
Jun
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
15
comment What does “to spit a rat” mean?
Personally I use the variant "as far as I could happily spit a rat". Not sure where I heard it.
Apr
15
comment Is the sentence “Whose your daddy” interchangeable with “Who's your daddy”?
bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/…
Apr
15
answered Use of “never” in questions
Apr
15
comment Is the verb 'let' transitive or intransitive?
Yes, it should of course be "let me know" and is then obviously transitive. +1
Apr
15
comment What is the noun to refer to the 64- or 32-bit -ness of an operating system
+1 for Jim's comment. As an example of how complex it can be have a look at the history of IBM's XA en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System/370 warning - contains more than 100% of your RDA of WTFs.
Apr
14
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
No, sorry. I see why you read it that way but the main idea is that you're doing something unnecessary because it's superfluous or already done.
Apr
14
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
@DQdlM - yes I think I may have overstated it.
Apr
14
comment Are “rode” and “rowed” pronounced the same?
Personally I think I use a shorter vowel sound in "rode" but that may just be me. FWIW.
Apr
13
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
I'm (UK) more familiar with blood from a stone, rather than turnip.
Apr
13
comment An idiom meaning someone's doing something useless and has no result at the end
It does but it also conveys a vision of impending catastrophe which does not appear relevant. Still a nice image though.
Apr
13
comment How to say “generating errors” in one word?
"Problem files" is one term I've seen used. I wouldn't say they generate the errors though, they demonstrate the existence of errors in the code.
Apr
12
comment Inclusive “or” in speech
I'd just add that programming "or" is the Boolean "OR" operator which has a specificity not in the English language word "or". Just as "and" differs as well.
Mar
27
comment Is this hypothetical (if-clause) question grammatically correct?
@DavidWallace - of course, organization is singular. And Andrew is correct as well. Both +1
Mar
27
comment Is this hypothetical (if-clause) question grammatically correct?
While you're grammatically correct the word "backdoor" is common parlance in IT security. I'm also unsure about was->were as the sentence is so clumsy I'm not sure if the "who" refers to the admin or the organization. If I were an admin responsible for the security of an organisation's network and (I was/they were) using X products in their network, how would I know for sure whether these products had backdoors in them?
Mar
22
answered Using a word to describe that something can be detailed